Department of English at Illinois State University

Fall 2014 Undergraduate Course Offerings

For the most current schedule information, please visit the University's Course Finder.

ENG 100 Introduction to English Studies

Reading and writing in English, an introduction to the various sub-disciplines of English.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, Brian Rejack

Section 02, MW at 1:00, Carol Lind

In this course, we will explore the various areas of inquiry that fall under the umbrella of English Studies here at ISU. Through reading, writing, and hands-on activities, we will learn about the many ways in which the English Studies model enables us to negotiate meaning as creators and consumers of the written word. This course will be taught in conjunction with one of two special sections of ENG 101 (sections 38 & 45), designed exclusively for incoming English majors.

Section 03, MW at 2:30, Carol Lind

In this course, we will explore the various areas of inquiry that fall under the umbrella of English Studies here at ISU. Through reading, writing, and hands-on activities, we will learn about the many ways in which the English Studies model enables us to negotiate meaning as creators and consumers of the written word. This course will be taught in conjunction with one of two special sections of ENG 101 (sections 38 & 45), designed exclusively for incoming English majors.

Section 04, TR at 9:35, Amy Robillard

Section 05, TR at 12:35, Rhonda Nicol

Section 06, TR at 2:00, Rhonda Nicol

Section 07, TR at 3:35, Tim Hunt

ENG 101 Composition as Critical Inquiry (Sections 01-59)

Rhetorical approach to writing, taught through extensive collaborative drafting, revising, and editing. Emphasis on critical reading and analysis. Computer-assisted. Not for credit major/minor. May not be taken under the CT/NC option.

Section 38, TR at 2:00, Carol Lind

This section of English 101 is designed exclusively for incoming English majors, and will be taught in conjunction with English 100 (sections 2 & 3). In this course, we will explore the writing conventions and techniques that are specific to the discipline of English Studies, while we come to better understand the specialized vocabularies, conventions, styles, genres, uses of texts, and criteria of judgment that one would expect to find within the English Studies program here at Illinois State University.

Section 45, TR at 3:35, Carol Lind

This section of English 101 is designed exclusively for incoming English majors, and will be taught in conjunction with English 100 (sections 2 & 3). In this course, we will explore the writing conventions and techniques that are specific to the discipline of English Studies, while we come to better understand the specialized vocabularies, conventions, styles, genres, uses of texts, and criteria of judgment that one would expect to find within the English Studies program here at Illinois State University.

ENG 101.10 Composition as Critical Inquiry (Sections 01-12)

Rhetorical approach to writing, taught through extensive collaborative drafting, revising, and editing. Emphasis on critical reading and analysis. Computer-assisted. Not for credit major/minor. May not be taken under the CT/NC option.

ENG 102 Introduction to English Studies Proseminar


Section 01, M at 4:00, Mark Vegter

Section 02, M at 5:00, Mark Vegter

Section 03, T at 5:00, Mark Vegter

Section 04, W at 4:00, Mark Vegter

ENG 110 English Literature and Its Contexts

A historical study of the main movements in English literature. Readings of entire works representative of the movements.

Section 02, MW at 11:00, Jeff Rients

Section 03, TR at 9:35, Tara Lyons

Section 04, TR at 12:35, Tara Lyons

IDS 121.19 Texts and Contexts

Interdisciplinary writing-intensive course focusing on significant humanities texts in relationship to their historical and cultural contexts.

Section 01, TR at 11:00, John MacLean

Section 02, MW at 12:35, Sam Kamara

Section 03, TR at 2:00, Michael Wollitz

This course examines a number of ways in which contemporary literature engages with and critiques contemporary American culture. The bulk of the class will be spent on a survey of texts that explore a few of the most powerful and often contentious issues found in modern society, including (but not limited to) matters of the environment, economics, race, sexuality, international relations/globalism, and digital frontiers. Required texts throughout the semester will include the novels A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan; The Circle by Dave Eggers; The Round House by Louise Erdrich; Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk by Ben Fountain; and Zone One by Colson Whitehead. These works of fiction will be augmented with an assortment of pertinent theoretical readings that flesh out the stakes involved in probing these subjects. Ultimately this course should provide students with an opportunity to use literature as a means to intervene in the world around them in a multitude of ways.

Section 04, TR at 3:35, Sarah Hochstetler

IDS 121.52 Ethnic Literatures

Interdisciplinary writing-intensive course focusing on significant humanities texts in relationship to their historical and cultural contexts.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, Casie Cobos

Section 02, TR at 12:35, Casie Cobos

ENG 124 Film Style and Literature

An introduction to the analysis of films and their literary components through an application of specialized terms and concepts. Not for credit if had ENG 107.

Section 01, TR at 9:35, Elizabeth Hatmaker

Section 02, TR at 11:00, Elizabeth Hatmaker

ENG 125 Literary Narrative

Critical reading and analysis of a variety of literary narratives that reflect on human experience. May not be taken under the CT/NC option.

Section 02, TR at 12:35, Meg Gregory

Section 03, MW at 4:00, Shailen Mishra

Section 04, MW at 12:35, Amy Hicks

ENG 128 Gender in the Humanities

Examination of gender roles, norms, and stereotypes from a broad range of perspectives within humanities across centuries and cultures. May not be taken under the CT/NC option.

Section 02, TR at 3:35, Emily Johnston

English 128 (section 2) is a general education course that examines gender roles, norms, and stereotypes from a broad range of perspectives within the humanities across centuries and cultures. In this particular section of the course, we will interrogate gender roles, norms, and stereotypes through the lens of gender violence, primarily in the United States but also in other parts of the world as well. We will construct working definitions of “gender” and of “violence,” explore current forms and instances of gender violence, and inquire into our responsibilities and rights as global citizens and university members in confronting gender injustices. At the core of the course, in its content and in the way class will function, is respect for every being. Each participant will be responsible for making the course a respectful and meaningful learning experience for everyone. Assignments will include keeping a daily journal throughout the semester, daily reading assignments and reading quizzes, informal class presentations, and several course projects that involve research and writing, as well as other kinds of composition. Classes will be discussion based. Regular attendance and participation are essential!

Section 03, MW at 12:35, Barbi Smyser-Fauble

Section 04, MW at 2:00, Irina Nersessova

ENG 130 Survey of American Literature

A historical study of the main movements in American Literature. Readings of entire works representative of the movements will be included.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, Jeremy Hurley

This course will provide an overview of American literature from its beginnings to the present. Through an examination of selected literary texts of both canonical and non-canonical authors, this course will engage with a diverse body of works which are intended to expand student knowledge of important literary movements in American literature. Along with gaining a greater familiarity with important American literary works, students will also analyze how these works reflect or challenge contemporary social and cultural beliefs.

Required Texts:
Readings for the course will come primarily from the Norton Anthology of American Literature (shorter 8th edition). We will also read Stephen Crane’s Maggie: A Girl of the Streets and Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises. Any other required readings will be made available via Reggienet.

ENG 145 Writing in the Academic Disciplines (Sections 03-05,07-15)

Introduction to research-based writing for multiple academic audiences. Computer-assisted.

ENG 145.13 Writing in the Academic Disciplines (Sections 01-11, 13)

Introduction to research-based writing for multiple academic audiences. Computer-assisted.

ENG 160 Introduction to Studies in Women's Writing

Readings in a variety of genres and historical periods.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Kate Browne

This course will use autobiographical texts to explore the concept of disability broadly defined as physical, mental, and/or social constructs of impairment that affect quality of life. Texts for this class are intended to complicate the traditional understanding of disability as a diagnosis by investigating the ways in which disability is socially, culturally, and historically situated. In addition to the required texts, students will also read work by Audre Lorde, Nancy Mairs, Lauren Slater, Kate Bornstein, Gretchen Josephson, and Marya Hornbacher.

Required Texts
Ellen Forney. Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo, And Me: A Graphic Memoir. (2012)
Lucy Grealy. Autobiography of a Face. (2003)
Lesley Kinzel. Two Whole Cakes: How to Stop Dieting and Learn to Love Your Body. (2012)

ENG 165 Introduction to African-American Literature and Culture

Selected topics in African-American literature and culture.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Evan Nave

This course could be sub-subtitled: Hip-Hop Studies 101, as it will focus primarily on what Russell A. Potter considers the most recent African-American postmodern cultural and aesthetic movement. Throughout the semester we will explore Hip-Hop’s avant-garde tendencies through a variety of literary, musical, and cinematic texts. Students will be encouraged to (re)examine what Hip-Hop can mean to them as individuals, their communities, their nations, and their world(s). If Public Enemy’s Chuck D was on point by calling rap music “the black CNN,” this course will serve as a chance for us to see what’s been on the news and decide whether or not we need to change the channel or turn up the volume. In the end, we will hopefully come to better understandings of Hip-Hop’s myriad complexities, as well as its potential for artistic, intellectual, spiritual, social (and perhaps political and economic) liberation. 

Required Texts:

- That’s the Joint: The Hip-Hop Studies Reader, Eds. Murray Forman and Mark Anthony Neal
- And it Don’t Stop: The Best American Hip-Hop Journalism of the Last 25 Years, Ed. Raquel Cepeda
- Spectacular Vernaculars: Hip-Hop and the Politics of Postmodernism, Russell A. Potter
- Straight Outta Compton, Ricardo Cortez Cruz
- From Pieces to Weight, 50 Cent

Required Albums:

  • Paid in Full, Eric B & Rakim
  • It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back, Public Enemy
  • Straight Outta Compton, NWA
  • The Low End Theory, A Tribe Called Quest
  • Illmatic, Nas
  • Ready to Die, The Notorious B.I.G.
  • Me Against the World, Tupac Shakur
  • The Score, Fugees
  • Mos Def and Talib Kweli are Black Star, Black Star
  • Operation Doomsday, MF DOOM

ENG 170 Foundations in Literature for Children

Introduction to genres of children’s literature, including mythologies, fairy tales, picture books, poetry, and historical, multicultural, and current prose.

As the first course in the children's literature sequence at Illinois State University, ENG 170, Foundations in Literature for Children, is designed to serve as a general introduction to literature for those students studying children's literature. The course covers K-8th grade literature. The primary goal of the course is for students to learn to read literature using children's literature as texts.

The course focuses on children's texts for pre-readers and young readers, including picture books, chapters books, series books, novels, poetry and nursery rhymes, folklore, mythologies, information books and children's films at the K-8th grade level. Texts covered in the class include both canonical and noncanonical texts, recognized and recent children's texts, with attention to classics and multicultural texts, both historical and contemporary. Students in the class learn a range of conceptual materials as they are exposed to this wide variety of children's texts, including how to analyze genre, narrative and poetic form, ideology and issues of social construction, and introductory literary concepts.

Individual instructors order different texts for the section they are assigned to teach. Students enrolling in English 170 will generally be asked to purchase and read approximately 10-15 children's books for the course. While assessments may vary from section to section of English 170, they will include written papers, oral participation, quizzes, and examinations.

Section 01, MWF at 8:00, Amy Hicks

Section 02, TR at 8:00, Katy Stein

Section 03, MWF at 10:00, Jordana Hall

Section 04, MWF at 11:00, Elizabeth Williams

Section 05, MWF at 12:00, Scott Pyrz

Section 06, MWF at 1:00, Meghann Meeusen

Section 07, MW at 3:35, Niall Nance-Carroll

ENG 206 Cultural Expressions in Social Contexts: Women of Asia, Latin America and Africa

Interdisciplinary study of varieties of women's cultural expressions within distinct social contexts including comparitive emphasis on different regioins of concern.

Section 02, MW at 1:00, Rebecca Saunders

ENG 216 Studies in 18th Century English Literature

Selected writers and genres from the restoration of Charles II to the crown in 1660 to the beginnings of Romanticism.

Section 01, TR at 9:35, Katherine Ellison

How and why did the concept of intelligence emerge during the course of the seventeenth century and develop as a material and measurable human trait during the eighteenth, particularly as influenced by scientific, religious, political, and literary investigations of human behavior? What did it mean to be intelligent during the long eighteenth century (in our class, 1660-1800)? How are the concepts of grace, virtue, and even masculinity and femininity redefined during the period in terms of intelligence, and what skills became associated with being “smart”? And just as importantly, how have our categories of intellectual and mental disability been shaped by the later seventeenth and eighteenth centuries? What did it mean to be a “fool” or “the feeble-minded” or “the unteachable”?

This course will provide both canonical and noncanonical foundations in the literature – fiction, poetry, and drama as well as nonfiction and “informational” scientific and political writings – of an incredibly important period in the historical formation of intelligence and educational policy. We will read seminal texts like Locke’s Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Milton’s Paradise Lost, Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress, Dryden’s MacFlecknoe, Behn’s Oroonoko and History of the Nun, Vanbrugh’s hilarious The Relapse, Pope’s Rape of the Lock, Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe, Haywood’s Fantomina, and Sterne’s Tristram Shandy as well as disturbing tracts on physiognomy by Lavatar, on the concept of enlightenment by Kant, and excerpts from Boswell’s demonstration of alleged photographic memory, his London Journals. We will also read current work on cognition and accusations about the “dumbest generation” and survey how these concepts and literary texts influenced the future of education. We will consider the rise of meritocracy and the ways in which intelligence and standardized testing models have been rooted in theories and economic motives that are hundreds of years old. The semester will also include close consideration of the future of teaching eighteenth-century literature within a Common Core Standards classroom and is highly recommended to English Education majors.

ENG 218 Studies in the Victorian Period

Studies of texts from the 19th century.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Cynthia Huff

THIS COURSE IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED FOR ENGLISH EDUCATION MAJORS AND FULFILLS YOUR HISTORICAL BRIT LIT REQUIREMENT. IT ALSO WILL ADDRESS COMMON CORE STANDARDS NOW IN EFFECT FOR THE SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM

This course is interdisciplinary in nature and would benefit rhetoric, writing studies, linguistics, creative writing, and technical communications specialists.

Course Description:   In this course we will consider works by a diverse group of Victorian writers and place them within their historical, political, and social contexts. Not only will we examine writers who have been traditionally regarded as major figures, but we will also read lesser known writers, many of whom were popular during the era, to enhance our understanding of the complexity of Victorian culture and the many voices which contributed to lively debate about what it meant to be a Victorian. We will consider the various literary genres the Victorians used, including some, such as the verse novel, which are not familiar today, and we will talk about the expansion of the reading public, which meant that most literate Victorians knew well what we’ll read in this course. The course will be structured thematically and emphasize broad cultural constructs, such as Progress, Empire,  and the Woman Question, in an effort to familiarize students with the crucial debates in Victorian society so that they understand how these affect the production of literature and how literature influences the ways in which such issues were conceptualized. Basically, we will try to learn to read, as much as possible, as the Victorians might have read.

ENG 222 Studies in Shakespeare

Selected readings with emphasis on the relationship between the author, the text, and the larger culture.

Section 01, TR at 11:00, Hilary Justice

ENG 227 Introduction to Creative Writing

Opportunity for creative writing of various kinds, such as poetry, fiction, and nonfiction.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, Bryan Reid

Section 02, MW at 4:00, Kathryn Kerr

Section 03, TR at 9:35, Jamison Lee

Section 04, TR at 11:00, Kirstin Zona

Section 05, TR at 12:35, Kirstin Zona

Section 06, MW at 2:30, Duriel Harris

ENG 229 Introduction to Literary Genres

Formal and historical study of literary genres - poetry, drama, prose narrative - as structures of knowledge. Not for credit Major.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, Amato

Section 02, TR at 12:35, Paul Ugor

Section 03, MW at 2:00, Paul Ugor

ENG 231 American Literature: 1607-1830

Colonial American writers from the beginnings of American literature through the early national period.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, Susan Kalter

Those Unruly Americans: Bad Boys and Girls of the Eighteenth Century

The United States stakes itself upon its reputation, and the reputation of the United States and its precedent British colonies has always been one of transgression. Americans always have been and still are “not amenable to rule or discipline; ungovernable; disorderly, turbulent.” Or, at least, we always have been and still are seen as such and often enamored with seeing ourselves as such. We are metaphorically all sinners…in the hands of an angry god, or of a tyrannical Great Britain, or of a judgmental civil society. In this course, we will be reading works that exemplify America’s courtship with dangerous behaviors and even more dangerous ideas. Liberty. Gender equity. Democracy. From the diary of a man who sent witches and warlocks to death in the Salem witch trials, to a novel about a woman tilting at windmills to find the romantic love she only reads about in novels, we’ll look at how American writers from 1691-1812 negotiated the strictures of expectation. Whether they felt themselves judged and condemned by God or by the too-exacting morality of their peers or by their own consciences, whether they prophesied divine wrath against the slaveholder or trampled on sacred monarchies or defied the early nation-builders of an increasingly imperializing Federalism, they are tied together by the grand and contradictory and often hypocritical moral quest that came to define America. Can a nation establish itself as the beacon of good in the world while doing everything in its power to be bad?

ENG 239 Multimodal Composition

Workshop emphasizing rhetorical analysis and composition of digital texts in a variety of modes including graphics, typography, audio, video, animation. May be repeated; maximum 6 hours.

Section 01, MW at 3:35, Lisa Phillips

Multimodal composing is about being able to create meaning in a variety of ways using diverse tools so as to produce different kinds of rhetorical effects. In this workshop intensive class, we will engage with a wide variety of software programs and texts, but the most important thing we will engage is our own “wet-ware”—our minds. Of course, the mind and body function together to help us get things accomplished, and we’ll be considering how our rhetorics of sensation impact our multimodal composing practices. That is, we’ll think about the ways in which our sense perceptions influence our composing processes and production. In this course, we will read a variety of materials, analyze film production, evaluate sound, consider images, wonder about the term “digital,” and work toward a deeper understanding of our shared multimodal environments.


Specific things we’ll be exploring include film analysis though Mozilla’s Popcorn Maker, sound mapping through phone apps, image analysis through Google Earth, and website usability. As a final project we will have the opportunity to interact with students at different schools on an environmental mapping project. Students can choose any area to map that they wish using a number of modes and methods for production. You don’t need to have expertise in computer software programs.  You will be able to make mistakes, experiment, and learn in an open atmosphere.


Questions We’ll Consider:
What does multimodality really mean?
What does multimodal composition do to our thinking? That is, how is one mode different than another and what difference does it make and for whom?
How do we make sense of our multimodal environments, and how do we transmit that knowledge to someone else?


Possible Texts:

Adam Alter’s Drunk Tank Pink, And Other Unexpected Forces That Shape How We Think, Feel, and Behave

Cheryl Ball, Kristin Arola, and Jenny Sheppard’s Writer/Designer: A Guide to Making Multimodal Projects

ENG 241 Growth and Structure of the English Language

An introduction to the history of English designed to help students understand language change and the emergence of contemporary English.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, Susan Kim and K. Aaron Smith

ENG 243 The Grammatical Structure of English

Linguistic description of present day American English, focusing on morphology and syntax.

Section 01, MWF at 10:00, Susan Burt

Section 02, MWF at 1:00, Susan Burt

Section 03, TR at 12:35, Katie Nelson

ENG 244 Applied Grammar and Usage for Writers

Traditional, structural, and transformational grammars applied to needs of writers. Choosing among alternative grammatical strategies.

Section 01, MWF at 9:00, Marsha Sharp

ENG 246 Advanced Composition

Extensive writing of essays developed in greater depth and sophistication in subject matter than those written in previous writing courses. Computer-assisted.

Section 02, TR at 12:35, Amy Robillard

Section 03, TR at 2:00, Amy Robillard

Section 04, MW at 10:00, Bob Broad

ENG 247.01 Intermediate Creative Writing: Poetry

Workshop in the genre, with critical examination of its conventions.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, Francesco Levato

ENG 247.02 Intermediate Creative Writing: Fiction

Workshop in the genre, with critical examination of its conventions.

Section 01, MW at 1:00, Kass Fleisher

Section 02, TR at 2:00, Eric Longfellow

ENG 247.03 Intermediate Creative Writing: Creative Non-Fiction

Workshop in the genre, with critical examination of its conventions.

Section 01, MW at 12:35, Joe Amato

ENG 249 Technical and Professional Writing I

Introduction to technical and professional writing. Includes study of manuals, reports, proposals, audience analysis, formatting, and style.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, Barbi Smyser-Fauble

Section 02, TR at 9:35, Lee Brasseur

Section 03, MWF at 11:30, Arwa Malaibari

Section 04, TR at 11:00, Flourice Richardson

Section 05, MW at 11:00, Rob Rowan

Section 06, TR at 2:00, Flourice Richardson

ENG 250 Literature of the Bible 1

Major ideas and literary forms of the Hebrew Bible/Christian Old Testament.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, Jan Neuleib

ENG 254 Introduction to Professional Publishing

Study and practice of editorial, production, printing, and marketing processes involved with producing a book or journal.

Section 01, T at 1:00, Steve Halle

Section 02, W at 5:30, Jane Carman

IDS 254 Religions and Cultures

A critical examination of diverse religious discourses and literacies and how they construct and reflect identity based on cultural differences. May not be taken under the CT/NC option.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Jan Neuleib

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ENG 260 History of Literature by Women

A historical overview of writing by women.

Section 01, MW at 2:30, Kass Fleisher

ENG 267 Foundations of U.S. Latino/a Literatures and Cultures

Concepts, themes, genre conventions, and major historical events and figures significant in U.S. Latino/a literatures and cultures.

Section 01, MW at 12:35, Ana Roncero-Bellido

In this course, we will survey the development of Latina Feminisms as a reaction against hegemonic discourses dealing with race, class, gender and sexuality, among other identity categories. Thus, we will learn about major socio-historical contexts and events informing Latina Feminisms and U.S. Latina/o Histores, Literatures and Cultures. 

  To do so we will explore the meanings behind the Latino and Hispanic labels, the controversy they entailed, and how they relate to and affect U. S. Latinas and the development of Latina Feminisms. We will explore how the imposition of these labels shapes the experiences of Latinas and Latinos as inhabitants of the United States, particularly by focusing on how U.S. Latinas use writing and testimonial practices to give voice to their experiences. Hence, while the course makes a structural difference between Chicanas, Cubans, Puerto Ricans, Spaniards and Dominicans, we will also make emphasis on how these diverging, yet similar, experiences lead The Latina Feminist Group to use the term Latina as “a coalitional term.

ENG 271 Literature for Young Children

Analysis of works written for children ages 5 to 9, including multicultural picture books, fairy tales, poetry, and chapter books. Does not repeat material of ENG 170.

Section 01, MW at 10:00, Mary Moran

In this course, we will analyze a variety of works written for children ages 5 to 9, including multicultural picture books, fairy tales, poetry, and chapter books.

Section 02, MW at 2:00, Mary Moran

In this course, we will analyze a variety of works written for children ages 5 to 9, including multicultural picture books, fairy tales, poetry, and chapter books.

Section 03, TR at 2:00, Jan Susina

Required Texts:
M.C. Waldrep, ed. Favorite Fairy Tales: 27 Stories by Brothers Grimm, Andersen,
  Perrault and Others. Dover.
Hans Christian Andersen.  The Little Mermaid & Other Fairy Tales. Dover.
Jon Scieszka & Lane Smith. The True Story of the Three Little Pigs By A Wolf. Puffin.
Joseph Jacobs, ed. The Fables of Aesop. Dover.
Arnold Lobel. Frog and Toad Are Friends. Harper Collins.
Blanche Fisher Wright, ed. The Real Mother Goose. Cartwheel.
Beatrix Potter. The Complete Adventures of Peter Rabbit. Puffin.
Margaret Wise Brown. Goodnight Moon. Harper Trophy.
Crockett Johnson. Harold and the Purple Crayon. Harper Collins.
Dr. Seuss. The Cat in the Hat. Random House.
Maurice Sendak. Where the Wild Things Are. Harper Trophy.
Barbara Kerley. The Dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins. Scholastic.
A.A. Milne. Winnie-the-Pooh. Puffin Modern Classics.
Beverly Cleary. Ramona the Brave. Avon Camelot.
Jennifer & Matthew Holm. Babymouse: Our Hero. Random House.
Molly Bang. Picture This: How Pictures Work. SeaStar Books.

Course Description:
This children’s literature course examines texts that are appropriate for readers and pre-readers between the ages of five-to-nine years old.  The course will examine wide variety of children’s texts including fairy tales, fables, pictures books, nursery rhymes & poetry, music, television programs, films, nonfiction, graphic novels, and chapter books that have been created for or given to young children.  The course will consider how children understand these texts and examine the ways that children’s books help to create and ideologies and assumptions concerning young children and childhood.

Course Format:

Each student in the course will write a research paper (7-10 pages) on a children's picture book and a shorter paper (3-pages) on a children's film.   During the semester, there will be a series of in-class and homework assignments linked to the reading assignments.   Regular attendance and active participation in class discussion is expected.

ENG 272 Literature for Middle Grades

Analysis of works written for children ages 9 to 13, including multicultural novels and information books, children’s media, and culture. Does not repeat material of ENG 170.

Section 02, TR at 9:35, Roberta Trites

Section 03, TR at 3:35, Karen Coats

This course focuses on texts written for “tweens.” This semester, we will emphasize the importance of telling a good story in both fiction and nonfiction. We will look at how stories are structured to draw us in, and what they do once they’ve hooked us, such as help with identity formation, ground us in our history and culture, and help us develop a sense of ethics, among other things.

  • Bloor, Edward, Tangerine
  • Brown, Don, The Great American Dust Bowl
  • Curtis, Christopher Paul, The Watsons Go to Birmingham, 1963: A Novel
  • Dowell, Francis O’Roark, The Kind of Friends We Used to Be
  • Dulemba, Elizabeth O., A Bird on Water Street
  • Gaiman, Neil, The Graveyard Book
  • Gaiman, Neil, Coraline
  • Grimes, Nikki, Planet Middle School
  • L’Engle, Madeleine, A Wrinkle in Time
  • Osborne, Linda Barrett, Miles to Go for Freedom: Segregation and Civil Rights in the Jim Crow Years
  • Rowling, J. K., Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone
  • Schlitz, Laura Amy, Splendors and Glooms
  • Stone, Tanya Lee, Almost Astronauts
  • Turnage, Sheila, Three Times Lucky

  • Format of Course: We will read and discuss one text per week, supplementing our reading of primary literature with theoretical articles. Students will keep a daybook, write an analytical paper, and complete a multimodal research project.

    ENG 283 Rhetorical Theory and Applications

    Critical and analytical examination of the nature and historical development of rhetorical theory and its applications to contemporary discourse.

    Section 02, MW at 3:35, Julie Jung

    ENG 284 Poetry

    Critical and analytical examination of the nature and historical development of poetry.

    Section 01, TR at 11:00, Gabe Gudding

    ENG 285 Drama

    Critical and analytical examination of the nature and historical development of drama as a genre.

    Section 01, TR at 12:35, Robert McLaughlin

    This course will serve as an introduction to drama as a genre. We will read and discuss a number of plays, mostly twentieth-century and contemporary, representing a range of styles. Among the authors I anticipate our reading are Shakespeare, Ibsen, O’Neill, Beckett, Pinter, Genet, Glaspell, Williams, Albee, Fugard, Wilson, Ives, and Reza. I also anticipate reading in the theory of drama.

    Class meetings will be discussion-based. Each student will be responsible for one research presentation. There will be three three-five-page essays and one six-ten-page research-based essay. Students will be required to attend a play.

    ENG 286 Prose

    Critical and analytical examination of the nature and historical development of prose literature - fiction and non-fiction.

    Section 01, TR at 9:35, TBA

    Section 02, TR at 11:00, TBA

    ENG 287 Independent Study

    Section 01, ARR

    ENG 289.30 Introduction to English Education

    This course is designed to introduce students to foundational concepts and issues associated with the teaching of high school English in diverse settings.

    Section 01, MW at 9:35, Eileen Bularzik

    Section 02, TR at 11:00, Eileen Bularzik

    ENG 289.31 Writing, Mediation and Technology

    Section 01, TR at 12:35, Tim Hunt

    By and large in English Studies we pay a great deal of attention to what we often term texts but largely ignore the mechanisms (books and the like) that store and convey these texts to us.  Books are, it seems, simply containers for writing, and as such matter little.  But books (and newer modes of textual storage and transmission) are complex systems of mediation that have changed over time (and continue to change) in response to emerging technologies and changing social conditions.

    In this course we will consider how attending to books as historically situated and technologically inflected meditational systems

    • can enhance our understanding of how writing and texts have functioned in the past,
    • can help us understand how writing and texts function at present,
    • can give us contexts and tools for exploring the increasing centrality of digital technology and considering how the dynamics of writing and texts may develop in the coming decades.

    This course is designed to provide historical and theoretical frames of particular importance for students interested in Publishing Studies, students interested in New Media Studies, and students emphasizing Writing Studies.

    Texts (tentative):
    An Introduction to Book History, Finkelstein & McCleery
    The Book History Reader, ed. Finkelstein & McCleery
    3-4 literary case studies drawn from the early modern period to the present

    ENG 290 Language Arts

    Study of language acquisition and research in critical thinking, listening, speaking, writing, vocabulary development, usage, and spelling for children.

    Section 01, TR at 12:35, Eileen Bularzik

    ENG 295 Teaching Literature and Writing in the Middle School

    Surveys recent scholarship on composition and literary theory and examines implications for teaching literature and writing at the middle school level.

    Section 01, TR at 2:00, Paula Ressler

    English 295 is a course about teaching reading/literature and writing/language study to early adolescents. We will consider ways of creating effective classroom communities for learning and of designing reading and writing activities that engage students in real-world literacy tasks. We will focus on a holistic perspective that recognizes the importance of student choice and collaboration. We will consider various issues in adolescent literature, process approaches to teaching writing, appropriate ways of working with language and conventions, and authentic forms of assessment.

    ENG 296 The Teaching of Literature

    Examines current scholarship in the teaching of literature at the secondary level; integrates theories of teaching literature with teaching practice. Includes Clinical Experiences: 10 hours, Type 1-5 and 9.

    Section 01, M at 5:00, Julie Cheville

    This course focuses on teaching literature as part of an integrated English Language Arts curriculum that supports adolescents’ development of multiple literacies. Methods addressed in the course include instructional practices that support decoding, comprehending, and evaluating multimodal texts of increasing difficulty and complexity. Key assignments in the course include strategy-based interventions to support reading development, as well as thematic and multi-genre literature units. The use of essential questions as a frame for the design of inquiry-based lessons and units will be a predominant focus.

    Section 02, TR at 11:00, Lisa Thetard

    This course focuses on teaching literature as part of an integrated English Language Arts curriculum that supports adolescents’ development of multiple literacies. Methods addressed in the course include instructional practices that support decoding, comprehending, and evaluating multimodal texts of increasing difficulty and complexity. Key assignments in the course include strategy-based interventions to support reading development, as well as thematic and multi-genre literature units. The use of essential questions as a frame for the design of inquiry-based lessons and units will be a predominant focus.

    ENG 297 The Teaching of Writing

    Examines current scholarship in the teaching of writing at the secondary level; integrates theories of teaching writing with teaching practice. Includes Clinical Experiences: 26 hours, Type 1-5 and 9.

    Section 01, TR at 11:00, Sarah Hochstetler

    This course helps teacher candidates shape individual theories, practices, and philosophies in the teaching of writing for secondary students. Though the primary goal is to prepare candidates to teach writing, other goals include transitioning into the profession (moving from thinking like a student to thinking like a teacher) as well as learning to be a reflexive practitioner. To this end, the course includes assignments such as facilitations of readings (including discussions online); curriculum development (creating and presenting a lesson plan, and creating a unit plan with appropriate assessment tools); directed observation and analysis of effective teaching (both of veteran teachers and ourselves); and professional writing (drafting, revising, and publishing for your peers).

    Section 02, TR at 12:35, Sarah Hochstetler

    This course helps teacher candidates shape individual theories, practices, and philosophies in the teaching of writing for secondary students. Though the primary goal is to prepare candidates to teach writing, other goals include transitioning into the profession (moving from thinking like a student to thinking like a teacher) as well as learning to be a reflexive practitioner. To this end, the course includes assignments such as facilitations of readings (including discussions online); curriculum development (creating and presenting a lesson plan, and creating a unit plan with appropriate assessment tools); directed observation and analysis of effective teaching (both of veteran teachers and ourselves); and professional writing (drafting, revising, and publishing for your peers).

    ENG 299 Independent Honors Study

    Section 01, Arrange

    ENG 300 Senior Seminar

    Capstone course for English majors, synthesizing the main dimensions of English studies. Requires senior project and portfolio.

    Section 01, MW at 1:00, Brian Rejack

    Section 02, MW at 2:30, Brian Rejack

    Section 03, TR at 2:00, Hilary Justice

    Section 04, TR at 5:00, Ricardo Cruz

    ENG 341 Introduction to Descriptive Linguistics

    Aims and methods of linguistic science. Nature and functions of language: phonology, morphology, syntax, variation. Relationship of language to culture.

    Section 01, TR at 2:00, Katie Nelson

    Section 02, TR at 3:35, Katie Nelson

    ENG 345 Tesol Methods and Materials

    Methodologies and techniques for teaching English as a Second Language; evaluation of materials for various levels and instructional goals.  Includes clinical experience.

    Section 01, MW at 9:35, Lisya Seloni

    Section 02, MW at 2:00, Lisya Seloni

    ENG 346 Testing in ESL

    Assessing oral and written proficiency in English as a Second Language.

    Section 01, MW at 2:00, TBA

    Section 02, MW at 3:35, TBA

    ENG 347.01 Advanced Creative Writing - Poetry

    Workshop format for individual projects; related theory.

    Section 01, TR at 3:35, Gabe Gudding

    ENG 347.03 Advanced Creative Writing - Non-Fiction

    Workshop format for individual projects; related theory.

    Section 01, MW at 3:35, Joe Amato

    ENG 349 Technical Writing II

    Instruction and practice in editing, proposals, and analytical writing; attention given to style manuals, research writing, and (as needed) publication. Computer-assisted.

    Section 01, TR at 12:35, Angela Haas

    Section 02, M at 5:30, Lee Brasseur

    ENG 350 Visible Rhetoric

    Document design as a rhetorical activity and the application of theories of visible rhetoric to document production. Computer assisted.

    Section 1, MW at 2:00, Elise Hurley

    In this writing-, reading-, analysis-, and production-intensive course, we will explore how visual elements work in an array of primarily visual texts (broadly defined) as they are located within various rhetorical, social, and cultural contexts. Specifically, we will explore and interrogate notions of visibility by focusing on the following:

  • What does visibility mean?
  • How are primarily visual texts rendered, created, and designed to be visible? For what purposes and audiences? In other words, how do these texts “work”?
  • Who has the privilege of seeing and looking? Who (or what) gets to be seen or looked at?
  • What (or who) is rendered invisible? Why?
  • In order to explore these questions, we will draw from the interdisciplinary field of visual rhetoric and locate lines of inquiry within English studies, rhetoric and composition, professional and technical communication, graphic design, visual culture and cultural studies, advertising, art history, psychology, and others.

    Throughout the semester, we will read, critique, analyze, and produce a variety of visual texts. You are not required to have any expertise using digital technologies, though a willingness to explore, experiment (and yes, make mistakes) with readily available composing technologies is essential.

    ENG 351 Hypertext

    Workshop using digital technologies to compose complex, multimodal, web-based texts for a variety of rhetorical situations. Computer-assisted.

    Section 01, MWF at 1:00, Jim Kalmbach

    Hypertext to me means nonlinear reading and writing. Over the years, students and I have explored this non-linearity in a variety of forms. Most recently, the class has taken on a distinctly web 2.0 turn. In particular, we will look at the impact of template culture on reading and writing, that is how templates are shaping people’s reading and writing on the web, and what you can do to critically resist that shaping.

    We explore these ideas through readings and responses and through a series of projects. Students first create a web site with a content management system--WordPress and then recreate that website in Dreamweaver. Students then, as a final project, complete a major web publishing project in any area of web culture that interests them using any method of production.

    Graduate students in the class complete an additional project, and I offer a good deal of flexibility in shaping that project to fit there interests and program.

    Textbooks
    Beaird, Jason. (2007). The Principles of Beautiful Web Design. Sitepoint, ISBN 098057689X
    Redish, Ginny. (2007). Letting Go of the Words. Morgan Kaufman. ISBN 0123694868

    ENG 354 Literary Publishing in Theory and Practice

    Focus on issues that have shaped contemporary literary publishing.

    Section 1, TR at 9:35, Robert McLaughlin

    This course will examine the field of literary publishing in the United States as a mechanism of mediation between authors and readers.  The focus will be on the history of publishing with special emphasis on how changing technology has reframed a set of ongoing issues (risk of publication, copyright, censorship, marketing, distribution, and so on).  We will also examine some case studies in the relationship among author, text, and editor.

    Class meetings will be discussion-based.  Each student will participate in a collaborative research presentation.  There will be four three-page essays and one research-based essay.

    Texts I anticipate using include:

    Nicole Howard, The Book: The Life Story of a Technology
    Eugene Exman, The House of Harper
    Siva Vaidhyanathan, Copyrights and Copywrongs
    Ted Striphas, The Late Age of Print
    John B. Thompson, Merchants of Culture
    Lance Olsen, Theories of Forgetting

    ENG 357 Theories of Creative Writing Genesis

    Survey of theories creative writers explicitly and implicitly employ and consider. Includes editing, analysis, and writing of creative and theoretical texts.

    Section 1, TR at 12:35, Gabe Gudding

    ENG 365 African American Literature

    Advanced critical study of major movements and periods in African-American literature.

    Section 01, TR at 3:35, Chris De Santis

    DESCRIPTION OF COURSE:
    An exploration of major African American texts of the nineteenth- and early-twentieth centuries and the ideological and practical maps and blueprints they offered readers to navigate the violence and contradictions of a compromised democracy and begin the work of rebuilding a nation that lived up to the ideals on which it was founded.

    Possible Texts (Subject to change before start of semester):

    Autobiographical and Fictional Texts

  • Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave
  • Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
  • Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Iola Leroy
  • Booker T. Washington, Up From Slavery
  • Paul Laurence Dunbar, The Sport of the Gods
  • W. E. B. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk
  • Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God
  • Langston Hughes, The Ways of White Folks
  • Richard Wright, Black Boy
  • Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man


  • Critical, Historical, and Theoretical Texts
  • Henry Louis Gates, Jr., The Signifying Monkey
  • Eric Lott, Love and Theft: Blackface Minstrelsy and the American Working Class
  • Grace Hale, Making Whiteness: The Culture of Segregation in the South, 1890-1940
  • Houston Baker, Blues, Ideology, and Afro-American Literature: A Vernacular Theory
  • Robert Stepto, From Behind the Veil


  • FORMAT OF COURSE:
    Lecture/Discussion

    ENG 374 Storytelling

    The art of storytelling based on knowledge of folklore heritage with experiences in oral transmission of literature in a variety of settings.

    Section 01, T at 5:30, Karen Coats

    Stories and storytelling are foundational to human experience. We tell stories to preserve our individual and cultural memories, share experience, and project possible futures. Our first way of understanding the world is through story, and we continue to use story to explain the world to ourselves, to explain ourselves to others, and to explain ourselves to ourselves. In this class, we will approach storytelling from multiple angles: from theories of why we tell stories and why and how we respond to them, to examinations of how stories work in literature and everyday life, and finally, to techniques of how we can shape and tell stories in effective, entertaining, and multimodal ways.

    Texts:

  • Lipman, Doug, Improving Your Storytelling: Beyond the Basics for All Who Tell Stories in Work and Play
  • Gottschall, Jonathan, The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human
  • Gregory, Marshall, Shaped by Stories
  • Pratchett, Terry, The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents
  • Other readings will be made available through the English Department Digital Reserves.
  • Format:
    In addition to reading and engaging in class discussion about the nature of storytelling, students will develop and perform a variety of types of stories, including folk tales, traditional stories, and various kinds of personal narratives.

    ENG 375 Young Adult Literature

    Advanced critical examination of literature for young adults with emphasis on trends and research. May repeat if content different.

    Section 1, TR at 9:35, Jan Susina

    Required Texts:
    Tavi Gevinson, ed. Rookie Yearbook One. Drawn and Quarterly.
    Sonya Sones. What My Mother Doesn't Know. Simon Pulse.
    Chip Kidd. Go: A Kidd’s Guide to Graphic Design. Workman Publishing.
    Rachel Cohn & David Levithan.  Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist. Knopf.
    William Shakespeare. A Midsummer’s Night Dream, ed. Russ McDonald. Penguin.
    John Green. Looking for Alaska. Speak.
    J.D. Salinger. The Catcher in The Rye. Little Brown.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby. Notes & Preface by Russ McDonald. Penguin.
    Harper Lee. To Kill A Mocking Bird. Warner Books.
    John Lewis. March: Book 1. Top Shelf.
    Ray Bradbury. Farenheit 451. Simon & Schuster.
    Suzanne Collins. The Hunger Games. Scholastic.

    Course Description:
    This course will emphasize reading of young adult literature and consider how such texts fit into the broader realm of adolescent culture.  The course will trace the development of the genre of adolescent literature and examine the representation of adolescence and adolescent concerns in these texts.  Readings will include books written specifically for adolescents, books selected and read by adolescents outside of school, and books that are assigned to adolescents in the high school.  In addition to reading a variety of literary genres—fiction, poetry, drama, graphic novel, and nonfiction—the course will also address other influential elements of adolescent popular culture including film, music, websites, and television programs that all contribute to teens understanding of themselves and their place in the world.

    Course Format:
    Students will write one research paper (7-10 pages), while graduate students will write a longer research paper (12-15 pages) on an adolescent text or some aspect of adolescent culture.  All students will write a short film analysis (3-5 pages). A midterm and final exam will be given as well as reading quizzes and short assignments based on the reading throughout the semester. Graduate students will have the opportunity to lead a class discussion.  Regular attendance and active participation in class discussion is expected.

    Section 2, TR at 11:00, Jan Susina

    Required Texts:
    Tavi Gevinson, ed. Rookie Yearbook One. Drawn and Quarterly.
    Sonya Sones. What My Mother Doesn't Know. Simon Pulse.
    Chip Kidd. Go: A Kidd’s Guide to Graphic Design. Workman Publishing.
    Rachel Cohn & David Levithan.  Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist. Knopf.
    William Shakespeare. A Midsummer’s Night Dream, ed. Russ McDonald. Penguin.
    John Green. Looking for Alaska. Speak.
    J.D. Salinger. The Catcher in The Rye. Little Brown.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby. Notes & Preface by Russ McDonald. Penguin.
    Harper Lee. To Kill A Mocking Bird. Warner Books.
    John Lewis. March: Book 1. Top Shelf.
    Ray Bradbury. Farenheit 451. Simon & Schuster.
    Suzanne Collins. The Hunger Games. Scholastic.

    Course Description:
    This course will emphasize reading of young adult literature and consider how such texts fit into the broader realm of adolescent culture.  The course will trace the development of the genre of adolescent literature and examine the representation of adolescence and adolescent concerns in these texts.  Readings will include books written specifically for adolescents, books selected and read by adolescents outside of school, and books that are assigned to adolescents in the high school.  In addition to reading a variety of literary genres—fiction, poetry, drama, graphic novel, and nonfiction—the course will also address other influential elements of adolescent popular culture including film, music, websites, and television programs that all contribute to teens understanding of themselves and their place in the world.

    Course Format:
    Students will write one research paper (7-10 pages), while graduate students will write a longer research paper (12-15 pages) on an adolescent text or some aspect of adolescent culture.  All students will write a short film analysis (3-5 pages). A midterm and final exam will be given as well as reading quizzes and short assignments based on the reading throughout the semester. Graduate students will have the opportunity to lead a class discussion.  Regular attendance and active participation in class discussion is expected.

    ENG 384 Introduction to Cultural Theory

    Introduction to the history and practice of cultural theory.

    Section 01, MW at 2:00, Julie Jung

    Undoing Normalcy: Theory for Accessible Cultures


    “An accessible society, according to the best, critically disabled perspectives, is not simply one with ramps and Braille signs on ‘public’ buildings, but one in which our ways of relating to, and depending on, each other have been reconfigured.” —Robert McRuer


    This course will engage and forge intersections between theoretical scholarship in disability, feminist, and queer studies for purposes of understanding how beliefs about what it means to “be normal” are culturally constructed and thus open to contestation and revision. We will begin by studying the concepts of “culture” and “normalcy” as interrelated rhetorical phenomena. We will then read scholarly texts that theorize how ideologies of normalcy function to privilege some and do violence to others. We will also examine how theorists, creative writers, documentary filmmakers, and performance artists speak back to the hegemony of normalcy by undoing its definitional assumptions. While undertaking this aforementioned work, we will pay particular attention to the ways in which normalcy is reproduced and contested in and through visual texts and technologies as well as acts of visual perception. The primary goal of our inquiry will be to learn ways of thinking and doing that (to paraphrase Robert McRuer) radically reconfigure what it means to relate to and depend upon one another.

    Required Texts

  • Davis, Lennard J., ed. Disability Studies Reader, 4th ed. (available as an e-book via Milner)
  • Garland-Thomson, Rosemarie. Staring: How We Look
  • Kafer, Alison. Feminist, Queer, Crip
  • McRuer, Robert. Crip Theory: Cultural Signs of Queerness and Disability
  • Padden, Carol A., and Tom L. Humphries. Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture
  • Serano, Julia. Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity
  • Warner, Michael. The Trouble with Normal: Sex, Politics, and the Ethics of Queer Life
  • Documentary films: Vital Signs: Crip Culture Talks Back and Through Deaf Eyes
  • ENG 394 TESOL Practicum

    Observation, case studies, tutoring, instructional assistance, and some teaching experience in English as a Second Language.

    Section 01, W at 1:00, Lisya Seloni

    ENG 398 Professional Practice: Internship in English

    Supervised field experience in English with local, state, national, and international businesses, agencies, institutions (including colleges and universities), and organizations.

    Section 01, Arranged, Jim Kalmbach

    Information about internships is available at http://english.illinoisstate.edu/undergrad/internships/index.shtml

     

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