2016 - 2017 Graduate Course Offerings

For the most current schedule information, please visit the University's Course Finder.

Summer 2017

ENG 341 Introduction to Descriptive Linguistics

Aims and methods of linguistic science. Nature and functions of language: phonology, morphology, syntax, variation.

Section 01, MTWR 11:00, 4 weeks beginning 6/5/2017, K. Aaron Smith



ENG 375 Young Adult Literature

Advances critical examination of literature for young adults with emphasis on trends and research.

Section 01, MTWR at 11:00, 4 weeks beginning 5/22/2017, Jan Susina

This course will emphasize reading of young adult literature with attention to the analysis of literary representation of the stages of adolescence and adolescent concerns. The course traces the development of the genre of adolescent literature and will investigate thematic and stylistic changes found in such texts. In addition to reading a variety of literary genres – fiction, poetry, drama, graphic novel – written specifically for adolescents, books read by adolescents, and books that are assigned to adolescents in the classroom. Students will develop a detailed proposal for research paper with an annotated bibliography on an adolescent text or some aspect of adolescent culture. All students will write a film analysis, create a cannon of young adult literature, and complete a mixed tape/CD project. A final exam will be give at the end of the course and regular reading quizzes on the reading will be given throughout the course. Given the concentrated nature of this four-week summer school course, attendance at every class session is required as is active participation in class discussion.


ENG 378 London on Stage: Shakespeare & Company

English course for graduate study abroad in London, UK

Section 01, 6 weeks beginning 5/22/2017, Tara Lyons



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ENG 409.06 Teaching of Writing in High School/Middle School: The Writing Project

Improving the quality of writing instruction in middle and high schools.

Section 01, MTWRF at 9:00, 3 weeks beginning 7/10/2017, Jan Neuleib



ENG 498 Professional Practice: Internship in English

Supervised field experience in English with local, state, national, and international businesses, agencies, institutions (including colleges and universities), and organizations.

Section 01, arrange, Elise Hurley



ENG 510 Seminar in English Studies Pedagogy

Research and study of pedagogical theory in post-secondary English Studies with emphasis on developing self-reflexive pedagogy.

Section 01, hybrid MTWR at 9:00, 4 weeks starting 5/22/2017, Karen Coats

This course is a hybrid in at least two senses: First, we will be meeting both face-to-face and online, with a schedule that will be decided corporately in our first meetings. The goal of this format will be to experience and reflect on the different affordances of online and face-to-face pedagogies. The second hybrid aspect of the class will consist in its blend of theoretical and practical facets of teaching at the university level. We will begin by considering a theory of pedagogical desire that reveals the often conflicting motivations, goals, and needs of the three players in the educational game: you as an instructor, your students, and the institution. We will then consider how to develop rationales, learning objectives, assignment sequences, and assessments that operate as effectively as possible in traditional and online environments given those conflicting goals. Each student will be able to bring these theoretical and practical considerations to bear on their own particular focus within English Studies. Auditors welcome.
Required Text:
Radical Pedagogy: Identity, Generativity, and Social Transformation
Articles as assigned    



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Fall 2016

Please note this listing is of courses from a previous semester. Check back closer to your registration date to see descriptions for upcoming courses.



ENG 332 Selected Figures in American Literature

Topics in literary figures, genres, or movements. May repeat if content differs.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Tim Hunt

The Beat Generation

In the mid-1950s the publication of Ginsberg’s Howl and Kerouac’s On the Road helped catalyze awareness of—and a good deal of hysteria over—what the press labeled a “Beat Generation.”  We are still trying to come to terms with the nature and significance of this seeming cultural rupture and with work of the Beats.  This course will examine a range of primary Beat texts—those by such usual suspects as Jack Kerouac (On the Road), Allen Ginsberg (Howl & Other Poems), and William Burroughs (Naked Lunch) along with the works by less widely known, but significant Beat and Beat-related writers as Diane DiPrima, Ted Joans, Bob Kaufman, and Brenda Frazier—to interrogate the practice of the Beat writers, their problematic relationship to the containment culture of the Cold War, their cultural impact, and their varying (confused and confusing) institutional receptions.  Please note: this is not a course in (to co-opt Ed Sanders’ title) “Tales of Beatnik Glory”; it is a course in which we will consider the nature and significance of Beat literature as literature, which paradoxically means considering how, why, and in what ways the Beats sought to subvert and reinvent the category of literature as it was then constructed.

FORMAT OF COURSE:
Discussion



ENG 341 Introduction To Descriptive Linguistics

Aims and methods of linguistic science. Nature and functions of language: phonology, morphology, syntax, variation.

Section 02, MWF at 11:00, Susan Burt

REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS:
Harrison, K. David.  2007.  When Languages Die.  Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press.

McGregor, William.  2009.  Linguistics: An Introduction.   London and New York: Continuum.

Students should make certain to have a copy of the McGregor text by the first day of class.

DESCRIPTION OF COURSE:

This course introduces students to various components of language description, including morphology, phonetics and phonology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. While the focus of many English department classes is often on text, in this course, we will focus much of our attention on talk as well.  Students should plan on a workload that includes frequent quizzes, three exams, a short paper, and reading assignments. Without taking this course it is impossible to lead a full, rich life.

 

FORMAT OF COURSE:  Lecture-discussion. Students taking the course for graduate credit should meet with the instructor early in the semester to select a research topic and choose a date for a short research presentation in class.



ENG 345 TESOL: Methods and Materials

Methodologies and techniques for teaching English as a Second Language; evaluation of materials for various levels and instructional goals. Includes Clincical Experiences.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Hyun-Sook Kang

The purpose of this course is to raise your understanding and awareness of the developmental stages and needs of English language learners in various learning contexts. This course also aims to help you adjust, modify, and manipulate instructional techniques and materials to accommodate the linguistic and cognitive needs of English language learners in learner-centered classrooms.

You will:
1. understand and critically evaluate different theories, hypotheses, models, and research findings in second language learning by way of the assigned readings, lectures, in-class discussions, and reflection papers.
2. identify and understand the linguistic and cognitive developmental stages English language learners pass through in various learning contexts by way of the assigned readings, lectures, and in-class discussions.
3. create and develop instructional techniques and materials to accommodate the linguistic and cognitive developmental stages of English language learners, drawing upon your understanding of the theories and approaches to second language learning.


ENG 346 Assessment and Testing in ESL

Assessing oral and written proficiency in English as a Second Language.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Hyun-Sook Kang

This course will provide an introduction to basic principles and current and innovative approaches in the assessment and testing of English as a second or foreign language in various instructional contexts. We will be familiar with the various options we have for preparing or adapting tests, and to understand test construction as a process, which is woven into the fabric of curriculum development and classroom instruction. Once we have discussed a model for the process of test construction, we will apply this knowledge to evaluating currently available tests and further relate language testing to educational and social policies. The procedure of test preparation, administration, rating and interpretation, and the use of computer technology in language testing will be addressed.

The goals of this course include:
- To gain a good understanding of the terminology and fundamental concepts of language testing and test construction.
- To be able to select and construct test items, tasks, and test types that are appropriate for a given situation, and to use alternative forms of assessment in the classroom, in addition to (or in place of) traditional achievement tests.
- To gain knowledge of identification, placement, exiting, and monitoring of English language learners, and of supporting them both in and outside of the schools.


ENG 347.01 Advanced Creative Writing - Poetry

Workshop format for individual projects; related theory.

Section 01, M at 5:30, Duriel Harris

Attending to poetry as the art of language (in prose and verse) and poetics as necessary interrogations surrounding making, this studio/workshop/seminar will function as a dynamic space for interrogation, discovery, and experimentation in the generation and presentation of new work in multiple media. Over the course of the term we will explore the enduring questions that fuel speculative arts (“What if?;” “If only?;” and “If this continues?”). Embracing the innovative potential of the speculative, we will re-imagine the scientific, the fantastic, the futuristic, the magical, the horrific, and the fabulist—while meeting the demands of the literary. We will experiment with making via a variety of commonly accessible technologies including but not limited to: social media platforms; and open source software for word processing and slide presentations, and video and audio editing. Android smartphones/tablets and MAC iPhones/iPads welcome but not required.



ENG 349 Technical Writing II

Instruction and practice in editing, proposals, and analytical writing; attention given to style manuals, research writing, and (as needed) publication. Computer assisted.

Section 01, TR at 11:00, Angela Haas

Section 02, TR at 3:35, Angela Haas



ENG 353 Technical Editing

Theory and practice of editing and management of documentation in industry and other organizational settings. Computer assisted.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, Lee Brasseur



ENG 355 Forensic Bibliography

History of print culture from orality to digital text; introduction to principles and practices of bibliographic investigation and scholarly editing.

Section 01, MW at 3:35, TBA



ENG 357 Studies in Creative Writing

Survey of theories creative writers explicitly and implicitly employ and consider. Includes editing, analysis, and writing of creative and theoretical texts.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, Gabriel Gudding



ENG 360 Studies in Women's Writing

Studies in and theories of women’s writing.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Cynthia Huff

REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS:

Fuchs & Howes, Teaching Life Writing Texts
Carolina Maria de Jesus, Child of the Dark
Herculine Barbin, Herculine Barbin (diary)
Gloria Anzaldúa, Borderlands/La Frontera
Mary Gordon, The Shadow Man
Anne Moody, Coming of Age in Mississippi
Marjane Satrapi, Persepolis

DESCRIPTION OF COURSE:

This course focuses on the diversity of women's autobiographical expression historically, cross-culturally, and generically. We'll interrogate the similarities/differences between types of life writing discourse such as diaries, essays, testimonio, graphic life writing and historical/cultural narrative, and ask how the assumed/implied audience, the historical period, multiple voices, the geographical location, as well as issues of race, class, age, ability, sexual orientation, and relationship affect women's autobiographical acts. We'll question whether the term autobiography fits women's practices, consider if the term life writing is more appropriate, and discuss what distinctions between autobiography and biography or literature seem meaningful.

Because life writing extends across the boundaries of English Studies as well as transgresses the boundaries of other disciplines to include art, history, and psychology, for example, it’s ideal for thinking about how and why we read texts and considering teaching strategies. This course will ask how reading a variety of women’s life writing texts helps us learn about ourselves as critical consumers and about others’ lives, and suggest some strategies for  how to teach life writing. This course is ideal for anyone who ever wanted to think about how his/her life might be written, to investigate how different women have written their lives, to explore how you might convey the dynamics of a life to anyone who wants to think about how important living a life is.

Because a major component of the course is pedagogical, it fulfills the pedagogy requirement for graduate students. Because of its emphasis on teaching, it is also ideal for undergraduate education majors. It also is an elective for the Women and Gender Studies minor.

This course is interdisciplinary in nature and would benefit rhetoric, writing studies, linguistics, creative writing, and technical communications specialists.

FORMAT OF COURSE:

The class will be primarily discussion with background material supplied when necessary. There may be pop quizzes from time to time. Each of you will keep your own course autobiography in which you'll situate yourself in relationship to four of the major texts we read, as well as comment on what life writing questions/issues that major text suggests and how these might illuminate pedagogy. Each entry should be 1-2 typed whole pages; a Works Cited page is required but may not be counted in the total number of pages; entries on earlier texts cannot be turned in after a course autobiography due date has passed. A research paper of 15-20 typed whole pages illuminating a text or life writing aspect perhaps suggested by your class autobiography will be required. If you prefer, you can create a life writing project in lieu of a more traditional research paper but this will need to be approved by me. Your research paper/project should deal in some way with pedagogy so that you link the reading and critique of life writing texts to strategies for teaching them. Graduate students will be expected to write a research paper/construct a project of 20-25 typed whole pages, and to generate an annotated bibliography of at least 10 whole pages and at least ten critical/theoretical secondary sources. Works Cited pages are required for the research paper but are not part of the required number of pages.



ENG 374 Storytelling

The art of storytelling based on knowledge of folklore heritage with experiences in oral transmission of literature in a variety of settings.

Section 01, M at 5:30, Karen Coats

Stories and storytelling are foundational to human experience. We tell stories to preserve our individual and cultural memories, share experience, and project possible futures. Our first way of understanding the world is through story, and we continue to use story to explain the world to ourselves, to explain ourselves to others, and to explain ourselves to ourselves. In this class, we will approach storytelling from multiple angles: from theories of why we tell stories and why and how we respond to them, to examinations of how stories work in literature and everyday life, and finally, to techniques of how we can shape and tell stories in effective, entertaining, and multimodal ways.
Texts:
Lipman, Doug, Improving Your Storytelling: Beyond the Basics for All Who Tell Stories in Work and Play
Gottschall, Jonathan, The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human
Gregory, Marshall, Shaped by Stories
Pratchett, Terry, The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents
Other readings will be made available through ReggieNet.
Format:
In addition to reading and engaging in class discussion about the nature of storytelling, students will develop and perform a variety of types of stories for multiple purposes .



ENG 375 Young Adult Literature

Advanced critical examination of literature for young adults with emphasis on trends and research.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Mary Jeanette Moran

A wide variety of experiences marks the transition from childhood to adulthood through that mysterious stage known as adolescence.  In this class, we’ll focus on the question of how young people learn to make mature ethical decisions.  Of course, this approach necessitates guidelines about what it means to make “mature ethical decisions.”  Therefore, as background to our analysis of literature, we’ll start by reading two groundbreaking studies of moral development by Lawrence Kohlberg and Carol Gilligan.  Kohlberg proposes that the highest level of morality is the ability to make decisions according to universal principles; Gilligan suggests an alternative model in which moral decision-making must take into account the relationships among particular individuals and the communities in which they live.  We’ll use these ideas to investigate novels from various time periods and subgenres, all written for and about young adults, with protagonists who explore their responsibilities to self, particular others, and community.  Texts will include Laurie Halse Anderson’s Speak, Benjamin Alire Saenz’s Dante and Aristotle Discover the Secrets of the Universe, and Philip Pullman’s The Golden Compass.  Most of our classes will be devoted to discussion, though we will also use class time for writing and for peer workshopping; students should expect to be actively engaged in their learning during each class.  In addition to thoughtful and interactive participation, student responsibilities will include a day of leading discussion and three papers (a 3-4 page paper and an 8-10 page paper for all students and a final paper of 10-12 pages for undergraduates, 15-25 for graduate students).

Section 02, MW at 3:35, Mary Jeanette Moran

A wide variety of experiences marks the transition from childhood to adulthood through that mysterious stage known as adolescence.  In this class, we’ll focus on the question of how young people learn to make mature ethical decisions.  Of course, this approach necessitates guidelines about what it means to make “mature ethical decisions.”  Therefore, as background to our analysis of literature, we’ll start by reading two groundbreaking studies of moral development by Lawrence Kohlberg and Carol Gilligan.  Kohlberg proposes that the highest level of morality is the ability to make decisions according to universal principles; Gilligan suggests an alternative model in which moral decision-making must take into account the relationships among particular individuals and the communities in which they live.  We’ll use these ideas to investigate novels from various time periods and subgenres, all written for and about young adults, with protagonists who explore their responsibilities to self, particular others, and community.  Texts will include Laurie Halse Anderson’s Speak, Benjamin Alire Saenz’s Dante and Aristotle Discover the Secrets of the Universe, and Philip Pullman’s The Golden Compass.  Most of our classes will be devoted to discussion, though we will also use class time for writing and for peer workshopping; students should expect to be actively engaged in their learning during each class.  In addition to thoughtful and interactive participation, student responsibilities will include a day of leading discussion and three papers (a 3-4 page paper and an 8-10 page paper for all students and a final paper of 10-12 pages for undergraduates, 15-25 for graduate students).



ENG 385 Life Writing/Narrative in Theory and Practice

Theoretical and practical consideration of interdisciplinary field of life writing/narrative. Textual production and reception, representation, rhetoric, memory, narrative, genre.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, Amy Robillard

What are the stories we tell ourselves in order to live? Where do they come from? How do we revise them as we grow and change? How are they shaped by the stories others tell about themselves? In this course, we will address questions such as these as we study contemporary theories of life writing and histories of autobiography, memoir, and the personal essay. We will consider these questions, along with the central question of the course—Why write a life?—from the perspectives of both readers and writers. We’ll read the lives of others at the same time that we workshop our own life writing. We’ll discuss the simplistic critiques of life writing as confessional, as narcissistic, as deceptive or fraudulent, and we’ll think through the cultural and emotional content of such critiques in order to articulate, a bit less hyperbolically, the purposes and functions of life writing in the first part of the twenty-first century.

Required texts
D’Ambrosio, Charles. Loitering: New and Collected Essays. Portland: Tin House Books, 2014.
Daum, Meghan. The Unspeakable. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 2014.
Karr, Mary. The Liars’ Club. New York: Penguin, 1995. 2005 10th anniversary edition.
Karr, Mary. Lit. New York: Harper Perennial, 2010.
Mann, Lucas. Lord Fear. New York: Pantheon, 2015.
Smith, Sidonie, and Julia Watson. Reading Autobiography. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 2010.
Ward, Jesmyn. Men We Reaped. New York: Bloomsbury, 2013.
Wolff, Tobias. This Boy’s Life. New York: Grove Press, 1989.



ENG 394 TESOL Practicum

Observation, case studies, tutoring, instructional assistance, and some teaching experience in English as a Second Language.

Section 01, W at 1:00, Hyun-Sook Kang

The TESOL Practicum offers students seeking an endorsement in TESOL the opportunity to acquire clinical hours while observing and participating in ESL instruction in an Illinois public school. The Practicum also offers graduate students pursuing the graduate certificate in TESOL the opportunity to obtain clinical experience in a local adult ESL center. Students should have completed at least two of the TESOL courses (343, 344, 345, 346) in addition to the prerequisite to these (391) before enrolling in 394, since the assignments in this course will require students to use the concepts discussed in those courses to structure their observations.

This practicum is intended to provide you with focused observation of teachers of English to non-native speaking learners, practice for you in teaching such learners and an opportunity to view and evaluate yourself as a teacher, and an opportunity for you to provide a service to both the TESOL profession as well as to a specific community of learners. Much of the work for the course will be completed as an independent study during which you will organize, manage, and complete observations, tutorials, etc. on your own.


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ENG 400 Independent Study

Directed independent study in an area of English Studies.



ENG 401 Introduction to Graduate Study

Introduction to bibliography, mehtods of research, critical evaluation of scholarship, and recent developments in literary theory and criticism.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Katherine Ellison

A course introducing graduate studies should be a practical as well as theoretical foreword to the methodologies and professions of advanced scholarship in English. This semester, it is also an exploration of the existential and affective stakes of pursuing knowledge and laboring within an institution of higher education for self-fulfillment – and employment – either within or beyond the bookshelf and the classroom. We will discuss the weight of the “shoulds” of graduate study – what you should be doing, what you should be reading, what you should be writing – with the emotional, intellectual, and even physical consequences, navigating the “whys” and “hows” (Why am I really doing this? Why do I want to teach? How will I balance work and family? How will I stay healthy?). Practically, we will discuss, and complete exercises aligned with, the trajectory of the graduate and postgraduate career, from researching the archives to theorizing to networking to conferencing to publishing in diverse genres and media to reviewing to job hunting to working to paying off debt, and we will talk honestly about all the things we as academics must manage on a uniquely squeezed timeline: students, research, service, family, finances, and health. Theoretically, we will survey the present state of English Studies and the questions and concerns that characterize the disciplines represented in our graduate program, with attention to the strengths of our faculty and the structure of our curriculum. Personally, we will also pay attention to the preservation of your own wellness, sharing strategies for staying focused on what is important to you, those you love, your students, and your discipline.


ENG 402 Teaching Composition

Introduction to theory, research, and practice in the teaching of composition.

Section 01, W at 5:30, Bob Broad & David Giovagnoli



ENG 403 Poetics

Study of theories, techniques, and cultural contexts of poetry and poets, emphasizing historical and sociological perspectives.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, Gabriel Gudding

This course will not be limited to the study of poetry and matters attendant to it. Instead, the course, following the broadest meaning of poiesis as making, will investigate current theories and practices pertinent to the production of contemporary fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and hybrid writing. The course will survey and critically examine the latest thought in literary and cultural theory relevant to the creation of literature within these genres. Areas of chief concern will be narratology, aesthetics and the rhetoric of aesthetics, neurocrit, zoopoetics and zoocriticism, new materialism, digital humanities, as well as a few specific areas in recent moral philosophy, social psychology, paracolonialism, and sociology as they relate expressly to literary production.


ENG 417 Studies in Romantic British Literature

Selected movements, genres, or authors such as Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats.

Section 01, R at 5:30, Brian Rejack

Romanticism and Mobile Texts

Long before we used the term “texts” to refer to the messages that we frantically tap out on our magical twenty-first-century devices, texts such as books, pamphlets, letters, and a wide variety of other printed material were likewise mobile. During the Romantic period in Britain (roughly 1780-1830), textual objects moved around with such rapidity and concentration that it became commonplace to remark about the situation as did William Wordsworth in 1800, that the “rapid communication of intelligence” had served to “blunt the discriminating powers of the mind,” or as William Hazlitt wrote of the amount of periodical writing in 1823, “the concrete mass is too voluminous and vast to be contained in any single head […] We have collected a superabundance of raw materials.” In short, during the Romantic period there were lots of texts. But what also matters is that they moved. Texts only become valuable, dangerous, effective, affective—and all the other remarkable things they can become—once they circulate. This course approaches Romanticism as a literary historical period through the assumption that we need to understand not only what texts say, but how they move. As such, the theoretical and methodological underpinnings of the class rest in media studies and book history. Even though our temporal location will be the early-nineteenth century, the course should be of interest to students working in media studies more broadly (including new media). The course should also appeal to students interested in life writing (many of our texts will be letters, personal essays, memoirs, etc.), the relation between politics and literature (one focus will be the pamphlet wars surrounding the outbreak of the French Revolution), the history of globalization (texts as instruments of—and mechanisms for challenging—empire), and transnational literary studies (texts didn’t just move in Britain!).

Some of our readings will include: Mary Wollstonecraft’s Letters Written in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark and Vindication of the Rights of Woman; Helen Maria Williams’s Letters Written in France; John Keats’s epistolary writing; arctic exploration narratives, including that of John Franklin’s final, disastrous voyage; Leonora Sansay’s Secret History; or, The Horrors of St. Domingo; and selections from Letitia Elizabeth Landon’s poetry.



Eng 440 Studies in English Linguistics

Advanced study and research in various aspects of the English language.

Section 01, MWF at 9:00, Susan Burt

REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS:

Duffy, John M. 2007.  Writing from These Roots: Literacy in a Hmong-American Community. Honolulu: University of Hawai’i  Press.

Dunn, Mark.  2001.  Ella Minnow Pea: A Novel in Letters.  New York: Anchor Books.

Lippi-Green, Rosina.  1997. English with an Accent: Language, ideology and discrimination in the United States.  London and New York: Routledge. Yeah, yeah, get the second edition….

Schieffelin, Bambi, Kathryn Woolard and Paul Kroskrity (eds.) 1998.  Language Ideologies: Practice and Theory.  New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press.

And there will be other readings as well, possibly in a Pip’s packet or on electronic reserve.

DESCRIPTION OF COURSE:

This section of English 440 will focus on language ideologies.  A fictional polity’s devastating language ideology is explored in the dystopic novel Ella Minnow Pea.  With readings from the Schieffelin volume, we will explore the anthropological approach to language ideologies (which are never only about language). We then explore in depth the language myths and ideology of the United States, including its manifestations in school classrooms, in English With an Accent (Rosina Lippi-Green).  We will continue with an ethnography of literacy, Writing from These Roots (John M. Duffy), which shows how immigrants to the United States acquire literacy and a new language, and learn to argue against discourses and ideologies that would position them as perpetual outsiders. 

FORMAT OF COURSE:

Classes will focus primarily on discussion of the readings.  There will probably be a midterm exam and at least one term paper.



Eng 447.02 Creative Writing Seminar: Prose

Practice in the writing of fiction for graduate level or professional writers.

Section 01, MW at 3:35, Joe Amato

This course will employ a time-tested formula: read, write, repeat. Readings will consist of a reasonable amount of (prose) literature. A reasonable amount of (prose) writing will be required. Discussion will be centered on how, and how well, a given reading or workshop submission achieves its ostensible aims, which will require an appraisal of what works, and what doesn’t, and why. The occasional contexts for our discussion will include literature as an artistic practice, the publishing industry, creative writing in higher education, the history of writing, the job market, the writing life, and our shared moment in cultural time.


ENG 470 Studies in Children's Literature

Topics in texts for children and adolescents: genres, authors, critical approaches, themes, or historical developments.

Section 01, W at 5:30, Jan Susina

Author & Illustrator as Critic

 Children’s book authors and illustrators, in addition to crafting memorable texts for young readers, are often insightful critics of children’s and young adult literature.   This seminar will examine the critical writing of a wide range of children’s authors and illustrators from the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries.  Readings will include critical essays by Lewis Carroll, J.M. Barrie, C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, Virginia Lee Burton, Dr. Seuss, E.B. White, Beverly Cleary, Jean Fritz, Ursula Le Guin, Virginia Hamilton, Myra Cohen Livingstone, Katherine Patterson, Maurice Sendak, David Macaulay, Walter Dean Myers, Jon Scieszksa, John Green, and J.K. Rowling.  The seminar will also read of a selection of Newbery & Caldecott Medal speeches, and Zena Sutherland lectures.    The seminar will examine several children’s Künstlerroman, in which the protagonist addresses the challenges of becoming a writer or an artist.  These will include: Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women, Louise Fitzhugh’s Harriet the Spy, Crockett Johnson’s Harold and the Purple Crayon, E.B. White’s Charlotte’s Web, Beverly Cleary’s Dear Mr. Henshaw, and Andrew Clements’s The School Story. Students will choose an influential children’s author or illustrator and edit a collection of that person’s essays, speeches, and interviews.

Tentative Booklist:
William Zinsser, Ed. Worlds of Childhood: The Art and Craft of Writing for Children
Maurice Sendak. Caldecott & Co.: Notes on Books & Pictures
Walter Hooper, Ed.  C.S. Lewis On Stories and Other Essays on Literature
Arnold Adoff, Ed. Virginia Hamilton: Speeches, Essays, & Conversation
Katherine Paterson. A Sense of Wonder: On Reading and Writing Books for Children
Beverly Cleary. On My Own Two Feet
Ursula Le Guin. Language of the Night: Essays on Fantasy & Science Fiction
Myra Cohn Livingston. Climb Into the Bell Tower: Essays on Poetry
Bestsy Hearne, Ed.  The Zena Sutherland Lectures 1983-1992
Leonard Marcus, Ed. Show Me A Story: Why Picture Books Matter
Louisa May Alcott.  Little Women
Crockett Johnson.  Harold and the Purple Crayon
E.B. White. Charlotte’s Web
Louis Fitzhugh. Harriet the Spy
Beverly Cleary. Dear Mr. Henshaw
Andrew Clements. The School Story



ENG 482 Studies in Literary Criticism and Theory

Problems or topics in literary criticism and theory.

Section 01, TR at 11:00, Chris Breu

Description: This course will provide a broad survey of literary criticism and theory. In contrast to other theory classes (like 384 for example) the focus of this course will be specifically on literary theory and criticism. The course will begin with Aristotle and Plato and then move forward in time to provide a comprehensive survey of various established literary-theoretical approaches, including narratology, psychoanalysis, Marxism, postcolonialism, critical race theory, feminism, gender theory, queer theory, structuralism, poststructuralism, etc. The last half of the course will be devoted to readings from a range of contemporary, twenty-first century criticism. This contemporary work will include literary-theory readings in new materialisms, animal studies, biopolitics, affect theory, new media theory, as well as new work in older theoretical traditions (such as Marxism and queer theory). Students should leave the class with a broad and comparative knowledge of literary theory, with a command of various narratological approaches to literature, with an understanding of how to both historicize and spatialize literary and cultural production, and with an understanding of contemporary debates and approaches to the study of literature and culture.
Texts:
The Norton Anthology of Literary Theory and Criticism, Second Edition. Edited by Vincent B. Leitch, William E. Cain, Laurie A. Finke, Barbara E. Johnson, John McGowan, T. Denean Sharpley-Whiting, Jeffrey J. Williams.
The Narrative Reader. Edited by Martin McQuillan.
These two texts will be supplemented by on-line readings, especially when we turn to contemporary developments and trends.
Organization: The course will be a seminar, in which both reading and discussion are required. There will be an oral/written presentation and a final paper.    



ENG 498 Professional Practice: Internship in English

Supervised field experience in English with local, state, national, and international businesses, agencies, institutions (including colleges and universities), and organizations.



ENG 499 Master's Thesis



ENG 500 Independent Study

Directed independent study in an area of English Studies.



ENG 560 Seminar in Literature and Culture

Research in selected areas of literary and/or cultural study framed within the contexts of pedagogy and English Studies.

Section 01, R at 5:30, Tara Lyons



ENG 590 Seminar in Rhetoric and Composition Studies

Research in the configurations of rhetoric and composition studies, with emphasis on English Studies and the post-secondary teaching of writing.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, Amy Robillard

The subtitle of one of the required books for this course, Joseph Harris’s Rewriting, is How to Do Things with Texts. If I had to give this section of the Seminar in Rhetoric and Composition Studies a title, I might revise Harris’s subtitle just a bit and call it How and Why We Do Things With Texts. Of course, Harris’s title is an allusion to J. L. Austin’s How to Do Things with Words, and in that allusion and in my revision of Harris’s subtitle are acknowledgements of influence. This seminar will take as its subject both the disciplinary identity of the field of composition and rhetoric and the questions of how and why we do things with texts. Students will become familiar with the history and formation of the field and the contemporary scholarship and future directions of the field. At the same time, we will consider larger questions of what it means to write, to be, in Wallace’s words, Compelled to Write, for audiences both academic and non-academic, and to be increasingly defined by the texts we’ve read, the texts we’ve written, the texts that influence, even haunt us.

Required texts:

Note: There will also be a number of articles not represented here.

Brandt, Deborah. The Rise of Writing: Redefining Mass Literacy
Harris, Joseph. Rewriting: How to Do Things with Texts
Horner, Bruce. Rewriting Composition: Terms of Exchange
Miller, Susan. The Norton Book of Composition Studies
Wallace, David L. Compelled to Write: Alternative Rhetoric in Theory and Practice



ENG 591 Practicum (Internship) in College Teaching

Teaching of lower-division English courses with emphasis upon new techniques; under faculty direction, at Illinois State University or off campus; in conjunction with tutorial meetings. Prerequisite: completion of doctoral course work.



ENG 599 Research and Dissertation

Research involving the gathering of materials and data and the writing of a dissertation.



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Spring 2017

ENG 320 Chaucer

Literary and linguistic study of the major works of Chaucer; text in Middle English.

Section 01, TR at 11:00, Susan Kim



ENG 341 Introduction to Descriptive Linguistics

Aims and methods of linguistic science. Nature and functions of language: phonology, morphology, syntax, variation.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, K. Aaron Smith



ENG 343 Cross-Cultural Issues in TESOL

THe relationship between language, culture, and cultural awareness in the learning and teaching of English as a Second Language.

Section 01, MWF at 9:00, Susan Burt

REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS:

Helen Spencer-Oatey 2008.  Culturally Speaking: Culture, Communication and Politeness Theory.   London and New York: Continuum.

There will also be a course packet, available at Pip’s in the Bone Student Center.

DESCRIPTION OF COURSE:

The goal of communicative language teaching is to equip learners to be able to interact gracefully and effectively with native speakers of the target language.  Knowledge of grammar and lexicon alone will not equip learners adequately for these out-of-classroom tasks.  This course examines the cultural and pragmatic aspects of language- and culture-learning, from the perspectives of interactional sociolinguistics and intercultural and cross-cultural pragmatics.  We will explore one area in depth, the area of speech act realization, through a cooperative research project.  The results of research in this area lead us back to the classroom, where implications for pedagogy and materials will be explored.

FORMAT OF COURSE:

Classes will follow the lecture-discussion format.  There will be a midterm exam, a final exam, a research presentation and a research paper, both based on the cooperative research project.  In addition, graduate students will prepare an annotated bibliography in connection with the final paper.



ENG 344 TESOL: Theoretical Foundations

Linguistic theories: first and second language acquisition; cognitive, affective, and cultural factors in teaching English as a Second Language.

Section 02, MW at 2:00, Hyun-Sook Kang

Course Description
This course will introduce key concepts and issues in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages). Topics to be covered include the nature of first and second language acquisition, linguistic, cognitive, affective, and socio-cultural factors in developmental processes and learning outcomes, and the role of input and instruction in language learning. The course will provide opportunities to critically evaluate a variety of approaches to TESOL and research findings. Class discussion will further attempt to make implications for language teaching in the classroom and beyond.

Course Objectives
In this course, students will:
1. Learn the fundamental concepts and principles of the knowledge base pertaining to the learning of English as a second or foreign language;
2. Learn to critically evaluate second language learning theories and engage in a systematic investigation of the knowledge base to inform their own or others' teaching practices; and
3. Learn how to plan and manage a second language class effectively and how to evaluate and selectively apply a range of teaching strategies as appropriate to their students' needs and characteristics

Required Textbooks:
Ortega, L (2009). Understanding second language acquisition. New York, NY: Routledge.


ENG 347.02 Advanced Creative Writing: Prose

Workshop format for individual projects; related theory.

Section 01, TR at 9:35, Ricardo Cruz



ENG 348 Playwriting

Playwriting techniues of selected masters with practical application of techniques in writing original plays.

Section 01, M at 5:30, Paula Ressler

Join English, theater, and other majors working together and sharing their skills and ideas to create a rich interdisciplinary experience. No playwriting, theater, or acting experience is required. You can take this course for either English or Theater credit.

In this course, everyone will write a 10-minute play, a work-in-progress, that we will produce. The plays will be cast with students in the class and other volunteers in a showcase at the end of the semester when each play will receive constructive feedback from audience members and invited guests. In addition to writing plays, we will read samples of successful 10-minute plays and discuss what professional playwrights can teach us about the craft.

This class is an opportunity for people who already know how exciting it is to write for live theater and for those who want to find out. You will get a sense of this amazingly collaborative art form as we work together during the semester to say what is meaningful to us and what will matter to others, writing in a genre that can’t help but generate new life energy.



ENG 349 Technical Writing II

Instruction and practice in editing, proposals, and analytical writing; attention given to style manuals, research writing, and (as needed) publication.

Section 01, M at 5:30, Lee Brasseur



ENG 350 Visible Rhetoric

Document design as a rhetorical activity and the application of theories of visible rhetoric to document production.

Section 01, TR at 11:00, Elise Hurley

Section 02, TR at 2:00, Elise Hurley



ENG 358 Topics in Publishing Studies

Topics in specific theories, histories, trends, methodologies, practices, or figures in publishing.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Tara Lyons

Textbook Publishing and Digital Editions: What Really Helps Students Learn Shakespeare?

Over the past decade, digital editions of Shakespeare’s works have sprung up across the textbook market. While many of these editions have been designed for use in the undergraduate classroom, Shakespeare instructors across the U.S. and U.K. are wondering how “going digital” will affect students’ learning. Our goal in ENG 358 is to “test-drive” these new editions and evaluate their design and pedagogical value from a variety of perspectives: the textbook publishing industry, Shakespeare textual studies, and literature pedagogy.

In course readings, discussions, and assignments, ENG 358 will explore how textbooks shape students’ experiences with literature. We will ask: How have rising costs in education influenced the textbook market? How do publishers conceive of “access” to digital textbooks? How have shifts in Shakespeare studies influenced the content of new editions? How can textual editors help make Shakespeare’s works accessible to modern readers? What do twenty-first century students need from their textbooks and what specifically do they need from them to learn Shakespeare? Each student in the course will research, design, and conduct a study that investigates how learning Shakespeare is mediated by digital and print textbooks. No prior coursework on Shakespeare is required. Undergraduate and graduate students in publishing, literary studies, secondary education are especially welcome.



ENG 372 Studies in Contemporary Literature for Young People

Advanced critical examination of 20th and 21st century literature for children and young adults with emphasis on trends and research.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Jan Susina

Spring 2017
English 372 Contemporary Literature for Young People/ Origins of Modern Literature for Young People. Tues. & Thurs. 12:35- 1:50 p.m.
Professor: Jan Susina

Description:
This course is intended to introduce students to growth of modern British and American children's literature during the last one hundred years.  The course will also take occasional look back significant earlier children’s texts that influenced modern and contemporary writers for children.  This course will examine the changing concepts of childhood and how children's books help to establish an ideology of childhood.  The course will focus primarily on influential children’s texts from the Anglo-American tradition that have been published during the twentieth and twenty-first century.  The course will also introduce students to a variety of critical approaches to children's literature and examine the development of the criticism of children's literature as an academic field. Undergraduates will be required to write one short research paper (8-10 pages), while graduate students will write one short paper (8-10 pages) and one longer critical paper (15-18 pages).   In addition, all students will write a book analysis (3-5 pages) on a significant illustrated children’s text selected from a list provided by the instructor.   A midterm exam and a final exam will be given. Graduate students will have the opportunity to lead class discussion on one of the assigned texts. All students will be expected to regularly attend class, and actively contribute to class discussion. The course should be of interest to students working in Children’s Literature, Education, Popular Culture, Visual Studies, and American Studies.

Required Texts:
L. Frank Baum.  The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.  Dover Evergreen Children’s Classics.
Lewis Carroll. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Dover Thrift Edition
Andrew Lang, ed. The Blue Fairy Book. Dover.
Jon Scieszka.  The Stinky Cheeseman and Other Fairly Stupid Tales. Illustrated by Lane Smith.
Puffin Books.
Beatrix Potter. The Complete Adventures of Peter Rabbit. Puffin.
A.A. Milne.  Winnie-the-Pooh.  Illustrated by Ernest Shepard. Puffin.
Quentin Blake, ed. The Penguin Book of Nonsense Verse. Penguin
Dr. Seuss.  The Cat in the Hat. Random House.
Margaret Wise Brown.  Goodnight Moon.  Illustrated by Clement Hurd.  Harper Collins.
Crockett Johnson. Harold and the Purple Crayon. Harper Collins.
E.B. White.  Charlotte’s Web.  Illustrated by Garth Williams. Harper Collins.
Ezra Jack Keats. The Snowy Day.  Puffin.
Maurice Sendak.  Where the Wild Things Are. Harper Collins.
Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women, ed. Elaine Showalter. Penguin.
Judy Blume. Are You There God, It’s Me Margaret? Delacorte Books.
S.E. Hinton. The Outsiders. Speak.
J.K. Rowling.  Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. Illustrated by Mary Grandpre. Scholastic.



ENG 375 Young Adult Literature

Advanced critical examination of literature for young adults with emphasis on trends and research.

Section 01, TR at 9:35, Niall Nance-Carroll

Section 02, M at 5:30, Karen Coats

Psychologists and cultural critics agree that adolescence is a sociocultural phenomenon, the experience of which is highly dependent on the values, material goals, and affluence of a particular society.  It is a time for negotiating identity in the matrix of discourses of gender, race, nationality, ethnicity, technology, spirituality, embodiment, and ethics. But recent research on adolescence indicates that the experience of adolescence is also a biological one: teens have distinct ways of thinking and feeling that are related to the structure and growth of their brains. What stories, then, do contemporary authors of young adult literature tell, and how do they affect and influence a readership that is biologically predisposed to lead with their emotions while they are actively engaged in sorting out their identities and their values? To approach these questions, we will be reading books and viewing films that inspire strong emotional responses and/or produce a “shallowness of affect” while also asking readers to think about contemporary issues such as the growth in surveillance culture (dust off your Foucault), what it means to be white/black/brown/straight/gay/male/female/zombie/drunk /dying/autistic/other, and who gets to decide what such identity categories mean anyway. The theoretical orientation of the class is a synthesis of neuropsychoanalysis, cognitive poetics, cultural theory, and multimodal engagement.  
Required Texts:
Alexie, Sherman, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-time Indian
Brosgol, Vera, Anya’s Ghost
Heppermann, Christine, Poisoned Apples: Poems for You, My Pretty
Lockhart, E., The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks
Meehl, Brian, You Don’t Know About Me
Smith, Andrew, The Alex Crow
Stewart, Martin, Riverkeep
Tharp, Tim, The Spectacular Now
Watson, Renée, This Side of Home
Wood, Fiona, Cloudwish
Yang, Gene Luen, Boxers & Saints (boxed set)
Yeahpau, Thomas M., X-Indian Chronicles: The Book of Mausape
Bend it Like Beckham
(film we will watch in class)
Me, Earl, and the Dying Girl (film we will watch in class—bring tissues)
Theory readings as assigned (available on ReggieNet)



ENG 384 Introduction to Cultural Theory

Introduction to the history and practice of cultural theory.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Paul Ugor

This course is an introduction to the expansive interdisciplinary field of cultural theory. We will examine the foundations of cultural theory in Marxism, Psychoanalysis, Semiotics, Postmodernism, Feminism, Eco-criticism, Postcolonialism, and Queer Studies. Our primary focus will be the specific ways in which cultural theory has radically shifted cultural and critical analysis away from abstract Universalist discourses to a much more grounded (material), contemporary (present-day) and every day (ordinary) life. Essentially, the course will serve as a crucial guide to the most important theories in the arts, humanities and the social sciences. The course will be especially useful for students in the field of literary and cultural studies, communication studies, visual cultures, theatre and performing arts, ethnic, gender, queer, and postcolonial studies.


ENG 394 TESOL Practicum

Observation, case studies, tutoring, instructional assistance, and some teaching experience in English as a Second Language.

Section 01, W at 1:00, Hyun-Sook Kang

Course goals: 
The TESOL Practicum offers students seeking an endorsement in TESOL the opportunity to acquire clinical hours while observing and participating in ESL instruction in an Illinois public school.  The Practicum also offers graduate students pursuing the graduate certificate in TESOL the opportunity to obtain clinical experience in a local adult ESL center.  Students should have completed at least two of the TESOL courses (343, 344, 345, and 346) in addition to the prerequisite to these (391) before enrolling in 394, since the assignments in this course will require students to use the concepts discussed in those courses to structure their observations.  

This practicum is intended to provide you with focused observation of teachers of English to non-native speaking learners, practice for you in teaching such learners and an opportunity to view and evaluate yourself as a teacher, and an opportunity for you to provide a service to both the TESOL profession as well as to a specific community of learners.  Much of the work for the course will be completed as an independent study during which you will organize, manage, and complete observations, tutorials, etc. on your own.  

Required texts will be available on the course management system 



ENG 396 The Writing Seminar

Concentration upon a major writing project and the formulation of an individual Writing Portfolio.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, Jeremy Hurley



ENG 398 Professional Practice: Internship in English

Supervised field experience in English with local, state, national, and international businesses, agencies, institutions(including colleges and universities), and organizations.

Section 01, Arrange, Jim Kalmbach



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ENG 400 Independent Study

Directed independent study in an area of English Studies.

Arrange with instructor.



ENG 409.01 Major Figures in Teaching Writing in High School/Middle School

Improving the quality of writing instruction in middle and high schools.

Section 01, S at 9:00, Bob Broad

Course Number:  ENG 409.01
Course Title:  Major Figures in the Teaching of Writing
Professor:  Bob Broad
Credit Hours:  3
Meeting Time:  (every other) Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 2:50 p.m.
Meeting Place:  STV 410 (and the STV 408 computer lab)
Reference No.: 

Required books:
Elbow, Peter.  Embracing Contraries: Explorations in Learning and Teaching.  New York: Oxford UP, 1987. (ISBN: 978-0195046618)  Approx. cost: $20 paperback.
---. Everyone Can Write: Essays toward a Hopeful Theory of Writing and Teaching Writing.  New York: Oxford UP, 2000.  (ISBN: 978-0195104165)  Approx. cost: $30 paperback.
---. Writing with Power.  2nd ed.  New York: Oxford UP, 1998.  (ISBN: 978-0195120189) Approx. cost: $14 paperback.  (Date of publication for the first edition was 1981.)
---. Writing without Teachers.  2nd ed. (25th-anniversary edition.)  New York: Oxford UP, 1998.  (ISBN: 978-0195120165)  Approx. cost: $15 paperback. (Date of publication for the first edition was 1973.)

Recommended books:
Belanoff, Pat, and Peter Elbow.  A Community of Writers: A Workshop Course in Writing.  3rd ed.  New York: McGraw-Hill, 1999.  (ISBN: 978-0073031811)
Elbow, Peter.  Vernacular Eloquence: What Speech Can Bring to Writing.  New York: Oxford UP, 2012.  (ISBN: 978-0199782512)
---.  What is English?  New York: MLA, 1990.  (ISBN: 978-0873523820)

[Please note:  This list of required and recommended texts is subject to revision until the start of the semester.] 

Description of Course
As a matter of practical, historical, and educational fact, Peter Elbow may be the writer and thinker most influential on the teaching of writing in the United States (and, perhaps, beyond) from 1975 to the present (2016). This does not mean that he is always right, and there have been dozens who have challenged and critiqued Elbow in a variety of ways (in this course we will read the work of several of those critics). Still, as perhaps the most prominent advocate of the theory and pedagogy of writing that has (to Elbow’s chagrin) popularly been called expressivism, Elbow surely looms large among contemporary “major figures in the teaching of writing.”

In this course, we will read much writing by Peter Elbow and also a fair amount of writing about Elbow’s work. Participants in the course should expect to research and compose a piece of original research in the genre of the professional journal article. These pieces of original research will be considered for publication (along with an afterword from Peter Elbow and an introduction by Bob Broad) in a proposed special issue of the Illinois English Bulletin.  

Peter Elbow has also tentatively agreed to join the class discussion periodically via video-conference.

Format of Course
Like other classes in the “Teaching Writing in High School and Middle School” (Eng. 409.0X) series, this course is designed specifically for the benefit of teachers of writing in secondary (middle-school and high-school) English classrooms.  Educators from other subject positions are also welcome, as long as they will benefit from and contribute productively to a course designed for secondary English teachers of writing. We will educate ourselves regarding relevant theory and research, and integrate that learning into highly focused and “usable” research projects.  In general terms, our activities and projects in and outside of class will include:  Reading assigned texts and writing in a response journal (reflective writing-to-learn); class discussions and activities; and individual research projects.

Participants in the class will assemble, groom, and present their own course portfolios (by default, electronic) to promote and document their learning.  They should finish the course ready to publish their finished research projects for the benefit of their fellow teachers of writing. 


Planned Meeting Dates

Following are the dates currently planned for class meetings. These planned meeting dates are open to negotiation and revision by the professor and the graduate students. However, such negotiations and revisions usually end up in a stalemate because a change that is good for one person is typically bad for another.

Given our format (eight six-hour meetings), it’s obviously important and best if everyone attends every class. If you must miss one meeting, that is academically survivable. Missing more than one class meeting is not academically survivable. If your missing a part of one of our meetings is unavoidable, I encourage you to attend whatever part you can on that day.

  • January 28
  • February 11
  • February 25
  • March 11 (first day of ISU’s spring break)
  • March 25 (first day of Unit 5 and District 87 spring break)
  • April 8
  • April 22
  • May 6 (last day of classes at ISU)
  • [No final exam meeting]


ENG 418 Studies in Victorian British Literature

Authors in the period 1832-1901, such as Browning, Carlyle, Tennyson, Mill, Arnold.

Section 01, W at 5:30, Cynthia Huff

This course will focus on the Victorians’ penchant for using life writing forms to explore pertinent nineteenth- century issues and concerns, such as individual and women’s rights, self-help, empire, increasing literacy, and proliferation of media to look at how much the Victorian age is like our own. We’ll consider various genres of life writing such as letters, diaries, essays, biography, the autobiographical novel, the travelogue, and the family book to help us understand how and why the Victorians were so self -conscious about representing themselves and their age and why it made so much sense for them to choose life writing as the form with which to do this. The course will also emphasize pedagogy to show how reading and studying life writing as a genre helps students at various levels best understand Victorian culture and literature; hence, it will satisfy the pedagogy requirement.

Assigned texts will explore gender, class, and race as these inflect major Victorian queries to include the Woman Question, orientalism, religion, economics, science, democracy and the liberal subject, the nation, revolution, and self- sufficiency, among others. Concentrating on and contextualizing these issues and social currents will enable us both to read as much as possible as contemporary Victorians and to use our more modern and broadly historical lenses to consider the contributions as well as the blind spots of these important writers. We will also interrogate our situated reading practices by asking how and why these might or might not be helpful for students reading older literatures and cultures and how situated reading practices may function within an English Studies pedagogical model that presupposes interrelationships among different but conjoined sub-disciplines.


ENG 447.01 Creative Writing Seminar: Poetry

Practice in the writing of poetry for graduate level or professional writers.

Section 01, M at 5:30, Duriel Harris



ENG 456 Studies in World Literature

Figures, movements, or genres in World Literature.

Section 01, T at 5:30, Rebecca Saunders

From Aeschylus to Agamben, philosophy and literature have called on the figure of the animal to delineate justice, most commonly to secure the reasoned morality of the human in opposition to the unthematized instincts of animals. While certain species, like Plato’s faithful guard dogs, have been models of the just, the indistinct term “animal” (Derrida’s aptly designated animot) has remained a standard trope for immoral and depraved behavior, the darkly incomprehensible stuff of criminality, mass atrocity, and sociopathology, disturbingly beyond the reach of moral reason: the animal as synonymous with the inhuman. Drawing on both the burgeoning interdisciplinary field of animal studies and criminology, this course will interrogate these associations and explore the literary, philosophical and filmic animals that have been key to formulating conceptions of justice.


ENG 457 Creative Writing Pedagogy

Theory and practice of the teaching of creative writing at the post-secondary level.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Kass Fleisher

This course will be, among other things, a demonstration of feminist ("decentered," social-justice-based) pedagogy. Should the group concur, it will begin with the development, by the group, of working questions; proceed through discussions of readings relevant to those questions; address practical applications of issues arising from those discussions; and conclude with the generation of papers that would be presentable to an AWP or MLA audience.


ENG 471 Critical Theories in Children's Literature

An introduction to the issues of critical theory in children's and adolescent literature.

Section 01, T at 2:00, Roberta Trites

ENG 471: The Posthuman Child (and How We Got Here)
Critical Theories in Children’s Literature

Students in this class will explore the interplay between the “linguistic turn” (i.e., poststructuralism) and the “material turn” (e.g., ecofeminism and material feminism) as these theoretical approaches have influenced the study of children’s and adolescent literature. The development of constructs of the “posthuman” will receive particular attention, since intersectionality, the cyborg, the dystopic, technology, and environmental crisis are all current and frequently discussed topics in the “material turn” of this field.

A typical class discussion will include 3-4 articles or book chapters (balancing children’s literature theorists and non-children’s literature theorists, such as Rosi Braidotti, Chris Breu, Seymour Chatman, Michel Foucault, Elizabeth Grosz, Michael Hamés-Garcia, Donna Haraway, Katherine Hayles, Julia Kristeva, etc.) Each student will respond online to the weekly readings (in 300-500 word responses). Individual students will also each lead at least one class in which they will present on the entirety of a book from which the class will have read only one chapter.

Books under consideration include the following (all of which are available through Milner as ebooks!):
Michelle Abate, The Big Smallness: Niche Marketing, the American Culture Wars, and the New Children’s Literature
Clémentine Beauvais, The Mighty Child
Alice Curry, Environmental Crisis in YA Fiction
Sara K. Day, Reading Like a Girl
Zoe Jaques, Children’s Literature and the Posthuman
Kenneth Kidd, Freud in Oz
Lydia Kokkola, Fictions of Adolescent Carnality
Kerry Mallan, Gender Dilemmas in Children’s Fiction
Tison Pugh, Innocence, Heterosexuality and the Queerness of Children’s Literature

Additional readings from children’s literature theorists will include work by Clare Bradford, Karen Coats, Alice Curry, Robyn McCallum, Mary Moran, Maria Nikolajeva, John Stephens, Eric Tribunella, and others yet to be determined. All readings (including the books themselves) will be available either online, through Reggienet/Course Reserves, or through Milner’s e-book collection.

All students will also be expected to write a 20-page seminar paper on the theoretical topic of their choice. Ideally, this paper will be constructed in such a way as to help students progress in the planning and drafting stage(s) of their master’s thesis or Ph.D. dissertation.
 



ENG 483 Studies in Cultural Rhetorics

Advanced theoretical study of intersections among rhetorics, cultures, and systems of power.

Section 01, R at 5:30, Angela Haas



ENG 494 Writing Assessment in Colleges and Universities

History, theory, and practice of post-secondary writing assessment. Grading students' writing, large-scale writing assessment, and writing assessment acriss the curriculum.

Section 01, T at 5:30, Bob Broad

Course Number:  ENG 494, Section 1
Course Title:  Writing Assessment in Colleges and Universities 
Professor:  Bob Broad
Credit Hours:  3
Meeting Time:  Tuesdays 5:30 to 8:20 p.m.
Meeting Place:  STV 410
Reference No.: 

Required Textbooks
[Please Note: This list of required texts is tentative, exploratory, and subject to revision until January 13, 2017.]

Broad, Bob.  What We Really Value: Beyond Rubrics in Teaching and Assessing Writing.  Logan, UT: Utah State UP, 2003.  Print.  (ISBN: 978-0-87421-553-3)  Approx. cost: $27 paperback, $17.50 e-book.  Available online for free through DigitalCommons@USU.

Elliot, Norbert, and Les Perelman, eds.  Writing Assessment in the 21st Century: Essays in Honor of Edward M. White.  Hampton: New York, 2012.  Print.  (ISBN: 978-1-61289-087-6)  Approx. cost: $42.50 paperback. 

Inoue, Asao B. Antiracist Writing Assessment Ecologies: Teaching and Assessing Writing for a Socially Just Future. Parlor: W. Lafayette IN, 2015. (ISBN: 978-1-60235-773-0) Approx. cost: $40.00 paperback, $20.00 PDF.

McKee, Heidi A., and Dànielle Nicole DeVoss, eds. Digital Writing Assessment & Evaluation. Logan, UT: Computers and Composition Digital Press/Utah State University Press, 2013. Web.  (ISBN: 978-0-87421-949-4)  Please note: the publishers have made this e-book available for free at:  http://ccdigitalpress.org/dwae To the best of my knowledge, it is available only as an e-book.

Huot, Brian, and Peggy O’Neill, eds.  Assessing Writing: A Critical Sourcebook.  NCTE/Bedford St. Martin’s: Boston, 2009.  Print.  (ISBN: 978-0-312-47596-3)  Approx. cost: $44.  HOWEVER:  Do not purchase this book; I have copies for you, compliments of the publisher, Bedford/St. Martin’s. 

(We will also read various position statements, book chapters, and journal articles TBA.) 

Description of Course
This course helps participants build and apply their knowledge of the history, theory, and practice of writing assessment in colleges and universities.  Topics and themes for the course range from classroom concerns like assigning, responding to, and grading students’ writing to such programmatic issues as large-scale writing assessment (including placement and proficiency assessment) and evaluation of writing across the curriculum. 

Writing assessment tends to gather a lot of scholarly and political attention because it is the foremost arena in which the usually marginalized discourses of English Studies, which (following Robert Scholes) I would dub “textuality,” encounter the powerful discourses of science and politics.  For over a hundred years, humanists, scientists, and politicians (among others) have struggled for control over how student-authored texts will be valued.  The struggle continues and, perhaps surprisingly, the humanists are holding their own.  Stay tuned. 

We will delve into some or all of the following topics:

  • Histories of writing assessment
  • Theories of educational evaluation, including evolving conceptions of “reliability” and “validity”
  • Authentic and educative assessment vs. testing
  • Race/ethnicity, socioeconomic class, and writing assessment
  • Students’ reflections, self-evaluations, and peer evaluations
  • Portfolio assessment
  • Large-scale assessment
  • Writing program assessment
  • Computerized writing assessment
  • Assessment of texts written by second-language learners
  • Writing assessment across the university curriculum

Format of Course
Participants in this class may collectively or individually author reviews of books on the topic of writing assessment for the Journal of Writing Assessment's “Reading List.”  We will also likely submit one or more proposals for panel discussions and/or workshops to be presented at the CCCC 2018 conference (March 14-17, Kansas City, MO).  Beyond these academic outreach efforts, we will read books and articles about writing assessment.  We will write informally and formally and share our readings, writings, resources, and ideas during class meetings. In addition to establishing a broad basis of professional knowledge regarding the evaluation of writing, course participants will conduct individual or collaborative research studies (empirical and/or textual) on a particular aspect of writing assessment that they deem important and valuable.  These research studies should be closely linked to participants’ plans for future teaching, internships, theses, dissertations, articles, books, and other professional responsibilities.  Finally, participants in this class will undertake a communal change project by which we attempt to apply our shared knowledge and hope in order to change the world for the better.



ENG 498 Professional Practice: Internship in English

Supervised field experience in English with local, state, national, and international businesses, agencies, institutions (including colleges and universities), and organizations.

Section 01, arrange, Jim Kalmbach



ENG 499 Master's Thesis

Consult with department.



ENG 500 Independent Study

Directed independent study in an area of English Studies.

Arrange with instructor.



ENG 510 Seminar in English Studies Pedagogy

Research and study of pedagogical theory in post-secondary English Studies with emphasis on developing self-reflexive pedagogy.

Section 01, W at 5:30, Ricardo Cruz



ENG 540 Seminar in Linguistics and Language Study

Research in descriptive, historical, applied, or theoretical linguistics, within the context of English Studies.

Section 01, R at 5:30, Mahide Demirci



ENG 591 Practicum (Internship) in College Teaching

Teaching of lower-division English courses with emphasis upon new techniques; under faculty direction, at Illinois State University or off campus; in conjuction with tutorial meetings.

Consult with department.



ENG 599 Doctoral Research

Research involving the gathering of materials and data and the writing of a dissertation.

Consult with department.



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