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Welcome to the Department of English

Fall 2014 Graduate Course Offerings

For the most current schedule information, please visit the University's Course Finder.

ENG 341 Introduction to Descriptive Linguistics

Aims and methods of linguistic science. Nature and functions of language: phonology, morphology, syntax, variation. Relationship of language to culture.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, Mahide Demirci

Section 02, TR at 3:35, Mahide Demirci

ENG 345 Tesol Methods and Materials

Methodologies and techniques for teaching English as a Second Language; evaluation of materials for various levels and instructional goals.  Includes clinical experience.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, Lisya Seloni

Section 02, MW at 2:00, Lisya Seloni

ENG 346 Testing in ESL

Assessing oral and written proficiency in English as a Second Language.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, TBA

Section 02, MW at 3:35, TBA

ENG 347.01 Advanced Creative Writing - Poetry

Workshop format for individual projects; related theory.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, Gabe Gudding

ENG 347.03 Advanced Creative Writing - Non-Fiction

Workshop format for individual projects; related theory.

Section 01, MW at 3:35, Joe Amato

ENG 349 Technical Writing II

Instruction and practice in editing, proposals, and analytical writing; attention given to style manuals, research writing, and (as needed) publication. Computer-assisted.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Angela Haas

Section 02, M at 5:30, Lee Brasseur

ENG 350 Visible Rhetoric

Document design as a rhetorical activity and the application of theories of visible rhetoric to document production. Computer assisted.

Section 1, MW at 2:00, Elise Hurley

In this writing-, reading-, analysis-, and production-intensive course, we will explore how visual elements work in an array of primarily visual texts (broadly defined) as they are located within various rhetorical, social, and cultural contexts. Specifically, we will explore and interrogate notions of visibility by focusing on the following:

  • What does visibility mean?
  • How are primarily visual texts rendered, created, and designed to be visible? For what purposes and audiences? In other words, how do these texts “work”?
  • Who has the privilege of seeing and looking? Who (or what) gets to be seen or looked at?
  • What (or who) is rendered invisible? Why?
  • In order to explore these questions, we will draw from the interdisciplinary field of visual rhetoric and locate lines of inquiry within English studies, rhetoric and composition, professional and technical communication, graphic design, visual culture and cultural studies, advertising, art history, psychology, and others.

    Throughout the semester, we will read, critique, analyze, and produce a variety of visual texts. You are not required to have any expertise using digital technologies, though a willingness to explore, experiment (and yes, make mistakes) with readily available composing technologies is essential.

    ENG 351 Hypertext

    Workshop using digital technologies to compose complex, multimodal, web-based texts for a variety of rhetorical situations. Computer-assisted.

    Section 01, MWF at 1:00, Jim Kalmbach

    Hypertext to me means nonlinear reading and writing. Over the years, students and I have explored this non-linearity in a variety of forms. Most recently, the class has taken on a distinctly web 2.0 turn. In particular, we will look at the impact of template culture on reading and writing, that is how templates are shaping people’s reading and writing on the web, and what you can do to critically resist that shaping.

    We explore these ideas through readings and responses and through a series of projects. Students first create a web site with a content management system--WordPress and then recreate that website in Dreamweaver. Students then, as a final project, complete a major web publishing project in any area of web culture that interests them using any method of production.

    Graduate students in the class complete an additional project, and I offer a good deal of flexibility in shaping that project to fit there interests and program.

    Textbooks
    Beaird, Jason. (2007). The Principles of Beautiful Web Design. Sitepoint, ISBN 098057689X
    Redish, Ginny. (2007). Letting Go of the Words. Morgan Kaufman. ISBN 0123694868

    ENG 352 Selected Figures in Global Literature

    Studies in literary figures, genres, or movements.

    Section 1, TR at 3:35, Krishna Manavalli

    ENG 354 Literary Publishing in Theory and Practice

    Focus on issues that have shaped contemporary literary publishing.

    Section 1, TR at 9:35, Robert McLaughlin

    This course will examine the field of literary publishing in the United States as a mechanism of mediation between authors and readers.  The focus will be on the history of publishing with special emphasis on how changing technology has reframed a set of ongoing issues (risk of publication, copyright, censorship, marketing, distribution, and so on).  We will also examine some case studies in the relationship among author, text, and editor.

    Class meetings will be discussion-based.  Each student will participate in a collaborative research presentation.  There will be four three-page essays and one research-based essay.

    Texts I anticipate using include:

    Nicole Howard, The Book: The Life Story of a Technology
    Eugene Exman, The House of Harper
    Siva Vaidhyanathan, Copyrights and Copywrongs
    Ted Striphas, The Late Age of Print
    John B. Thompson, Merchants of Culture
    Lance Olsen, Theories of Forgetting

    ENG 357 Theories of Creative Writing Genesis

    Survey of theories creative writers explicitly and implicitly employ and consider. Includes editing, analysis, and writing of creative and theoretical texts.

    Section 1, TR at 12:35, Gabe Gudding

    ENG 365 African American Literature

    Advanced critical study of major movements and periods in African-American literature.

    Section 01, TR at 3:35, Chris De Santis

    Troubling the Minstrel Mask: Black Liberatory Practices in Slavery and the Segregation Era
    An exploration of major African American texts of the nineteenth- and early-twentieth centuries and the ideological and practical maps and blueprints they offered readers to navigate the violence and contradictions of a compromised democracy and begin the work of rebuilding a nation that lived up to the ideals on which it was founded.

    Possible Texts (Subject to change before start of semester):

    Autobiographical and Fictional Texts

  • Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave
  • Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
  • Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Iola Leroy
  • Booker T. Washington, Up From Slavery
  • Paul Laurence Dunbar, The Sport of the Gods
  • W. E. B. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk
  • Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God
  • Langston Hughes, The Ways of White Folks
  • Richard Wright, Black Boy
  • Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man


  • Critical, Historical, and Theoretical Texts
  • Henry Louis Gates, Jr., The Signifying Monkey
  • Eric Lott, Love and Theft: Blackface Minstrelsy and the American Working Class
  • Grace Hale, Making Whiteness: The Culture of Segregation in the South, 1890-1940
  • Houston Baker, Blues, Ideology, and Afro-American Literature: A Vernacular Theory
  • Robert Stepto, From Behind the Veil


  • FORMAT OF COURSE:
    Lecture/Discussion

    ENG 374 Storytelling

    The art of storytelling based on knowledge of folklore heritage with experiences in oral transmission of literature in a variety of settings.

    Section 01, T at 5:30, Karen Coats

    Stories and storytelling are foundational to human experience. We tell stories to preserve our individual and cultural memories, share experience, and project possible futures. Our first way of understanding the world is through story, and we continue to use story to explain the world to ourselves, to explain ourselves to others, and to explain ourselves to ourselves. In this class, we will approach storytelling from multiple angles: from theories of why we tell stories and why and how we respond to them, to examinations of how stories work in literature and everyday life, and finally, to techniques of how we can shape and tell stories in effective, entertaining, and multimodal ways.

    Texts:

  • Lipman, Doug, Improving Your Storytelling: Beyond the Basics for All Who Tell Stories in Work and Play
  • Gottschall, Jonathan, The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human
  • Gregory, Marshall, Shaped by Stories
  • Pratchett, Terry, The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents
  • Other readings will be made available through the English Department Digital Reserves.
  • Format:
    In addition to reading and engaging in class discussion about the nature of storytelling, students will develop and perform a variety of types of stories, including folk tales, traditional stories, and various kinds of personal narratives.

    ENG 375 Young Adult Literature

    Advanced critical examination of literature for young adults with emphasis on trends and research. May repeat if content different.

    Section 1, TR at 9:35, Jan Susina

    Required Texts:
    Tavi Gevinson, ed. Rookie Yearbook One. Drawn and Quarterly.
    Sonya Sones. What My Mother Doesn't Know. Simon Pulse.
    Chip Kidd. Go: A Kidd’s Guide to Graphic Design. Workman Publishing.
    Rachel Cohn & David Levithan.  Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist. Knopf.
    William Shakespeare. A Midsummer’s Night Dream, ed. Russ McDonald. Penguin.
    John Green. Looking for Alaska. Speak.
    J.D. Salinger. The Catcher in The Rye. Little Brown.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby. Notes & Preface by Russ McDonald. Penguin.
    Harper Lee. To Kill A Mocking Bird. Warner Books.
    John Lewis. March: Book 1. Top Shelf.
    Ray Bradbury. Farenheit 451. Simon & Schuster.
    Suzanne Collins. The Hunger Games. Scholastic.

    Course Description:
    This course will emphasize reading of young adult literature and consider how such texts fit into the broader realm of adolescent culture.  The course will trace the development of the genre of adolescent literature and examine the representation of adolescence and adolescent concerns in these texts.  Readings will include books written specifically for adolescents, books selected and read by adolescents outside of school, and books that are assigned to adolescents in the high school.  In addition to reading a variety of literary genres—fiction, poetry, drama, graphic novel, and nonfiction—the course will also address other influential elements of adolescent popular culture including film, music, websites, and television programs that all contribute to teens understanding of themselves and their place in the world.

    Course Format:
    Students will write one research paper (7-10 pages), while graduate students will write a longer research paper (12-15 pages) on an adolescent text or some aspect of adolescent culture.  All students will write a short film analysis (3-5 pages). A midterm and final exam will be given as well as reading quizzes and short assignments based on the reading throughout the semester. Graduate students will have the opportunity to lead a class discussion.  Regular attendance and active participation in class discussion is expected.

    Section 2, TR at 11:00, Jan Susina

    Required Texts:
    Tavi Gevinson, ed. Rookie Yearbook One. Drawn and Quarterly.
    Sonya Sones. What My Mother Doesn't Know. Simon Pulse.
    Chip Kidd. Go: A Kidd’s Guide to Graphic Design. Workman Publishing.
    Rachel Cohn & David Levithan.  Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist. Knopf.
    William Shakespeare. A Midsummer’s Night Dream, ed. Russ McDonald. Penguin.
    John Green. Looking for Alaska. Speak.
    J.D. Salinger. The Catcher in The Rye. Little Brown.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby. Notes & Preface by Russ McDonald. Penguin.
    Harper Lee. To Kill A Mocking Bird. Warner Books.
    John Lewis. March: Book 1. Top Shelf.
    Ray Bradbury. Farenheit 451. Simon & Schuster.
    Suzanne Collins. The Hunger Games. Scholastic.

    Course Description:
    This course will emphasize reading of young adult literature and consider how such texts fit into the broader realm of adolescent culture.  The course will trace the development of the genre of adolescent literature and examine the representation of adolescence and adolescent concerns in these texts.  Readings will include books written specifically for adolescents, books selected and read by adolescents outside of school, and books that are assigned to adolescents in the high school.  In addition to reading a variety of literary genres—fiction, poetry, drama, graphic novel, and nonfiction—the course will also address other influential elements of adolescent popular culture including film, music, websites, and television programs that all contribute to teens understanding of themselves and their place in the world.

    Course Format:
    Students will write one research paper (7-10 pages), while graduate students will write a longer research paper (12-15 pages) on an adolescent text or some aspect of adolescent culture.  All students will write a short film analysis (3-5 pages). A midterm and final exam will be given as well as reading quizzes and short assignments based on the reading throughout the semester. Graduate students will have the opportunity to lead a class discussion.  Regular attendance and active participation in class discussion is expected.

    ENG 384 Introduction to Cultural Theory

    Introduction to the history and practice of cultural theory.

    Section 01, MW at 2:00, Julie Jung

    Undoing Normalcy: Theory for Accessible Cultures


    “An accessible society, according to the best, critically disabled perspectives, is not simply one with ramps and Braille signs on ‘public’ buildings, but one in which our ways of relating to, and depending on, each other have been reconfigured.” —Robert McRuer


    This course will engage and forge intersections between theoretical scholarship in disability, feminist, and queer studies for purposes of understanding how beliefs about what it means to “be normal” are culturally constructed and thus open to contestation and revision. We will begin by studying the concepts of “culture” and “normalcy” as interrelated rhetorical phenomena. We will then read scholarly texts that theorize how ideologies of normalcy function to privilege some and do violence to others. We will also examine how theorists, creative writers, documentary filmmakers, and performance artists speak back to the hegemony of normalcy by undoing its definitional assumptions. While undertaking this aforementioned work, we will pay particular attention to the ways in which normalcy is reproduced and contested in and through visual texts and technologies as well as acts of visual perception. The primary goal of our inquiry will be to learn ways of thinking and doing that (to paraphrase Robert McRuer) radically reconfigure what it means to relate to and depend upon one another.

    Required Texts

  • Davis, Lennard J., ed. Disability Studies Reader, 4th ed. (available as an e-book via Milner)
  • Garland-Thomson, Rosemarie. Staring: How We Look
  • Kafer, Alison. Feminist, Queer, Crip
  • McRuer, Robert. Crip Theory: Cultural Signs of Queerness and Disability
  • Padden, Carol A., and Tom L. Humphries. Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture
  • Serano, Julia. Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity
  • Warner, Michael. The Trouble with Normal: Sex, Politics, and the Ethics of Queer Life
  • Documentary films: Vital Signs: Crip Culture Talks Back and Through Deaf Eyes
  • English 391 Survey of Classical Rhetoric

    Rhetorical theory from ancient Greece and Rome, 500 BCE to 100 CE, emphasizing the Older Sophists, Aspasia, Isocrates, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero and Quintilian. Also discusses contemporary applications of classical rhetoric and rhetorics of other cultures in the western classical era.

    Section 01, T at 5:30, Casie Cobos

    ENG 394 TESOL Practicum

    Observation, case studies, tutoring, instructional assistance, and some teaching experience in English as a Second Language.

    Section 01, W at 1:00, Lisya Seloni

    ENG 395 Problems in the Teaching of English

    Theory and practice in the teaching of language, literature, and composition at the seconfary and community college levels.

    Section 01, TR at 3:35, Sarah Hochstetler

    This course will focus on teacher research in the English Language Arts (ELA) classroom. The curriculum will include foundational readings on teacher research in the ELA, an introduction to theories of and frameworks for conducting teacher research, and samples of published teacher research. Throughout the semester the professor will share pieces of her current inquiry project as a model of one approach to teacher research. Major assignments will include presentations on readings; analytic and reflective writing; proposing, designing, and implementing an appropriate research project based on teacher inquiry in the ELA; and presenting the project to peers and the local learning community. This course will require a clinical component.

    Graduate students should anticipate modified course content: feel free to contact Dr. Hochstetler for more information at shochst@ilstu.edu

    ENG 398 Professional Practice: Internship in English

    Supervised field experience in English with local, state, national, and international businesses, agencies, institutions (including colleges and universities), and organizations.

    Section 01, Arranged, Jim Kalmbach

    Information about internships is available at http://english.illinoisstate.edu/undergrad/internships/index.shtml

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    ENG 400 Independent Study

    Directed independent study in an area of English Studies. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and Graduate Coordinator.

    ENG 401 Introduction to Graduate Study

    Introduction to bibliography, methods of research, critical evaluation of scholarship, and recent developments in literary theory and criticism.

    Section 01, TR at 3:35, Robert McLaughlin

    This course will introduce new graduate students to the theory, methods, and practices of English Studies on a professional level. As a group, we will do readings in the concept of English Studies and a broader survey of theory; we will explore the methods of graduate-level research; we will practice critical reading; we will practice professional writing. Individually, each student will define and execute a semester-long seminar essay in her or his area of English Studies. This project will be conducted in stages: proposal; forum analysis; annotated bibliography; completed essay.

    Class meetings will be discussion-based. Students will frequently be called upon to serve as discussion leaders. In addition to the above project, students can expect to be assigned several short essays connected to the reading.

    ENG 402 Teaching Composition

    Introduction to theory, research, and practice in the teaching of composition. Required for students with teaching assistantships in composition at ISU.

    Section 01, R at 5:30, Joyce Walker and Elizabeth Hatmaker

    ENG 403 Poetics

    Study of theories, techniques, and cultural contexts of poetry and poets, emphasizing historical and sociological perspectives.

    Section 01, T at 5:30, Tim Hunt

    Once upon a time, writing (both in and of itself and wearing its costume of print) was the primary medium for storing language. As the gilded 19th gave way to the 20th century, other textual media (sound recording, radio and the like) began competing with writing/print and demanding a piece of the cultural action, and now the subversion and resurrection of actual “media” as virtual “media” under the sign of the digital is driving yet another Matrix.

    These shifts underscore the possibility that textuality is not a stable function but instead a series of technologically and institutionally inflected practices that enable (and perhaps to some extent elicit) different ways of understanding poetry and poetics—both as occasions for scholarly analysis and aesthetic production.

    In this iteration of English 403, we will examine a mix of critical and textual theory and a range of major (and contested) statements on poetics in order to problematize the Post-Romantic (an arc that includes, I’d suggest, both modernism and the post-modern) poetic theory and practice.

    This seminar, drawing on what might be termed the poetics of textual media, is designed (topics, readings, projects) to accommodate practicing poets, those interested in the intersection of literary theory and literary history, and those engaged in new media studies.

    ENG 431 Studies in Early American Literature

    Figures, movements, or genres in North American Literatures, including the colonial and early Republican periods and/or extra-colonial literatures.

    Section 01, T at 5:30, Susan Kalter

    DESCRIPTION OF COURSE:
    Those Unruly Americans: Bad Boys and Girls of the Eighteenth Century
    The United States stakes itself upon its reputation, and the reputation of the United States and its precedent British colonies has always been one of transgression. Americans always have been and still are “not amenable to rule or discipline; ungovernable; disorderly, turbulent.” Or, at least, we always have been and still are seen as such and often enamored with seeing ourselves as such. We are metaphorically all sinners…in the hands of an angry god, or of a tyrannical Great Britain, or of a judgmental civil society. In this course, we will be reading works that exemplify America’s courtship with dangerous behaviors and even more dangerous ideas. Liberty. Gender equity. Democracy. From the diary of a man who sent witches and warlocks to death in the Salem witch trials, to a novel about a woman tilting at windmills to find the romantic love she only reads about in novels, we’ll look at how American writers from 1691-1812 negotiated the strictures of expectation. Whether they felt themselves judged and condemned by God or by the too-exacting morality of their peers or by their own consciences, whether they prophesied divine wrath against the slaveholder or trampled on sacred monarchies or defied the early nation-builders of an increasingly imperializing Federalism, they are tied together by the grand and contradictory and often hypocritical moral quest that came to define America. Can a nation establish itself as the beacon of good in the world while doing everything in its power to be bad?

    REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS:
    Many of the primary texts for this course may be found online at no charge. Students wishing to purchase particular titles may use the book order as a guide, or consult with me for tips on other editions. You may also prefer reading from a print text rather than a screen, but in some cases will have to choose one or the other mode. We will be reading in full or in excerpt from the following titles or collected works: The Diary of Samuel Sewell; The Journal of Sarah Kemble Knight; The Redeemed Captive Returning to Zion by John Williams; “The Sot-Weed Factor” by Ebenezer Cook; The Histories of the Dividing Line betwixt Virginia and North Carolina (secret and more secret and not so secret) by William Byrd; “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” by Jonathan Edwards; Customs of the American Indians by Joseph-François Lafitau; The Journal of John Woolman and other writings by the same; Some Account of the Fore Part of the Life of Elizabeth Ashbridge; various works by Benjamin Franklin; Martha Milcah Moore’s Book; The History of Maria Kittle by Anna Eliza Bleecker; The Blockheads, or the Affrighted Officers by Mercy Otis Warren; writings by Phillis Wheatley; Notes on the State of Virginia by Thomas Jefferson; Letters from an American Farmer by J. Hector St. John de Crèvecoeur; The Anti-Federalist Papers; Selected Writings of Judith Sargent Murray; The Conquest of Canaan by Timothy Dwight; The Vision of Columbus by Joel Barlow; The Contrast by Royall Tyler; Charlotte Temple and/or Lucy Temple by Susanna Rowson; The Coquette by Hannah Webster Foster; Clara Howard and/or Jane Talbot by Charles Brockden Brown; Female Quixotism by Tabitha Gilman Tenney; and Kelroy by Rebecca Rush.
    Students will also perform source discovery on critical/theoretical and historical articles relevant to these texts.

    FORMAT OF COURSE:
    The class will be conducted in a seminar format to maximize engaged discussion and contributions from various perspectives. Course assignments will include: a research project; article searches and presentations; regular, well-informed weekly participation (completion and thoughtful consideration of the readings, etc.).
    This course is designed to accommodate all students and I assume no prior experience or expertise. A commitment to engage with critical and theoretical approaches to literary and cultural texts will be expected of all students.
    Interdisciplinary projects emerging from any or all the areas of English Studies (and/or from other disciplines outside of English Studies) are welcomed and encouraged. Please contact me at 438-8660 or susankalter@ilstu.edu with any questions.

    ENG 440 Studies in English Linguistics

    Advanced study and research in various aspects of the English language.

    Section 01, MWF at 9:00, Susan Burt

    REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS:

  • Duffy, John M. 2007. Writing from These Roots: Literacy in a Hmong-American Community. Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press.
  • Dunn, Mark. 2001. Ella Minnow Pea: A Novel in Letters. New York: Anchor Books.
  • Lippi-Green, Rosina. 1997. English with an Accent: Language, ideology and discrimination in the United States. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Schieffelin, Bambi, Kathryn Woolard and Paul Kroskrity (eds.) 1998. Language Ideologies: Practice and Theory. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • And there will be other readings as well, possibly in a Pip’s packet or on electronic reserve.

    DESCRIPTION OF COURSE:
    This section of English 440 will focus on language ideologies. A fictional polity’s devastating language ideology is explored in the dystopic novel Ella Minnow Pea. With readings from the Schieffelin volume, we will explore the anthropological approach to language ideologies (which are never only about language). We then explore in depth the language myths and ideology of the United States, including its manifestations in school classrooms, in English With an Accent (Rosina Lippi-Green). We will continue with an ethnography of literacy, Writing from These Roots (John M. Duffy), which shows how immigrants to the United States acquire literacy and a new language, and learn to argue against discourses and ideologies that would position them as perpetual outsiders.

    FORMAT OF COURSE:
    Classes will focus primarily on discussion of the readings. There will probably be a midterm exam and at least one term paper.

    ENG 447 Creative Writing Seminar

    Practice in the writing of either poetry or fiction for graduate level or professional writers. Available as 447.01 Creative Writing Seminar: Poetry; 447.02 Creative Writing Seminar: Prose (may be repeated for maximum of 12 hours). Consent of instructor. May be repeated.

    ENG 447.02 Creative Writing Seminar: Prose

    Section 01, MW at 4:00, Kass Fleisher

    ENG 449 History and Theory of Technical and Professional Writing

    Reading and research in technical/professional communication emphasizing foundations in history, theory, culture, rhetoric, and technology.

    Section 01, T at 5:30, Angela Haas


    Course Overview
    The course provides a broad introduction to the histories of technical communication—as aprofession and an academic discipline—and the leading theories in major research studies. The course begins by examining the multiple historical roots of technical communication (rhetorical, cultural, technological, and scientific) and how these histories reflect particular values that shape
    contemporary practice, politics, and knowledge paradigms in technical communication studies. Then we will turn our attention toward current and emerging issues in the field in terms of theory, practice, and professionalization with particular emphasis on rhetorical contexts of practice and the legal, political, environmental, ethical, and social justice implications of technical and professional
    communication. Reading in, discussing, and writing about these issues will afford us opportunities to grapple with a variety of theoretical and methodological frameworks and to investigate culturally shaped literacies and rhetorics that construct (and are constructed by) the interactions of
    technologies, organizations, institutions, and audiences. Further, guest technical communication scholars and practitioners will Skype into our class on occasion.


    Course projects will include: collaborative informal report and presentation on a scholarly journal in technical communication studies; monthly reading reports; class facilitation; research project proposal.


    Tentative Readings
    I will be requiring eight books from the following list of potential texts for the course (those who
    sign up for the course by May will be asked for their top three text preferences from the list below
    before I finalize)--and the remainder of course readings will consist supplemental journal articles and
    select chapters from the remaining texts (and will be provided for you):

    Amare, Nicole & Manning, Alan D. (2013). A unified theory of information design: Visuals, text & ethics. Amityville, NY: Baywood.
    Grabill. Jeffery T. (2007). Writing community change: Designing technologies for citizen action. Creskill, NJ:
    Hampton Press.
    Fountain, T. Kenny. (2014). Rhetoric in the flesh: Trained vision, technical expertise, and the gross anatomy lab.
    NY: Routledge.
    Hayhoe, George F. and Helen M. Grady, Eds. (2009). Connecting people with technology: Issues in
    professional communication. Amityville, NY: Baywood.
    Kynell-Hunt, Teresa and Gerald J. Savage, Eds. (2004). Power and legitimacy in technical communication:
    Strategies for professional status. Amityville, NY: Baywood.
    Adrienne P. Lamberti and Anne R. Richards, Eds. (2011). Complex worlds: Digital culture, rhetoric, and
    professional communication. Amityville, NY: Baywood Publishing.
    Longo, Bernadette. (2000). Spurious coin: A history of science, management, and technical writing. Albany:
    State University of New York P, 2000.
    Potts, Liza. (2014). Social media in disaster response: How experience architects can build for participation. NY:
    Routledge.
    Scott, J. Blake, Bernadette Longo, & Katherine V. Wills, Eds. (2006). Critical power tools: Technical
    communication and cultural studies. NY: SUNY Press.
    Sun, Huatong. (2012). Cross-cultural technology design: Creating culture-sensitive technology for local users.
    Oxford

    ENG 450 Studies in Ancient Literatures

    Selected readings from antiquity, mostly Biblical and classical, with consideration to Eastern literature.

    Section 01, T at 5:30, Susan Kim and Rebecca Saunders

    “From his skull they made the sky”:  Violence, Creation and Re-purposing in Ancient Literature

    Description:
    This course will survey a number of “foundational” texts from the Ancient world: Inanna, the Book of Esther, the Mahabharata, the Iliad, the Oresteia, the Tain, the Mabanogi, the Aeneid, the City of God, the Elder Edda. We will consider these texts in their contexts of production, analyze the forms of transformation and translation they have undergone, and study their extensive influence on other civilizations, time periods and forms of cultural production (such as the visual arts).  We will pay particular attention to narratives of origin and foundation, to the forms of violence or destruction which these narratives often entail, and to the political and ideological uses of origins. We will study, for example, the origin of gods; the creation of the human world by gods such as the Aesir, or through the generative contact of opposing natural forces; the foundation of cities, peoples, civilizations, religions and philosophical systems. We will explore the (often brutal) processes of creation they detail--the dismemberment of the giant Ymir in the Norse creation myth, the “gush of blood” which comes upon Mebh in the Táin, the spectacle of torture in the early saints lives, the sexual creation of the Theogony, the domestication of the Furies in the Oresteia, the costly war undertaken by Aeneas.
    Reading these texts as the foundation for a number of cultural and literary traditions, we will also problematize the very search for origins that prompts our enterprise and establishes these texts as “foundational” in the first place. As Allen Franzen has argued, “The search for origins is never disinterested; those wishing to trace an idea or tradition to its historical, linguistic, and textual beginnings have always done so with a thesis in mind, and the origin they have found has often been an origin they have produced” (Desire for Origin xii). We will thus examine both the ideological work performed by these narratives within their original contexts and the political, religious, and aesthetic purposes they have served in later eras.
    Despite the cultural distinctiveness to which narratives of origin regularly lay claim, they are often artifacts of “contact zones”—of cultural and temporal crossroads in which narrative materials are shared, transmitted, appropriated and “repurposed.” Thus, like the narratives they themselves have “repurposed,” they may thereby also become inadvertent foundations for projects and intentions their “original”creators could not have imagined. We will thus investigate these processes of appropriation and translation, examining how and why authors of different cultures and ages have made these texts their “own.”

    Readings will be drawn from the following texts:
    Aeschylus. Oresteia. Trans. Richmond Lattimore. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1953.
    Augustine. City of God. Trans. Henry Bettenson. New York: Penguin, 2003.
    Bhagavad Gita. Trans. Stephen Mitchell. New York:  Three Rivers Press, 2002.
    Brown, Peter. The Cult of the Saints: Its Rise and Function in Latin Christianity. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1981.
    Friedman, Richard Eliott. Who Wrote the Bible? New York: Harper, 1987.
    Inanna: Queen of Heaven and Earth; her stories and hymns from Ancient
    Kalidasa, The Loom of Time: A Selection of his Plays and Poems, trans. Chandra Rajan. New York:  Penguin, 2007.
    Ovid. The Metamorphoses. Trans. Charles Martin. New York: Norton, 2005.
    Plato. Five Dialogues. Trans. G.M.A. Grube. Indianapolis: Hackett, 2002.
    Poems of the Elder Edda. Trans. Patricia Terry. Rev. Ed. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, 1990.
    Smith, Mark . The Early History of God: Yahweh and the Other Deities in Ancient Israel. Grand Rapids:  Eerdmens, 2002.
    Sumer.  Trans. Diane Wolkstein. New York:  Harper and Row, 1983.
    The Apocrypha. Trans. Edgar J. Goodspeed. New York: Vintage, 1989.
    The Bible. Revised Standard Version
    The Mabinogi and other Medieval Welsh Tales. Trans and ed. Patrick K. Ford. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2008.
    Virgil. The Aeneid of Virgil. Trans. Allen Mandelbaum. Berkeley: University of
    California Press, 1998.

    Course Requirements:
    This class is a seminar, not a lecture. Active and informed participation is a requirement for
    credit in this class. Although participation will contribute only 20% to the final grade, failure to
    participate in more than 50% of classes will result in an F for the course.
    Each student will be responsible for leading one hour of discussion or presenting a twenty minute talk on the texts assigned for a class meeting.  Each student will research and write a paper suitable for presentation in a professional conference, and will both present an abstract of that paper orally to the class in the final week of the semester and submit a formal written version of the paper in MLA format in the final week of the semester. On or before the twelfth week of class, each student will submit a draft of his or her paper to a respondent in the class. The respondent must read the draft and prepare a brief (3-5 page) and informed response to the draft.

    ENG 470 Studies in Children's Literature

    Topics in texts for children and adolescents: genres, authors, critical approaches, themes, or historical developments.

    Section 01, W at 2:00, Roberta Trites

    Twenty-First Century Feminisms in Children’s Novels 

    REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS:

    Possible children’s novels to be read during the semester include the following (although this list is subject to change):

                 Christopher Paul Curtis, The Mighty Miss Malone

                  Kate Di Camillo, Flora and Ulysses

                  Terry Pratchett, The Wee Free Men

                  Lissa Price, Starters

                  Margaret Mahy, Kaitangata Twitch

                  Jewell Parker Rhodes, Ninth Ward

                  Pam Muñoz Ryan, Becoming Naomi Leon

                  Fatima Sharafeddine, The Servant

                  Other novels TBA

    Critical and theoretical readings will come from Material Feminisms (ed. Alaimo and Hekman) and from critical readings held in online reserves at Milner Library.

    DESCRIPTION OF COURSE:

                  Although early feminist studies foregrounded the inherent sexism in children’s literature, by the 1990s, scholars were paying attention to feminism as a way to understand children’s literature in more complicated ways. Waking Sleeping Beauty: Feminist Voices in Children’s Literature (1997), for example, focuses on discourse and subjectivity, narrative structure, motherhood and sisterhood, and metafiction as children’s authors use them to depict empowered girls. But within the field of children’s literature, feminism and feminist thought has become increasingly nuanced in the twenty-first century. This course seeks to expand on the preliminary work done in Waking Sleeping Beauty within the context of more recent feminist scholarship.

                  Major topics in the course will include embodiment, sexuality, alterity, ethics, material feminism, ecocriticism, and discourse, with some attention paid to feminism as it intersects with genre theory. Students will read both feminist scholars who write about children’s literature and those who don’t. Selected readings from these theorists are likely to include (in alphabetical order): Stacy Alaimo, Holly Blackford, Susan Bordo, Clare Bradford, Judith Butler, Karen Coats, Claire Colbrook, Sarah Day, Victoria Flanagan, Elizabeth Grosz, Donna Haraway, Susan Hekman, bell hooks, Lydia Kokkola, Kerry Mallan, Mary Moran, Maria Nikolajeva, Jody Norton, Martha Nussbaum, Margaret Mackey, Elizabeth Marshall, Lissa Paul, Kimberley Reynolds, Joe Sutliff, Sanders, Deborah Thacker, Allison Waller, Patricia Williams, Christine Wilkie-Stibbs, and Vivian Yenkia-Agbaw.

    FORMAT OF COURSE:

                  Students will read approximately 3-4 articles of criticism/theory and one children’s novel weekly. Students will write a weekly email response to that week’s theoretical readings. All students will give a presentation and write a 20-page seminar paper on a topic related to 21st century feminisms in children’s literature.

     

    ENG 486 Studies in the English Novel

    Topics in the development of the English novel, with attention to particular techniques, figures, themes or movements.

    Section 01, TR at 2:00, Krishna Manavalli

    ENG 489.10 Studies in U.S. Latino/a Literatures and Cultures

    Section 01, M at 5:30, Kristin Dykstra

    ENG 495 Topics in English

    Advanced study and research in an announced area of language or literature.

    Section 01, TR at 3:35, Paula Ressler

    Troubling Racialized Sexuality and Gender Constructs in Holocaust Literature


    Holocaust studies is often conceptualized as neutral in relation to sexuality and gender, as are a number of other instances of genocide, including the genocides against indigenous peoples throughout the world and peoples of African descent as a result of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. In this course we will explore the complex and often-ignored implications of gender and sexuality that appear in Holocaust-related literature to see the specific ways that women and men and gay and straight, Jewish and gentile, were impacted by the mass violence and genocide that occurred from 1933-1945, particularly in Europe. We will study this literature to deepen our understanding of the cultural and historical context of Nazism, its ability to cause so much widespread and unspeakable suffering, the possibilities and impossibilities of resistance, and how its aftermath impacts our lives today.

    We will read across literary genres and film, and apply what we learn from theoretical and historical texts to see how the Third Reich’s racialized and nationalized sexuality and gender constructs shaped the world of the 1930s and 1940s and continues to influence today’s world. We will explore racialized sexuality and gender constructs in the literature we read from the perspectives of victims, survivors, perpetrators, witnesses, bystanders, resisters, and their descendants. We will compare these constructs to those from other cultures and time periods to discern their commonalities and differences, and speculate about the potential for future genocides given the nature and difficulty of undoing centuries of racist and sexist social constructs.

    The course will include on-line discussion assignments, the writing of literary analysis papers, and a research paper based upon individual students’ interests.

    ENG 496 Theory and Research in Rhetoric and Composition Studies

    Advanced study of recent theory and research in Rhertoic and Composition Studies.

    Section 1, W at 5:30, Elise Hurley

    Public Rhetorics and Public Pedagogies

    With an emphasis on pedagogy, this course will focus on the ways in which activism, advocacy, civic engagement, community literacies, service learning, and social justice intersect with various publics and counterpublics to inform the work of scholars, teachers, and students in rhetoric and writing studies. Among the questions we will explore include:

  • How are publics, counterpublics, and, conversely, “the private” constituted? In what ways do these configurations inform rhetoric and writing pedagogy?
  • What “counts” as an act of public rhetoric or an instantiation of public pedagogy, and how are they valued both inside and outside of the academy?
  • What are the risks and rewards of “going public”?
  • In what ways do dissent and resistance complicate, extend, or contribute to existing conversations about public rhetorics and public pedagogies?
  • We will consider these questions by exploring an array of theoretical, methodological, practical, and pedagogical approaches to “going public” in contexts such as writing program administration, community outreach initiatives, client -consultant relationships in professional and technical communication, service-learning partnerships, and others.

    Potential course texts may include, but are not limited to:

  • The Public Work of Rhetoric: Citizen-Scholars and Civic Engagement – Ed. John M. Ackerman and David J. Coogan
  • Writing Community Change: Designing Technologies for Citizen Action – Jeffrey T. Grabill
  • Community Action and Organizational Change: Image, Narrative, Identity – Brenton Faber
  • Community Literacy and the Rhetoric of Public Engagement – Linda Flower
  • Activism and Rhetoric: Theories and Contexts for Political Engagement – Ed. Seth Kahn and Jonghwa Lee
  • Going Public: What Writing Programs Learn from Engagement – Ed. Shirley K. Rose and Irwin Weiser
  • Unsustainable: Re-Imagining Community Literacy, Public Writing, Service Learning, and the University – Ed. Jessica Restaino and Laurie JC Cella
  • Additionally, we will read a range of articles on public rhetorics and public pedagogies from journals such as Reflections: A Journal of Public Rhetoric, Civic Writing, and Service Learning, Community Literacy Journal, Pedagogy, TCQ, JBTC, CCC, RSQ, Rhetoric Review, among others.

    ENG 498 Professional Practice: Internship in English

    Supervised field experience in English with local, state, national, and international businesses, agencies, institutions (including colleges and universities), and organizations. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

    Section 01, Arranged, Jim Kalmbach

    ENG 499 Master's Thesis

    Section 01, Arranged

    ENG 500 Independent Study

    Directed independent study in an area of English Studies. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and Graduate Coordinator.

    ENG 560 Seminar in Literature and Culture

    Research in selected areas of literary and/or cultural study framed within the contexts of pedagogy and English Studies.

    Section 01, W at 5:30, Cynthia Huff

    Required Textbooks:  It is essential for class work and discussion that you buy or rent these editions of these required texts
    Anzaldúa, Gloria.  Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza. 4th ed. San Francisco: Aunt Lute Books, 2012.
    Bruns, Cristina V. Why Literature? The Value of Literary Reading and What It Means for Teaching. New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2011.
    Guillory, John. Cultural Capital: The Problem of Literary Canon Formation. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1993.
    hooks, bell. Teaching Critical Thinking. New York: Routledge, 2010.
    Mairs, Nancy. Plaintext.  Tucson: U of Arizona P, 1992.
    McComiskey, Bruce. English Studies: An Introduction to the Discipline(s). Urbana,IL: NCTE, 2006.
    Rivkin, Julie and Michael Ryan. Literary Theory: An Anthology. 2nd ed. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley Blackwell, 2010.
    Stoker, Bram. Dracula. Ed. Nina Auerbach and David Skol. New York: Norton, 1996.

    DESCRIPTION OF COURSE:

    This Literature and Culture Seminar will situate the study and practice of literature and culture in a variety of contexts. These include the development of literature as a profession, historical and theoretical teaching practices as these have been modified since the eighteenth century, current and earlier theoretical applications, and approaches to critiquing and teaching literature and culture as well as possible future directions for the practice of literary theory and consideration of literary texts within English Studies and cultural contexts.  The course will also investigate how several literary texts from different genres and time periods but under the umbrella of life narrative can be read through the lens of different theoretical perspectives and be taught in ways that inform and reflect their positioning within the academy and within culture. Interrogating and practicing pedagogy will be a primary component of the course as questions about it as theory and praxis will be a thread running through all our discussions and be explicitly addressed in a number of the readings.

    FORMAT OF COURSE:

    It is crucial to the success of the seminar as a learning community that all students attend class and participate in discussions. Students will be specifically required to lead two fifteen minute sessions of teaching praxis where they will explicate and interrogate the applications of a literary/ cultural critical theory and/or the usefulness of literary periods. They will also be required to write a two page analysis of the journal where they intend to publish their research paper. The final requirement will be a 20-25 page research paper where students will apply a chosen literary/cultural critical theory to an area of research within English Studies, ideally one that they have chosen to pursue either in their comps or dissertation.

    ENG 590 Seminar in Rhetoric and Composition Studies

    Research in the configurations of rhetoric and composition studies, with emphasis on English Studies and the post-secondary teaching of writing.

    Section 01, M at 5:30, Bob Broad

    ENG 591 Practicum (Internship) in College Teaching

    Teaching of lower-division English courses with emphasis upon new techniques; under faculty direction, at Illinois State University or off campus; in conjunction with tutorial meetings. Prerequisite: completion of doctoral course work.

    ENG 599 Research and Dissertation

    Research involving the gathering of materials and data and the writing of a dissertation.

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