2016 - 2017 Undergraduate Course Offerings

For the most current schedule information, please visit the University's Course Finder.

Summer 2017

ENG 101 Composition as Critical Inquiry

Rhetorical approach to writing, taught through extensive collaborative drafting, revising, and editing. Emphasis on critical reading and analysis. Computer-assisted. Not for credit major/minor. May not be taken under the CT/NC option.

Section 01, online, 8 weeks beginning 5/22/2017, TBD



ENG 110 English Literature and Its Contexts

A historical study of the main movements in English literature. Readings of entire works representative of the movements.

Section 01, online, 4 weeks beginning 6/5/2017, Carol Lind

This will be a completely online course in which we will do our work utilizing screencast lectures, discussion groups, and various ReggieNet tools. Because we will be covering roughly fifteen-hundred years of English literature in four weeks, successful students will be expected to make this their four-week full-time job in order to rigorously complete the various course requirements: viewing lectures, reading the material, completing assessments, interacting with their fellow classmates and, most importantly, thinking about the connections and contextual influences between and upon the works we are studying.


IDS 121.19 Texts and Contexts: Literary Studies

Interdisciplinary writing-intensive course focusing on significant humanities texts in relationship to their historical and cultural contexts.

Section 01, online, 4 weeks beginning 5/22/2017, Sarah Hochstetler

Education in Popular Culture: Representations and Realities

This online course will explore the connections between education and popular culture over a period of fifty-plus years through an intense reading and writing curriculum. Goals for this class include: working to identify the tensions between those involved in teaching (e.g., students, teachers, administrators, schools) and their representations in popular texts (e.g., movies, television, literature, music); analyzing how these constructed realities compete with current and past perspectives, various ideologies, and educational/popular discourses; and exploring how these representations influence our individual and collective thinking about schooling, gender, adolescence, and authority. We will meet these goals through daily reading and writing assignments, ongoing discussion forums, group and individual virtual presentations/projects, a midterm, and final exam.

Texts under consideration, to be confirmed late Spring:

Best, A. Prom Night: Youth, Schools, and Popular Culture. ISBN: 0415924286
Bulman, R. Hollywood Goes to High School. ISBN: 978-1464171697
Dalton, M., et. al. Teacher TV: Sixty Years of Teachers on Television. ISBN: 9780820497150
Fisher, R. et. al. Education in Popular Culture: Telling Tales on Teachers and Learners. ISBN:9780415332422
Pascoe, C.J. Dude You’re a Fag: Masculinity and Sexuality in High School. ISBN: 978052025230
Alexie, S., The Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time Indian. ISBN: 9780316013680
Supplemental texts (e.g., required articles, movies, video clips, etc.) available through ReggieNet, YouTube, Milner Library, and other online sources.

Note: In a summer course, each day is equal to one week of class during a regular semester. We have fifteen days together to do the work typically accomplished in sixteen weeks. Therefore, this class is fast-paced and concentrated, requiring strong time-management skills and exceptional self-discipline. Active participation is expected and required for success.

Section 02, online, 6 weeks beginning 6/5/2017, Gabriel Gudding

Alien Worlds: The Other within the Cosmos

In this online class we will study science fiction and speculative fiction, in both video and textual form, of the last two hundred years in order to examine the ways writers have conceived of life as an alien reality within the cosmos.

The course will place special emphasis on the ways early and contemporary writers of “weird tales” and speculative fiction have conceived of the alien on Earth and the earthly city as alien.  The literary authors we’ll investigate will range from Dante, Bram Stoker, HP Lovecraft, Ambrose Bierce, Francis Stevens, Ralph Ellison, Margaret St. Clair, William Burroughs, Italo Calvino, to Octavia Butler, Patricia Cadigan, and Peter Waterhouse. Video selections will include The Thing, True Detective, and Ridley Scott’s recent Prometheus, as well as old television shows such as The Jetsons, The Flintstones, and Land of the Lost.

To provide context and helps us make connections, we’ll read philosophical and scientific texts that historically situate various conceptions of life as a common travail, a collaborative struggle, and an alien and frightening experience. These texts will range from brief essays and short treatises of theology, philosophy, natural science, and cosmology by Adorno, Kwame Anthony Appiah, Hannah Arendt, St. Augustine, Ray Brassier, Giordano Bruno, Darwin, Derrida, Emerson, Franz Fanon, William and Caroline Herschel, Edwin Hubble, Kant, Levinas, Quentin Meillessoux, and Nietzsche. We will even read selections from the Nazi writers Gottfried Benn and Martin Heidegger.

The class will examine the nature of hatred and fear of the other, racism, speciesism, nihilism, existential dread, the horror of infection and invasion, the fear of death and extinction, and the nature of the beautiful and the sublime. Students may realize that we are all, all of us, already astronauts.

Most of our reading and viewing will be done via PDF and YouTube. Texts to purchase will be limited to:

Shadows of Carcosa: Tales of Cosmic Horror (ISBN: 978-1-59017-943-7)
Invisible Cities, Italo Calvino (ISBN: 978-0-15-645380-6)
Naked Lunch, William Burroughs (ISBN: 978-0802122070)
Language Death Night Outside, Peter Waterhouse (ISBN: 978-1886224995)



ENG 124 Film Style and Literature

An introduction to the analysis of films and their literary components through an application of specialized terms and concepts.

Section 01, online, 4 weeks beginning 6/5/2017, William McBride

WARNING! The content of the films and books in this class
are designed for mature audiences only. If issues of race, sex, violence, class, drugs, profanity or politics cause you discomfort or upset, please consider enrolling in a different class.
Fun Course! You'll see movies in a different way, but it's a lot of work, particularly when squeezed into one summer month. Please be prepared to work every weekday.

Think of this course as an intensive English Department literature course in which you write essays in a "foreign" language--the language of film. The theory of Film Style & Literature argues that style can be described, analyzed, and turned into meaning via metaphor. Your goal is to acquire adequate film vocabulary and skill to convert your observations of camera placement and movement, lighting, spatial relationships, soundtrack, etc. into an analysis of the meaning of a "stylized moment"and, from that, of the film as a whole. Do not be misled by the fact that this is a 100 level General Education course--it is nonetheless challenging.

10 forum posts
2 essay exams


PHASE ONE: GENRES:
Caddyshack (Screwball)
Maltese Falcon (Noir)
PHASE TWO: HITCHCOCK
Notorious Vertigo Psycho
PHASE THREE-AMERCIAN PLAYS TO SCREEN
Death of a Salesman Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
PHASE FOUR: AMERICAN INDEPENDENTS
Taxi Driver Life Lessons Blue Velvet Into the Wild
Extra Credit
Stagecoach
Miss Julie
Dutchman
Life Lesson
s



ENG 125 Literary Narrative

Critical reading and analysis of a variety of literary narratives that reflect on human experience.

Section 01, online, 4 weeks beginning 5/22/2017, TBD



ENG 128 Gender in the Humanities

Examination of gender roles, norms, and stereotypes from a broad range of perspectives within humanities across centuries and cultures.

Section 01, online, 4 weeks beginning 5/22/2017, Kass Fleisher

Section 02, online, 4 weeks beginning 5/22/2017, TBD



ENG 143 Unity and Diversity in Language

Study of the structure of language (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics) as it reflects cognition, social relations, cultural conventions, and seech communities.

Section 01, MTWR at 1:00, 4 weeks starting 6/5/2017, Lucy Belomoina



ENG 145 Writing in the Academic Disciplines (Sections 01-03)

Introduction to research-based writing for multiple academic audiences. Computer-assisted.

Section 01, online, 8 weeks beginning 5/22/2017, Jeremy Hurley

Section 02, online, 8 weeks beginning 5/22/2017, TBD

Section 03, online, 8 weeks beginning 6/5/2017, TBD



ENG 206 Cultural Expressional in Social Contexts: Women of Asia, Latin America and Africa

Interdisciplinary study of carieties of women's cultural expressions within distinct soical contexts including camparative emphasis on fidderent regions of concern.

Section 01, online, 4 weeks, beginning 5/22/2017, TBD



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ENG 243 The Grammatical Structure of English

Linguistic description of present day American English, focusing on morphology and syntax.

Section 01, MTWRF at 9:30, 3 weeks starting 5/15/2017, Mahide Demirci

This course, in depth, teaches the major principles, concepts and components of English Grammar. We will study “Grammatical Categories” (nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, etc.), the internal structure of words (morphology) and the internal structure of sentences (syntax). We will begin by looking at the idea of "correct" English grammar (prescriptivism) and go on to examine (descriptively) the structure of English language, Through this class, you will learn important facts of English grammar as well as a linguistic/scientific way of thinking about grammar. You will learn various basic concepts and terminology regarding to the structure of English grammar and how to use and apply linguistic/grammatical methods to investigate/analyze the principles of language. This course will enable you to evaluate the use of language much more consciously both in text and also in everyday life You will realize that the kinds of things you study in English Grammar are all around us all the time, and there is grammar in everything in everyday life. English Grammar is not about learning what we are allowed to say and what we are not allowed to say. Instead, it is about a way of looking at the English around us and at language in general. Furthermore, an understanding of the major principles of English Grammar will help you sequence language material for teaching in your own classroom and also follow the language development of your students closely. Finally, you will understand and appreciate the nature of linguistic differences; as a result, you will become aware of the problems of the second language learners and aware of the responsibilities of the language teachers in the multicultural classrooms.


ENG 249 Technical and Professional Writing I

Introduction to technical and professional writing. Includes study of manuals, reports, proposals, audience analysis, formatting, and style.

Section 01, online, 6 weeks beginning 6/5/2017, Angela Haas

Section 02, online, 6 weeks beginning 5/22/2017, Lee Brasseur



ENG 285 London on Stage: Shakespeare & Company

English course for study abroad in London, UK.

Section 01, 6 weeks beginning 5/22/2017, Tara Lyons



ENG 290 Language Arts

Study of language acquisition and research in critical thinking, listening, speaking, writing, vocabulary development, usage, and spelling for children.

Section 01, online, 6 weeks beginning 5/22/2017, Eileen Bularzik



ENG 341 Introduction to Descriptive Linguistics

Aims and methods of linguistic science. Nature and functions of language: phonology, morphology, syntax, variation.

Section 01, MTWR at 11:00, 4 weeks beginning 6/5/2017, K. Aaron Smith



ENG 375 Young Adult Literature

Advances critical examination of literature for young adults with emphasis on trends and research.

Section 01, MTWR at 11:00, 4 weeks beginning 5/22/2017, Jan Susina

This course will emphasize reading of young adult literature with attention to the analysis of literary representation of the stages of adolescence and adolescent concerns. The course traces the development of the genre of adolescent literature and will investigate thematic and stylistic changes found in such texts. In addition to reading a variety of literary genres – fiction, poetry, drama, graphic novel – written specifically for adolescents, books read by adolescents, and books that are assigned to adolescents in the classroom. Students will develop a detailed proposal for research paper with an annotated bibliography on an adolescent text or some aspect of adolescent culture. All students will write a film analysis, create a cannon of young adult literature, and complete a mixed tape/CD project. A final exam will be give at the end of the course and regular reading quizzes on the reading will be given throughout the course. Given the concentrated nature of this four-week summer school course, attendance at every class session is required as is active participation in class discussion.


ENG 398 Professional Practice: Internship in English

Supervised field experience in English with local, state, national, and international businesses, agencies, institutions (including colleges and universities), and organizations.

Section 01, arrange, Elise Hurley



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Fall 2017

ENG 100 Introduction to English Studies

Critical reading and writing in English Studies.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, TBA

Section 02, TR at 11:00, Susan Kim

Section 03, MW at 3:35, Paul Ugor

Section 04, MW at 11:00, Joe Amato

Section 05, TR at 12:35, Brian Rejack

Section 06, MW at 2:00, Chris De Santis



ENG 101 Composition as Critical Inquiry (Sections 01-65)

Rhetorical approach to writing, taught through extensive collaborative drafting, revising, and editing. Emphasis on critical reading and analysis. Computer-assisted. Not for credit major/minor. May not be taken under the CT/NC option.



ENG 101.10 Composition as Critical Inquiry (Sections 01-36)

Rhetorical approach to writing, taught through extensive collaborative drafting, revising, and editing. Emphasis on critical reading and analysis. Computer-assisted. Not for credit major/minor. May not be taken under the CT/NC option.



ENG 102 Introduction to English Studies Proseminar

A structured proseminar designed to introduce students to the complex intellectual and professional aspects of the degree in English Studies.

Section 01, MW at 1:00, Mark Vegter

Section 02, TR at 12:00, Mark Vegter

Section 03, M at 4:00, Mark Vegter

Section 04, T at 1:00, Mark Vegter



ENG 110 English Literature and Its Contexts

A historical study of the main movements in English literature. Readings of entire works representative of the movements.

Section 01, TR at 11:00, Tara Lyons

Section 02, TR at 3:35, Tara Lyons



IDS 121.19 Texts and Contexts: Literary Studies

Interdisciplinary writing-intensive course focusing on significant humanities texts in relationship to their historical and cultural contexts.

Section 01, TR at 9:35, TBA

Section 02, MW at 11:00, Paul Ugor

Section 03, TR at 2:00, TBA

Section 04, MW at 2:00, TBA



ENG 124 Film Style and Literature

An introduction to the analysis of films and their literary components through an application of specialized terms and concepts.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Blended, William McBride



ENG 125 Literary Narrative

Critical reading and analysis of a variety of literary narratives that reflect on human experience.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, TBA

Section 02, TR at 11:00, TBA

Section 03, TR at 9:35, TBA

Section 04, MW at 12:35, TBA

Section 05, TR at 12:35, TBA

Section 06, MW at 2:00, TBA

Section 07, TR at 5:00, TBA



ENG 128 Gender in the Humanities

Examination of gender roles, norms, and stereotypes from a broad range of perspectives within humanities across centuries and cultures.

Section 01, TR at 9:35, TBA

Section 02, MW at 11:00, TBA

Section 03, MW at 12:35, TBA

Section 04, TR at 2:00, TBA

Section 05, TR at 11:00, TBA



ENG 130 Survey of American Literature

A historical study of the main movements in American literature. Readings of entire works representative of the movements.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Jeremy Hurley

This course will provide an overview of American literature from its beginnings to the present. Through an examination of selected literary texts from both canonical and non-canonical authors, this course will engage with a diverse body of works that are intended to expand student knowledge of important movements in American literature. Along with gaining a greater familiarity with important American literary works, students will also analyze how these works reflect or challenge contemporary social and cultural beliefs.

Required Texts:
Readings for the course will come primarily from the Norton Anthology of American Literature (shorter 8th edition). We will also read Hannah Webster Foster's The Coquette and James Baldwin’s Go Tell It on the Mountain. Any other required readings will be made available via Reggienet.

Section 02, MW at 3:35, Jeremy Hurley

This course will provide an overview of American literature from its beginnings to the present. Through an examination of selected literary texts from both canonical and non-canonical authors, this course will engage with a diverse body of works that are intended to expand student knowledge of important movements in American literature. Along with gaining a greater familiarity with important American literary works, students will also analyze how these works reflect or challenge contemporary social and cultural beliefs.

Required Texts:
Readings for the course will come primarily from the Norton Anthology of American Literature (shorter 8th edition). We will also read Hannah Webster Foster's The Coquette and James Baldwin’s Go Tell It on the Mountain. Any other required readings will be made available via Reggienet.

Section 03, TR at 2:00, Chris Breu



ENG 143 Unity and Diversity in Language

Study of the structure of language (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics) as it reflects cognition, social relations, cultural conventions, and speech communities.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, TBA

Section 02, MW at 11:00, TBA



ENG 145 Writing in the Academic Disciplines (Sections 01-12)

Introduction to research-based writing for multiple academic audiences. Computer-assisted.



ENG 145.13 Writing in the Academic Disciplines (Sections 01-10)

Introduction to research-based writing for multiple academic audiences. Computer-assisted.



ENG 160 Introduction to Studies in Women's Writing

Readings in a variety of genres and historical periods.

Section 01, MW at 12:35, TBA



ENG 165 Introduction to African-American Literature and Culture

Selected topics in African-American literature and culture.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, TBA



ENG 170 Foundations in Literature for Children

Introduction to genres of children’s literature, including mythologies, fairy tales, picture books, poetry, and historical, multicultural, and current prose.

As the first course in the children's literature sequence at Illinois State University, ENG 170, Foundations in Literature for Children, is designed to serve as a general introduction to literature for those students studying children's literature. The course covers K-8th grade literature. The primary goal of the course is for students to learn to read literature using children's literature as texts.

The course focuses on children's texts for pre-readers and young readers, including picture books, chapters books, series books, novels, poetry and nursery rhymes, folklore, mythologies, information books and children's films at the K-8th grade level. Texts covered in the class include both canonical and noncanonical texts, recognized and recent children's texts, with attention to classics and multicultural texts, both historical and contemporary. Students in the class learn a range of conceptual materials as they are exposed to this wide variety of children's texts, including how to analyze genre, narrative and poetic form, ideology and issues of social construction, and introductory literary concepts.

Individual instructors order different texts for the section they are assigned to teach. Students enrolling in English 170 will generally be asked to purchase and read approximately 10-15 children's books for the course. While assessments may vary from section to section of English 170, they will include written papers, oral participation, quizzes, and examinations.

Section 01, MWF at 8:00, TBA

Section 02, TR at 8:00, TBA

Section 03, TR at 9:35, TBA

Section 04, MWF at 1:00, TBA

Section 05, MWF at 2:00, TBA

Section 06, MW at 5:00, TBA

Section 07, TR at 5:00, TBA



ENG 194 Introduction to English Education

This course is designed to introduce students to foundational concepts and issues associated with the teaching of high school English in diverse settings.

Section 01, TR at 11:00, Sarah Hochstetler

Section 02, TR at 2:00, Eileen Bularzik



ENG 213 Medieval Studies

Literature written in English from the 8th century to the 15th.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Susan Kim



ENG 222 Studies in Shakespeare

Selected readings with emphasis on the relationship between the author, the text, and the larger culture.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, Tara Lyons



ENG 227 Introduction to Creative Writing

Opportunity for creative writing of various kinds, such as poetry, fiction, and nonfiction.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, TBA

Section 02, TR at 11:00, TBA

Section 03, MW at 3:35, TBA

Section 04, TR at 2:00, TBA

Section 05, TR at 12:35, TBA



ENG 229 Introduction to Literary Genres

Formal and historical study of literary genres - poetry, drama, prose narrative - as structures of knowledge.

Section 01, MW at 3:35, Joe Amato

We'll be reading five books in four genres, watching excerpts from a few films, evaluating a pop song, reading an essay or two, and conducting table readings of a screenplay, all the while trying to understand how genre shapes meaning and reception. Especially pertinent to this course will be a consideration of what it means to be a socially responsible thinker, writer, citizen. Course materials will plumb the divide between the desire for peace and happiness and the demands of justice.

Section 02, MW at 2:00, William McBride

We will chronologically walk, run, fly, shower, meet in the woods, swim and read through American poetry (Whitman, Ginsberg) drama (Miller, Albee, Baraka), fiction (Melville, Bloch, Styron), non-fiction (Turner/Gray, Asbury, Krakauer) and film (Huston, Hitchcock, Nichols, Harvey, Scorsese, Schlondorff, Penn, Parker) as we experience murder, fantasy, slavery, fishing, adultery, the docks, suicide, grass, whipped cheese, race relations, monotheism, coming of age, schizophrenia, maniacal obsession, class warfare, capitalism and handguns in this genre course where both formal and thematic readings will be practiced. All texts are American and most available online. Weekly 350 word posts. Final essay.

Genres:

Poetry

Whitman. Leaves of Grass. (1855)
Ginsberg. Howl (1955)

Drama
Miller. Death of a Salesman (1949) (film)
Albee. Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1962) (film)
Baraka. Dutchman (1964) (film)

Film
Huston Moby Dick (1956)
Hitchcock. Psycho (1960)
Nichols. Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966)
Harvey. Dutchman (1967)
Scorsese. Taxi Driver (1976)
Schlondorff. Death of a Salesman (1985)
Scorsese. The Gangs of New York (2002)
Penn. Into The Wild (2007)
Parker. The Birth of a Nation (2016)

Fiction
Melville. Moby Dick; or, The Whale (1851)
Bloch. Psycho (1959) (film)
Styron. The Confessions of Nat Turner (1967)

Non-Fiction
Turner/Gray. The Confessions of Nat Turner (1831)
Asbury. The Gangs of New York: An Informal History of the Underworld (1927)
Krakauer. Into The Wild (1995) (film)

Chronology:
Turner/Gray. The Confessions of Nat Turner (1831) Parker film (2016) film
Styron. The Confessions of Nat Turner (1967)
Melville. Moby Dick; or, The Whale (1851) Huston film (1956)
Whitman. Leaves of Grass (1855)
Asbury. The Gangs of New York: An Informal History of the Underworld (1927)
Scorsese film (2002)
Miller. Death of a Salesman (1949) Schlondorff film (1985)
Ginsberg. Howl (1955)
Hitchcock. Psycho (1960) Bloch fiction (1959)
Albee. Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1962) Nichols film (1966) Penguin
Baraka. Dutchman (1964) Harvey film (1967)
Scorsese. Taxi Driver (1976)
Krakauer. Into The Wild (1995) Penn film (2007)



ENG 232 American Literature: 1830-1870

Main figures and movements of mid-19th century American literature.

Section 01, MW at 12:35, Jeremy Hurley

This course will investigate a variety of important texts that impacted the social and cultural world of America in the mid-nineteenth century. This period, generally known as the American Renaissance, will cover those authors central to the canon (such as Emerson, Hawthorne, and Poe) as well as some who have been historically less recognized. The types of texts we will cover is diverse not only through our selection of authors but also through the range of genres we will read—gothic tales, sentimental novels, slave narratives, autobiographical novels, political and philosophical essays, among others—to better understand how American writers saw their world amidst the changes of the 19th century. Along with looking at various primary texts, we will also strive to examine the world in which they were created so that we may better understand the relationships between author and place.

During the semester, we will read selections from Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman, Edgar Allan Poe, and Emily Dickinson, as well as the following complete works: Henry David Thoreau’s Walden, Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The House of the Seven Gables, a novella by Herman Melville, Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Fanny Fern’s Ruth Hall, and Harriet Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl.



ENG 239 Multimodal Composition

Workshop emphasizing rhetorical analysis and composition of digital texts in a variety of modes including graphics, typography, audio, video, animation.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, Erika Sparby



ENG 241 Growth and Structure of the English Language

An introduction to the history of English designed to help students understand language change and the emergence of contemporary English.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, Susan Kim



ENG 243 The Grammatical Structure of English

Linguistic description of present day American English, focusing on morphology and syntax.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Mahide Demirci

Section 02, TR at 2:00, Mahide Demirci

Section 03, TR at 3:35, Mahide Demirci



ENG 244 Applied Grammar and Usage for Writers

Traditional, structural, and transformational grammars applied to needs of writers. Choosing among alternative grammatical strategies. Usage; semanitics of punctuation. Revising.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, TBA



ENG 246 Advanced Composition

Extensive writing of essays developed in greater depth and sophistication in subject matter than those written in previous writing courses. Computer-assisted.

Section 01, TR at 9:35, TBA

Section 02, TR at 11:00, TBA



ENG 247.01 Intermediate Creative Writing: Poetry

Workshop in the genre, with critical examination of its conventions.

Section 01, MW at 3:35, Duriel Harris



ENG 247.02 Intermediate Creative Writing: Fiction

Workshop in the genre, with critical examination of its conventions.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Joe Amato

Required reading will consist of a collection of eighty-six flash fiction pieces from around the world. For our purposes, flash fiction will be fiction of generally no more than 1000 words in length. We’ll hold eight discussion sessions accordingly, and eight workshop sessions. Everyone will submit two portfolios and participate in peer review of same, and I’ll sit down with each student twice during the semester to offer my evaluation of the portfolios.


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ENG 247.03 Intermediate Creative Writing: Non-Fiction

Workshop in the genre, with critical examination of its conventions.

Section 01, MW at 3:35, Kass Fleisher



ENG 249 Technical and Professional Writing I

Introduction to technical and professional writing. Includes study of manuals, reports, proposals, audience analysis, formatting, and style.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, TBA

Section 02, TR at 9:35, Lee Brasseur

Section 03, TR at 11:00, Erika Sparby

Section 04, TR at 2:00, Lee Brasseur

Section 05, MW at 12:35, TBA

Section 06, MW at 11:00, TBA



ENG 250 Literature of the Bible I

Major ideas and literary forms of the Hebrew Bible/Christian Old Testament.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Jan Neuleib



ENG 254 Introduction to Professional Publishing

Study and practice of editorial, production, printing, and marketing processes involved with producing a book or journal.

Section 01, T at 5:30, Steve Halle



ENG 260 History of Literature by Women

A historical overview of writing by women.

Section 01, MW at 5:00, Kass Fleisher



ENG 271 Literature for Young Children

Analysis of works written for children ages 5 to 9, including multicultural picture books, fairy tales, poetry, and chapter books.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Karen Coats

Section 02, MW at 3:35, Mary Jeanette Moran



ENG 272 Literature for Middle Grades

Analysis of works written for children ages 9 to 13, including multicultural novels and information books, children's media, and culture.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, Mary Jeanette Moran

Section 02, MW at 11:00, Mary Jeanette Moran

Section 03, TR at 2:00, Jan Susina



ENG 283 Rhetorical Theory and Applications

Critical and analytical examination of the nature and historical development of rhetorical theory and its applications to contemporary discourse.

Section 01, TR at 11:00, Amy Robillard

Section 02, TR at 2:00, Amy Robillard



ENG 285 Drama

Critical and analytical examination of the nature and historical development of drama as a genre.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Paul Ugor



ENG 286 Prose

Critical and analytical examination of the nature and hostorical development of prose literature - fiction and non-fiction.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, Chris Breu



ENG 287 Independent Study

Section 01, ARR



ENG 296 The Teaching of Literature

Examines current scholarship in the teaching of literature at the secondary level; integrates theories of teaching literature with teaching practice. Includes Clinical Experiences: 10 hours, Type 1-5 and 9.

Section 01, TR at 11:00, TBA



ENG 297 The Teaching of Writing

Examines current scholarship in the teaching of writing at the secondary level; integrates theories of teaching writing with teaching practice. Includes Clinical Experiences: 15 hours, Type 1-5 and 9.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Sarah Hochstetler

Section 02, TR at 2:00, Sarah Hochstetler



ENG 299 Independent Honors Study

Section 01, Arrange



ENG 300 Senior Seminar

Capstone course for English majors, synthesizing the main dimensions of English studies. Requires senior project and portfolio.

Section 01, TR at 9:35, Amy Robillard

In this section of ENG 300, we will consider the claim that reading is a process. While we often conceptualize writing as a process because of the relatively discrete stages we believe we go through when we write, many of us conceptualize reading as something we do all at once or not at all. But together we will think through the ways that reading arrives for us—and by this I mean that we will think about where the reading we do comes from, how we share it with others, and how social networks form as a result of this sharing. You will trace some of the reading you have done as English majors, and we will trace the ways the reading for this course leads us to other texts that we surely would not have known about otherwise. How might you take this understanding of reading with you as you leave the structure of the university?

This seminar will be discussion heavy and will be dependent on student participation for its success. Please come ready to engage in careful reading and thoughtful discussion. Students will be responsible for choosing additional readings as the seminar progresses.

Required texts
Eula Biss, On Immunity
Elizabeth H. Boquet, Nowhere Near the Line
Elizabeth V. Spelman, Repair: The Impulse to Restore in a Fragile World

Section 02, TR at 2:00, Susan Kalter

Section 03, MW at 2:00, Kass Fleisher



ENG 308 Literature and the Related Arts

Formal, aesthetic, and cultural relationships among literature, art, music, drama, film, and other related arts.

Section 01, TR at 9:35, Robert McLaughlin

The American Musical Theater—Then—Now—and a lot of Sondheim

This course will survey the history of the American musical theater from its origins, through its musical-comedy heyday, to its maturity in the Rodgers and Hammerstein era.  It will then focus on the musical theater of the last 45 years, with special attention to the work of Stephen Sondheim and his collaborators.  We will read scripts, listen to music, study some history, and engage some aesthetics.

The goal will be to gain an understanding of the ways musical plays work as aesthetic pieces and of how they function more broadly historically and culturally.

Class meetings will be discussion-based.  Each student will be responsible for a research presentation.  There will be three three-to-five-page essays and one research-based essay.

Texts I anticipate using include:

Larry Stempel, Showtime: A History of the Broadway Musical Theater
Library of America, American Musicals: The Complete Books and Lyrics
Stephen Sondheim and George Furth, Company
Stephen Sondheim and James Goldman, Follies
Stephen Sondheim and Hugh Wheeler, Sweeney Todd, the Demon Barber of Fleet Street
Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine, Sunday in the Park with George
Brian Yorkey and Tom Kitt, Next to Normal
Jason Robert Brown, The Last Five Years
William Finn and James Lapine, Falsettos
Adam Guettel and Craig Lucas, The Light in the Piazza



ENG 322 Studies in the English Novel

Study of the movements, figures, historical periods, contexts, and theories of English novels.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Katherine Ellison

Life Writing and the History of the Novel

Frances Burney is most famous for her novels, like Evelina and Cecilia, which made Jane Austen’s career possible. Yet more meaningful to her were the diaries she kept for 47 years, the piles of letters she had filed away between her, her sister, her friends, her husband, and fellow literary celebrities. In those files were her narratives of, for example, her mastectomy, which she endured awake, without any anesthesia. She lived with this massive archive of personal life writings in Paris in the spring of 1815 when the city was invaded by Napoleon. She had to abandon all of her writings, taking with her only a basket of clean clothes. She was devastated.

The literary term, “autobiography,” coined in 1797, has shifted to the term “life writing,” which allows writings of the past excluded from autobiographical classification – and from all generic categories – to finally be appreciated within new frameworks that recognize their unique contributions to human history. In particular, women’s writings have occupied an ambiguous status. Aphra Behn, Eliza Haywood, Mary Delariviere Manly, Jane Barker, and others were shut out from the high-class world of the “novelist” and demoted as “romance writers” or “writers of amatory fiction” even though their works, often highly self-referential and autobiographical, openly critiqued the conventions of the romance, claimed to be true, and were the bestsellers of their time, out-pacing the men’s writings by a large profit margin. Life writing allows us to consider their well-known works – and works buried in the archives -- from a new perspective. The concept of the autobiographical was complicated by the frequent claim of absolute authenticity and “true history” by fictional works, a move so common that the appeal to truth became the foundational convention of the early novel. Even writers like Burney, who was accepted as a novelist, wrote narratives that remained “inedited” because they didn’t fit anywhere (yet when read, were wildly popular). Her novels were not possible without these writings about her life, and the line between them is a fuzzy one.

This course will explore the relationship between the early novel and life writing and the generic conventions that made life writing so attractive and lucrative – yet so confusing – to eighteenth-century audiences. It could be argued that the eighteenth century was obsessed with writing the life. No longer interested in the general tales of the aristocratic exploits of characters who may or may not have existed, epic battles between allegorical figures who represent the “everyman,” and the construction of national icons from exaggerated models, eighteenth-century readers wanted to learn about specific, everyday people: what were their lives like, what were their struggles, their emotions, their dreams and nightmares. How did they survive the harsh living conditions of the century? They wanted details – what does a pickpocket think about, where does she come from, and where does she go? How does one become a prostitute? A wealthy merchant? What does a mastectomy feel like? Can one endure it?

This course is designed to complement, not substitute for, courses on life writing in our curriculum taught by, for example, Dr. Amy Robillard and Dr. Cynthia Huff. This course goes back a bit further in time, filling a gap in your history yet allowing you to bring what you already know to our classroom, enlightening our study of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries as you build your knowledge of the fields of life writing and novel studies and, perhaps, write your own as you learn.

Texts are still to be determined but might include:

Excerpts from the Countess of Montgomery’s Urania
Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko
Jane Barker’s Magdalen Manuscript
Mary Manley, The Adventures of Rivella; or, the History Of the Author of the Atalantis
Daniel Defoe, Journal of the Plague Year
Personal essays in The Spectator and The Female Tatler
Excerpts from theautobiography of child prodigy Colley Cibber
Excerpts from Samuel Richardson, Pamela; or, Virtue Rewarded and Eliza Haywood’s Anti-Pamela
Henry Fielding, “On Writing Lives in General”
Samuel Johnson, The Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets
James Boswell, Life of Johnson
Journals and Letters of Frances Burney
Mary Hays’ Memoirs of Emma Courtney  
Excerpts from The Diary of Elizabeth Drinker, a Quaker woman living in Philadelphia during the Revolutionary War
Excerpts from the diaries of Dorothy Wordsworth



ENG 341 Introduction To Descriptive Linguistics

Aims and methods of linguistic science. Nature and functions of language: phonology, morphology, syntax, variation.

Section 02, MW at 11:00, Susan Burt



ENG 342 Sociolinguistics

Social significance of language variation: regional, social, ethnic dialects; attitudes towards variation. Multilingual societies, language choice, language shift, language planning.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, Susan Burt



ENG 345 TESOL: Methods and Materials

Methodologies and techniques for teaching English as a Second Language; evaluation of materials for various levels and instructional goals. Includes Clincical Experiences.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Lisya Seloni



ENG 346 Assessment and Testing in ESL

Assessing oral and written proficiency in English as a Second Language.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, Hyun-Sook Kang



ENG 347.01 Advanced Creative Writing - Poetry

Workshop format for individual projects; related theory.

Section 01, M at 5:30, Duriel Harris



ENG 349 Technical Writing II

Instruction and practice in editing, proposals, and analytical writing; attention given to style manuals, research writing, and (as needed) publication. Computer assisted.

Section 01, TR at 11:00, Angela Haas

Section 02, W at 5:30, Angela Haas



ENG 350 Visible Rhetoric

Document design as a rhetorical activity and the application of theories of visible rhetoric to document production.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, Angela Haas



ENG 353 Technical Editing

Theory and practice of editing and management of documentation in industry and other organizational settings. Computer assisted.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Lee Brasseur



ENG 365 Movements and Periods in African-American Literature and Culture

Advanced critical study of major movements and periods in African-American literature.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, Ricardo Cruz



ENG 375 Young Adult Literature

Advanced critical examination of literature for young adults with emphasis on trends and research.

Section 01, TR at 9:35, Jan Susina

Section 02, TR at 11:00, Jan Susina



ENG 392 Contemporary Rhetorical Theories

Study of the principles of rhetoric to serve as basis for understanding contemporary rhetorical theories.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, Julie Jung



ENG 394 TESOL Practicum

Observation, case studies, tutoring, instructional assistance, and some teaching experience in English as a Second Language.

Section 01, W at 1:00, Hybrid, Hyun-Sook Kang



ENG 398 Professional Practice: Internship in English

Supervised field experience in English with local, state, national, and international businesses, agencies, institutions (including colleges and universities), and organizations.

Section 01, Arrange, Elise Hurley



Back to top

Spring 2017

Please note this listing is of courses from a previous semester. Check back closer to your registration date to see descriptions for upcoming courses.



ENG 100 Introduction to English Studies

Reading and writing in English, an introduction to the various sub-disciplines of English.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Paul Ugor

Section 02, TR at 2:00, Robert McLaughlin

ENG 100, Sec. 2: Introduction to English Studies
Dr. Robert McLaughlin
Tuesday Thursday 2:00-3:15

This course will introduce students to the English major.  We will study the history of English as a field, look at the range of disciplines that fall under the English studies umbrella, and enter some of the theoretical conversations that are ongoing in our field.  We will develop our skills in critical reading, research, and writing.

Class meetings will be discussion-based.  Each student will be responsible for a research presentation.  There will be three thee-to-five-page essays, an annotated bibliography, and a final exam.

Texts I anticipate using include:

Italo Calvino, If on a winter’s night a traveler
Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose
James Joyce, Dubliners
Philip Rice and Patricia Waugh, eds., Modern Literary Theory: A Reader
William Shakespeare, Richard III (Norton Critical Edition)
The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 8th ed.



ENG 101 and 101.10 Composition as Critical Inquiry

Rhetorical approach to writing, taught through extrensive collaborative drafting, revising, and editing. Emphasis on critical reading and analysis.

101, Sections 1-60, various times and instructors

101.10, Sections 1-3, various times and instructors



ENG 102 Introduction to English Studies Seminar

A structured proseminar designed to introduce students to the complex intellectual and professional aspects of the degree in English Studies.

Section 01, MW at 1:00, Mark Vegter



ENG 110 English Literature and Its Contexts

A historical study of the main movements in English literature. Readings of entire works representative of the movements.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, Susan Kim & Brian Rejack

This survey of English literature will approach literary history with a focus on transmission and communication--by these terms we mean both cultural transmission (how texts continue to move through history) and more material forms of contact (as in the case of the plagues in the background of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and in the foreground of Defoe's Journal of the Plague Year). Our approach will stress the significance of attending to how cultural materials are produced, preserved, and spread in order to make sense of what those cultural materials mean. Class format will include two lecture-based meetings and one meeting of smaller discussion sections per week.

Discussion Section 02, F at 11:00, Jeff Rients

Discussion Section 03, F at 12:00, Taylor Williams

Discussion Section 04, F at 1:00, Jeff Rients

Discussion Section 05, F at 2:00, Taylor Williams



IDS 121 Texts and Contexts

Interdisciplinary writing-intensive course focusing on significant humanities texts in relationship to their historical and cultural contexts.

121.19 Section 01, MW at 9:35, Niall Nance-Carroll

121.19 Section 02, TR at 9:35, John MacLean

121.19 Section 03, MW at 11:00, DC Cochran

Superheroes and Social Justice: Analyzing Graphic Novels Dealing with Social Responsibility

This course will analyze the importance of graphic narratives as they attempt to address issues of social justice, race, religion, and politics. Students will also learn to evaluate comic books and graphic novels through basic literary theory to help address complex issues within these narratives.

121.19 Section 04, MW at 12:35, Evan Nave

As “Millennials,” most American young people from the ages of 18-30 have come up during a time of unprecedented hip-hop influence. Rap songs are on popular radio stations, television channels, and websites. Hip-hop fashion (everything from low-waist pants to high-top sneakers) can be seen on urban, suburban, and rural sidewalks, college campuses, and runways around the globe. Hip-hop verbal stylization (from graffiti fonts to what Samy Alim calls “Hip-Hop Nation Language”) can be heard and seen in common face-to-face conversation, digital dialogue, and in the mass media and advertisement industry. In short, hip-hop’s influence is far reaching and plays either an overt or covert role in the communication and consumption lives of many young people. But what is hip-hop (to its founders, fans, advocates, and antagonists)? Where does it come from? How did it get to the place it is now? Where is it going in the future? How does it interact with African-American culture specifically and American culture at large? And, perhaps most importantly, what does it do and what is it good for?

In this course, we will examine hip-hop’s roots, elements, and cultural interactions through an English Studies (that is, rhetoric, writing, linguistics, and literature) lens. We will see what hip-hop’s made of, who has made it this way, and what we can make of it ourselves. Hopefully, we will begin to see it as a medium of artistic communication with the potential to aid in the change of things we decide need changing in our world. Hopefully, we will be begin to see it, and ourselves as an extension, as a force for good in a world often plagued by injustice and suffering. In the end, we will attempt to decide as individuals and as a class whether hip-hop has anything positive/good/beneficial to offer us and upcoming generations. We will decide if hip-hop is more than the mindless hype it is so often perceived as in mainstream American culture.

In short, we will situate hip-hop texts (literature, film, music, etc.) in the contexts of their cultural histories, analyze these hip-hop texts and contexts, and create texts of our own.

121.19 Section 05, TR at 2:00, Ana Roncero-Bellido

121.19 Section 06, MW at 3:35, Krista Roberts

Life Writing and Its Contexts

This course will explore the not-so-rigid boundaries of many forms of life writing, such as biography, autobiography, graphic, self-help, scriptotherapy, oughtabiography, autopathography, and celebrity life writing (among others). 

This course asks the following: How do authors convey their sense of "self"? Is there such a thing as "truth" in life writing? What life stories are solicited from us daily, and where do we encounter other life stories? Who determines the value of a life? What is not life writing?

Required Texts:

Alley, Kristie. How to Lose Your Ass and Regain Your Life
Alvarez, Julia. Something to Declare.
Skloot, Rebecca. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.
Smith, Sidonie, and Julia Watson. Reading Autobiography: A Guide to Interpreting Life Narratives (2nd ed).
Spiegelman, Art. The Complete Maus.

121.19 Section 07, TR at 3:35, Ana Roncero-Bellido

121.19 Section 08, TR at 11:00, Niall Nance-Carroll



ENG 124 Film Style and Literature

An introduction to the analysis of films and their literary components through an application of specialized terms and concepts.

Section 01, M online & W at 2:00, William McBride

This is a hybrid course. It is identical to its 100% asynchronous iteration except we meet f2f Wednesdays from 2-3:15. Fun but rigorous, blended (in person Monday/online Wednesday) film course that will show you how to see movies in a different way. Think of this course as an intensive English Department literature course in which you write essays in a "foreign" language--the language of film. The theory of Film Style & Literature argues that style can be detected, described, analyzed, and turned into meaning via metaphor. Your goal is to acquire adequate film vocabulary and skill from the textbook to convert your observations of camera placement and movement, lighting, spatial relationships, soundtrack, etc. into an analysis of the meaning of a "stylized moment" and, from that, of the film as a whole. Do not be misled by the fact that this is a 100 level General Education course--it is nonetheless challenging.  Blended courses are not for everyone; all work and communication is via the written word, upon which all student success is based
11 Weekly Chapter & Film Responses (250 word minimum)
2 Essays, Psycho post-stabbing sequence (900 word minimum); Into the Wild final (1350 word minimum)
Textbook: Stylized Moments. Turning Film Style Into Meaning 2013. Smashwords. ISBN 9781301579372
PHASE ONE: GENRES:
Caddyshack (Screwball)
Maltese Falcon (Noir)
Stagecoach (Western)
PHASE TWO: HITCHCOCK
Notorious, Vertigo, Psycho
PHASE THREE-AMERCIAN PLAYS TO SCREEN
Death of a Salesman, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Miss Julie, Dutchman
PHASE FOUR: AMERICAN INDEPENDENTS
Taxi Driver, Life Lessons (Scorsese), Blue Velvet (Lynch), Into the Wild (Penn)

Big Extra Credit opportunity!
Attend a screening/discussion and come down front once it's concluded, give me your name and I will award you two points extra credit each time! (A chance to raise one's average an entire letter grade w/ full attendance).
Six Week Film School on Normal Theater's Big Screen! "Alfred Hitchcock: Master of Style" Wednesday Evenings @ the Normal Theater 2/1-3/8 7pm Admission free! (Mayor's Grant)
1-Shadow of a Doubt 1943 “Uncle Charlie” story outline by Gordon McDonell 2/1
2-Notorious 1946 John Taintor Foote. "The Song of the Dragon" serialized in The Saturday Evening Post November 1921. 2/8
3-Strangers on a Train 1951 Patricia Highsmith. Strangers on a Train 1950. 2/15
4-Vertigo 1958 Pierre Boileau & Thomas Narcejac. D'Entre Les Morts 1954. trans. The Living and the Dead, Geoffrey Sainsbury 1956. 2/22
5-Psycho 1960 Robert Bloch. Psycho 1959 3/1
6-The Birds 1963 Daphne du Maurier "The Birds," The Apple Tree 1952. 3/8

Section 02, MW at 2:00, Karen Coats

ENG 124: Film Style and Literature
Course Description:
This course is designed to introduce students to the critical languages and methodologies related to film as a storytelling medium. By the end of the course, students will have acquired the vocabulary needed to parse and analyze the formal aspects of film compositions (such as editing, mise-en-scene, film sound, lighting, etc.) and how these formal techniques work together to create emotional effects. In addition to studying form, we will also attend to the range of scholarly approaches that have emerged in academic film studies, and gain a sense of how the medium has evolved since its inception, and how it has acted reciprocally on the development of American culture.
Required Text:
Film: A Critical Introduction, (3rd Ed.), by Maria T. Pramaggiore and Tom Wallis, 978-0205770779
Other essays will be made available through ReggieNet.
In addition, we will be viewing 10-12 films over the course of the semester. Screenings of these films will be arranged in Stevenson on Monday nights; attendance at these screenings is not mandatory. What IS mandatory is that you view the film under discussion for the week before Wednesday’s class. This means that if you can’t attend the Monday night screening, you will need to arrange your own access to the film. A partial film list will be available on the ReggieNet site by December 1; the class will have some input into which films we want to study later in the semester.
Assignments and Grading:
Attendance and Participation: 20%
3 short analytical papers on formal or ideological aspects of your choice: 30%
Midterm (really ¾ term): 30%
Daybook Portfolio drawn from screening journal and class notes: 20%

Section 03, MW at 3:35, Karen Coats

ENG 124: Film Style and Literature
Course Description:
This course is designed to introduce students to the critical languages and methodologies related to film as a storytelling medium. By the end of the course, students will have acquired the vocabulary needed to parse and analyze the formal aspects of film compositions (such as editing, mise-en-scene, film sound, lighting, etc.) and how these formal techniques work together to create emotional effects. In addition to studying form, we will also attend to the range of scholarly approaches that have emerged in academic film studies, and gain a sense of how the medium has evolved since its inception, and how it has acted reciprocally on the development of American culture.
Required Text:
Film: A Critical Introduction, (3rd Ed.), by Maria T. Pramaggiore and Tom Wallis, 978-0205770779
Other essays will be made available through ReggieNet.
In addition, we will be viewing 10-12 films over the course of the semester. Screenings of these films will be arranged in Stevenson on Monday nights; attendance at these screenings is not mandatory. What IS mandatory is that you view the film under discussion for the week before Wednesday’s class. This means that if you can’t attend the Monday night screening, you will need to arrange your own access to the film. A partial film list will be available on the ReggieNet site by December 1; the class will have some input into which films we want to study later in the semester.
Assignments and Grading:
Attendance and Participation: 20%
3 short analytical papers on formal or ideological aspects of your choice: 30%
Midterm (really ¾ term): 30%
Daybook Portfolio drawn from screening journal and class notes: 20%



ENG 125 Literary Narrative

Critical reading and analysis of a variety of literary narratives that reflect on human experience.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, Michelle Wright-Dottore

Section 02, MW at 11:00, Erika Romero

The general course description for ENG125 is, “Critical reading and analysis of a variety of literary narratives that reflect on human experience.” In this writing-intensive section of ENG125, we will focus on literary narratives written for, marketed to, and adapted from, children’s and young adult (YA) literature. In addition to reading and analyzing the first book in both the Harry Potter and Vampire Diaries series, we will also watch their movie and television adaptations, respectively, and read/view fan texts (fanart, fanvids, fan fiction, etc.) based on this source material. Alongside class discussion in which we analyze the social, cultural, generic, and media influences of these (and on these) texts, we will also critique these texts using formal and creative genres. Supplementary readings about literary narratives, adaptations, and analysis will also be assigned throughout the semester, in order to help us achieve the course goals.

Section 03, MW at 12:35, Tharini Viswanath

ENG 125: Embodiment of Gender and Sexuality in Children’s and Young Adult Literature deals with perceptions of middle and high school sexuality represented in picturebooks and young adult novels. This course also serves as introduction to some key concepts and terms in Women’s and Gender Studies; primarily, it will deal with concerns about the pre-teen/teenage body, its representations in literature, relationships and sexuality, bodily influence and the influence of the media, among other themes. Moreover, this course includes the application of terms and concepts to a variety of literary texts. By the end of this course, you will:

  • Be familiar with certain terms particular to women’s and gender studies.
  • Be familiar with women’s and gender studies texts, at least significant authors.
  • Be able to critically read and analyze texts with regard to gender and sexuality in children’s texts.
  • Be able to identify gender-based ideologies imbedded in texts, and discuss how these ideologies perpetuate and inform your construction of gender roles and non-traditional sexualities.

Section 04, TR at 12:35, Michael Wollitz

Section 05, MW at 2:00, Scott Pyrz

Section 06, TR at 2:00, Francesco Levato

Section 07, MW at 3:35, DC Cochran

Afrofuturism and Black Speculative Fiction

This course is centered on exploring the intersection of African-American literature, fantasy, science fiction and speculative fiction through the gaze of Afrofuturism (Black Sci-Fi). Students will engage with texts that use Afrofuturism as a foundation for addressing issues of race, politics, and social justice within the African-American community. By the end of this course, students will be able to answer the following questions: What is Afrofuturism? What is Black speculative fiction? How do these genres create a voice for Black people in science fiction? What are some recurring themes in Afrofuturism and Black speculative fiction? Selected readings will focus on graphic narratives, science fiction, music and literature of (in)famous African-American authors in attempt to answer the aforementioned questions.

Section 08, TR at 3:35, Francesco Levato

Section 09, TR at 9:35, Michael Wollitz



ENG 128 Gender in the Humanities

Examination of gender roles, norms, and stereotypes from a broad range of perspectives within humanities across centuries and cultures.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, David Giovagnoli

This section will focus on “Gay Men’s English.” Beginning with the linguistic work of William Leap, moving to rhetorical analyses of Robbie Rogers, David Sedaris, and the HIV/AIDS crisis, and ending with the fiction of James Baldwin, Mark Merlis, and Madeline Miller, students will explore the way in which gay men communicate and are portrayed in media through three English Studies lenses. 

Section 02, TR at 9:35, Irina Nersessova

Section 03, MW at 11:00, Irina Nersessova

Section 04, MW at 12:35, Michelle Wright

Section 05, TR at 12:35, Heidi Bowman

Section 06, TR at 2:00, Tara Lyons

This section will focus on “Gender in Utopian/ Dystopian Literature.” Beginning with Plato’s Republic and ending with fiction by Margaret Atwood and Kazuo Ishiguro, students will explore what it means to be “human” across the centuries and through the lens of fictional new worlds.

Section 07, MW at 3:35, Irina Nersessova

Section 08, TR at 3:35, Paula Ressler

Gender in the Humanities: Queer Lives and Ideas in Literature, Film, and other Cultural Expressions

In this course, we will inquire into and explore a wide range of written, visual, aural, and performed texts related to queer cultures, aesthetics, politics, and history. Through interacting and engaging with texts and with one another, we will investigate past and present concepts of sexual orientation and gender identity and expression; the nature of the continuing inequality, discrimination, and violence against sexual and gender minorities; and the contributions of LGBTQ+ people to society. Texts will include the novels: The Well of Loneliness (1928) and Giovanni’s Room (1956), essays and poems about LGBTQ lives, short stories about transgender lives today, along with various movie clips and documentary films.

Section 09, MW at 2:00, Kathleen Miller



ENG 130 Survey of American Literature

A historical study of the main movements in American literature. Readings of entire works representative of the movements.

Section 01, TR at 9:35, Jeremy Hurley



ENG 143 Unity and Diversity in Language

Study of the structure of language (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics) as it reflects cognition, social relations, cultural conventions, and seech communities.

Section 01, TR at 11:00, Lyudmila Belomoina

Section 02, MW at 9:35, Olga Cochran

Unity and Diversity of Language is an introductory course to a number of approaches linguists employ to study the language. The course will touch upon the origins of language, its history, structure, word formation, writing and other communicative systems, meaning, language variations and their role in society and culture. The course content is intense and intellectually challenging but it does not automatically imply that it is boring. To the contrary, most of the topics are going to be considered and explained through humor, streaming from different sources of human activity.

Section 03, T at 5:30, Cristina Sanchez-Martin



ENG 145 and 145.13 Writing in the Academic Disciplines

Introduction to research-based writing for multiple academic audiences.

145 Sections 1-12, various times and instructors

145.13 Sections 1-12, various times and instructors



ENG 150 World Literature to 14th Century

Readings in ancient and medieval literature, including Dante.

Section 01, hybrid, Rebecca Saunders



ENG 160 Introduction to Studies in Women's Writing

Readings in a variety of genres and historical periods.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, Krista Roberts



ENG 170 Foundations in Literature for Children

Introduction to genres of children's literature, including mythologies, fairy tales, picture books, poetry, and historical, multicultural, and current prose.

Section 01, TR at 8:00, Shelby Ragan

Section 03, MWF at 10:00, Agathe Lancrenon

Section 04, MWF at 11:00, Wesley Jacques

Section 05, TR at 2:00, Niall Nance-Carroll

Section 06, MWF at 1:00, Scott Pyrz

Section 07, MW at 3:35, Britni Williams



ENG 194 Introduction to English Education

This course is deisgned to introduce students to foundational concepts and issues associated with the teaching of high school English in diverse settings.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Eileen Bularzik



IDS 203 Nations and Narrations

Construction of national identities from cultural, philosophical, religious, and political empires using narrative discourse as a lens.

203.05 Africa, Section 02, MW at 11:00, Samuel Kamara

Nations and Narration: Sierra Leone

National literature is a very contentious site where writers reinforce national values and identity, challenge national, official history, satirize social and cultural foibles, and direct attention to political and economic injustice. These different kinds of narratives constitute the stories that characterize a nation’s history, culture, and identity.

This course explores the national narratives of Sierra Leone after its eleven-year civil war (1991 – 2002). It specifically examines the literature published after the civil war (both fiction and non-fiction) to see how writers perceive the war. We will study the effects of the generic choice (fiction and non-fiction) in telling stories about the war. Moreover, we will examine how these writers deal with issues of nationhood and national identity. What does it mean to be a nation? How is a positive national identity fostered? What is the role of citizens and government in nation building? How do these writers express hope and proffer solutions to that country’s political and economic problems? What is the link between literature and nationalism?

We will read some theoretical materials which I will post on Reggienet that will help us understand how literary production is, itself, a participation in discourse formation about national selfhood. But we will also see how such national self-reflection is mostly prompted by national disaster, political mismanagement, war, and nation-wide corruption. Thus, we will come to learn that national identity is not static but always changing, becoming, and reinvented to meet new challenges of human existence.


ENG 216 Studies in Eighteenth Century English Literature

Selected writers and genres from the restoration of Charles II to the crown in 1660 to the beginnings of Romanticism.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Katherine Ellison

Rape Culture, Gender, and Sexuality in the 18th Century

Our twenty-first-century culture likes to make all kinds of assumptions about how women were treated in the past, about what women were allowed and not allowed to do, about human rights, the evolution of gender and heteronormativity, and the stigmas of sexuality. This course will study the primary documents of one of the pivotal sexual and human rights revolutions of the past, beginning with the wild Restoration period and working through the eighteenth century to the beginning of the French Revolution. We will read legal documents, newspaper accounts, prison memoirs, life writing, drama, poetry, and fiction to better understand the history of rape culture, the roots of feminist activism, and the nonlinear, unpredictable progress of human rights across the past four centuries. As we explore the period between the return of womanizer Charles II to the throne in 1660, and the rise of bestselling women authors like Aphra Behn and Eliza Haywood, to the shocking escapades of lawyer, (misogynist?) life writer James Boswell at the end of the eighteenth century, we will build a foundation not only in history but also in genre and form, including but not limited to: early news and journalism, comedy, the personal essay, satire, the heroic couplet, life writing, and the novel.

Required readings will include: selections from The Newgate Calendar, Wycherley’s The Country Wife, Behn’s Oroonoko, Haywood’s Fantomina, Pope’s Rape of the Lock, Gay’s The Beggar’s Opera, Defoe’s Roxana, Walpole’s Castle of Otranto, Wollstonecraft’s Vindication of the Rights of Woman, poetry by John Wilmot, Aphra Behn, Jonathan Swift, and others.



ENG 218 Studies in the Victorian Period

Studies of texts from the 19th century.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Cynthia Huff

In this course we will consider works by a diverse group of Victorian writers and place them within their historical, political, and social contexts. Not only will we examine writers who have been traditionally regarded as major figures, but we will also read lesser known writers, many of whom were popular during the era, to enhance our understanding of the complexity of Victorian culture and the many voices which contributed to lively debate about what it meant to be a Victorian. We will consider the various literary genres the Victorians used, including some, such as the verse novel, which are not familiar today, and we will talk about the expansion of the reading public and print culture, which meant that most literate Victorians knew well what we’ll read in this course. The course will be structured thematically and emphasize broad cultural constructs, such as Progress, Empire, Family, and the Woman Question, in an effort to familiarize students with the crucial debates in Victorian society so that they understand how these affect the production of literature and culture and how literature and culture influence the ways in which such issues were conceptualized. Basically, we will try to learn to read, as much as possible, as the Victorians might have read.


ENG 227 Introduction to Creative Writing

Opportunity for creative writing of various kinds, such as poetry, fiction, and nonfiction.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Theresa Ward

Section 02, TR at 11:00, Steve Halle

Section 03, MW at 12:35, Kathleen Miller

Section 04, TR at 12:35, Thaddeus Stoklasa

Section 05, MW at 3:35, Kass Fleisher

Section 06, TR at 2:00, Benjamin Sutton



ENG 229 Introduction to Literary Genres

Formal and historical study of literary genres - poetry, drama, prose narrative - as structures of knowledge.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Samuel Kamara

This is an introductory course to literary genres such as the fiction: the novel, drama, poetry, and non-fiction: memoir and diary. In this class we will examine the various generic characteristics of fiction and non-fiction and see how the different uses of language: prosaic, dialogic, and poetic determine the texture and formation of genre. But we will also examine how creativity and truth form the defining line between fiction and non-fiction.

In this course, we will see how all of the above play out in, predominantly, the national literature of Sierra Leone in the 2000s. We will examine how different writers use different generic modes of telling their stories and also analyze how effective these choices are. By examining Sierra Leone’s post-civil-war literature as a focal point, it will be easy for us to analyze the effectiveness of the different generic forms of telling (poetic, dialogic, and prosaic) about the war.

As an introductory class, we will look at literary devices that are specific to, but also overlap among, certain genres such as dramatic irony, aside, metaphor, simile, personification, etc. We will examine how writers make use of these tools to tell their stories in order achieve certain effects among their readers. In other words, we will focus on the messages of these texts but also the manner in which they tell these messages.     

Section 02, TR at 12:35, Irina Nersessova



ENG 239 Multimodal Composition

Workshop emphasizing rhetorical analysis and composition of digital texts in a variety of modes including graphics, typography, audio, video, animation.

Section 01, TR at 9:35, Frank Macarthy

Now, perhaps more than ever, our daily lives require, invite, or otherwise call us to engage in multimodal communication—or how we make meaning through multiple modes of expression: linguistic, visual, spatial, gestural, and aural. 

In this course, we will consider, as digital storytellers, the potentials and constraints of multimodal communication. We will begin by considering the ways in which alphabetic text has been privileged as a primary method of creating and circulating knowledge, and we will, ourselves, attempt to challenge this privilege by crafting digital stories that explore multimodality and non-linear narrative forms. Students will examine contemporary influences on digital storytelling such as the sociocultural and institutional contexts of production, audience needs and expectations, as well as the goals of the digital storyteller. 

Students will be required to call on their own intellectual, emotional, and imaginative processes, as well as to develop their own skills in digital storytelling, interviewing, oral history collection, and the use of relevant digital storytelling tools. You are not required to have any expertise using digital technologies, though a willingness to explore, experiment (and yes, make mistakes) with readily available composing technologies is essential. Please note, however, that this is not a course on how to use various kinds of daily software. While I will point you to resources and tutorials, you are expected to review and make use of them outside of class time for assigned projects.



ENG 243 The Grammatical Structure of English

Linguistic description of present day American English, focusing on morphology and syntax.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Hyun-Sook Kang

Course Description
This course aims to introduce grammatical concepts and terminologies that will help us describe, explain, and analyze the structure of the English language. Topics to be covered include the notion of grammar, phrase structure, clause types, and basic sentence patterns. We will analyze the way words, phrases, and clauses work within sentences. We will also learn to describe and discuss the function of English at the level of syntax. Some time will be spent discussing linguistic patterns English-speaking children and learners of English as a second language demonstrate over the course of language development. Students will show mastery of course material via a variety of exercises, written exams, oral presentations and final research projects.

Required Text:
Hopper, Paul (2003). A Short Course in Grammar. Norton & Company Inc.

Section 02, MWF at 10:00, Susan Burt

“Ha-ha, at last!”  you think, perhaps with a low cackle. “After I take the Dreaded Grammar Course, I will be able to wield the Wicked Red Pen, instead of suffering as a low peon beneath it!”

That’s not you?  That’s not what you’re thinking?  OK, me neither.  That’s lucky, because the goals of this course do not include recruiting you into the ranks of the Grammar Police or any other law enforcement organization (for law enforcement, please choose a different major). 

Rather, I will expect you to gain a broad and basic understanding of the aims and means of different types of grammatical description, specifically pertaining to English. You should acquire a basic competence in grammatical description, including a very basic understanding of English morphology, and an understanding of English phrase and sentence syntax.  Most importantly, the student will acquire the ability to evaluate and critique claims about grammatical “correctness.”  In this course, we will see Grammar as a set of descriptive tools and terms, and style as a set of optional, variable and conventional preferences, closely linked with specific genres and uses.

Grades will be determined by student performance on the following items:

Exam 1                                    20%
Exam 2                                    20%
Exam 3                                    20%
4 in-class quizzes                    20%
homework                               20%

Textbook (required on Day 1):

Paul J. Hopper.  1999. A Short Course in Grammar.   New York: Norton

Section 03, TR at 2:00, Mahide Demirci



ENG 246 Advanced Composition

Extensice writing of essays developed in greater depth and sophistication in subject matter than those written in previous writing courses.

Section 01, TR at 9:35, Amy Robillard

To essay is to attempt. In this section of ENG 246, we will be devoting our energy to understanding the genre of the personal essay: what it is, why writers use it, how it functions, what it can help us understand about the world we live in. The personal essay invites uncertainty, humility, and complexity, and in this course we will work diligently to develop these habits of mind as we read and write personal essays with the goal of developing writing habits that sustain us in a world increasingly characterized by the will to certainty.

Section 02, TR at 2:00, Jan Neuleib

In this course you will be researching and discovering ideas for some deep interests of your own. Your task will be to investigate these topics and choose which ones you want to write about. I will ask you to contribute to one another’s developing ideas as you pursue the activities for the course, but the projects you complete will grow from conclusions you draw from your investigations. One major project will be presented for the class toward the end of the semester, but extensive research and writing will begin immediately.


ENG 247 Intermediate Creative Writing

Workshop in genre, with critical examination of its conventions.

247.02 Fiction, MW at 3:35, Joe Amato

Our reading will consist of a collection of eighty-six flash fiction pieces from around the world. For our purposes, flash fiction will mean fiction of roughly 1000 words. We’ll hold discussion and workshop sessions, everyone will submit two portfolios and participate in peer review, and I'll sit down with each of you twice during the semester to discuss your writing and to offer my evaluation of it.


ENG 249 Technical and Professional Writing I

Introduction to technical and professional writing. Includes study of manuals, reports, proposals, audience analysis, formatting, and style.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, Lisa Phillips

Section 02, MW at 11:00, Lee Brasseur

Section 03, MW at 2:00, Lee Brasseur

Section 04, MW at 12:35, Mijanur Rahman

Overall, as a result of this course, you will be ready to successfully deal with the technical communication challenges in whatever profession you choose in future.
This section of ENG 249 expects you to be from diverse disciplines that require you to complete this course as part of the degree. It is very likely that most of you will be working as subject matter experts in your chosen fields in future, but you will also need the skills of a technical and professional writer to thrive in an increasingly competitive workplace. This course will help you gain an added competitive edge in your intended profession by making you achieve the following learning outcomes.

  • To learn your future role as a professional in the workplace, especially as it relates to your responsibilities to develop professional and technical writing;
  • To understand, analyze and evaluate technical and professional documents;
  • To establish writing expertise in a range of professional and technical genres;
  • To analyze technical communication scenario rhetorically, and especially to develop sensitivity to audience or user needs in technical or professional writing;
  • To produce technical documents collaboratively; and
  • To reflect on and articulate what you learn about technical communication, and how you learn it.

This course hopes to achieve the above mentioned transformational goals and course level learning outcomes through a number of major projects, weekly reflections, assigned readings, and participation in in-class activities. You will receive detailed assignment sheets or project handouts on all major components of the course.
Required Materials

  • Markel, Mike. 2015. Technical Communication 11th ed. Boston and New York: Bedford/St. Martin. [N.B. You can buy its online version too as an alternative.]
  • Additional supplementary reading materials will be made available on ReggieNet.

Section 05, TR at 12:35, Sarah Warren-Riley

Section 06, TR at 3:35, Oriana Gilson

Section 07, MW at 3:35, Mijanur Rahman

Overall, as a result of this course, you will be ready to successfully deal with the technical communication challenges in whatever profession you choose in future.
This section of ENG 249 expects you to be from diverse disciplines that require you to complete this course as part of the degree. It is very likely that most of you will be working as subject matter experts in your chosen fields in future, but you will also need the skills of a technical and professional writer to thrive in an increasingly competitive workplace. This course will help you gain an added competitive edge in your intended profession by making you achieve the following learning outcomes.

  • To learn your future role as a professional in the workplace, especially as it relates to your responsibilities to develop professional and technical writing;
  • To understand, analyze and evaluate technical and professional documents;
  • To establish writing expertise in a range of professional and technical genres;
  • To analyze technical communication scenario rhetorically, and especially to develop sensitivity to audience or user needs in technical or professional writing;
  • To produce technical documents collaboratively; and
  • To reflect on and articulate what you learn about technical communication, and how you learn it.

This course hopes to achieve the above mentioned transformational goals and course level learning outcomes through a number of major projects, weekly reflections, assigned readings, and participation in in-class activities. You will receive detailed assignment sheets or project handouts on all major components of the course.
Required Materials

  • Markel, Mike. 2015. Technical Communication 11th ed. Boston and New York: Bedford/St. Martin. [N.B. You can buy its online version too as an alternative.]
  • Additional supplementary reading materials will be made available on ReggieNet.


ENG 251 Literature of the Bible II

Major idead and literary forms of the Christian Bible (New Testament) and Apocrypha.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Jan Neuleib

The literature of the Bible divides into many different genres across many centuries. In the New Testament course, we will bring our own personalities to the reading of the gospel stories and the letters of Paul and Peter. We will refer back to the range of types of literature in the Old Testament or Hebrew Scriptures since Jesus often quotes these texts, as does Paul. We will look at the ways that the stories of Jesus as Messiah have influenced story telling and lyrical presentation throughout the history of literature. We will look also at the representations in current literature that owe much to these earlier works, often without specific references in the revised versions of the stories and lyrics. Be prepared to enjoy bringing yourself to these stories and letters. In case you have not read the Gospels and letters, be prepared to see some fascinating contradictions and contrasts.


ENG 253 Introduction to Histories and Theories od Publishing

Study of historical and theoretical contexts in publishing, including book history, textual studies, and manuscript, print, and digital cultures.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, Robert McLaughlin

ENG 253, Sec. 1: Introduction to Histories and Theories of Publishing
Dr. Robert McLaughlin
Tuesday, Thursday 3:35-4:50

This course will examine the field of literary publishing in the United States as a mechanism of mediation between authors and readers.  The focus will be on the history of publishing with special emphasis on how changing technology has reframed a set of ongoing issues (risk of publication, copyright, censorship, marketing, distribution, and so on).  We will also examine some case studies in the relationship among author, text, and editor.

Class meetings will be discussion-based.  Each student will participate in a collaborative research presentation.  There will be four three-page essays and one research-based essay.

Texts I anticipate using include:

Eugene Exman, The House of Harper
Bennett Cerf, At Random
Jason Epstein, Book Business
Siva Vaidhyanathan, Copyrights and Copywrongs
Ted Striphas, The Late Age of Print
John B. Thompson, Merchants of Culture



ENG 254 Introduction to Professional Publishing

Study and practice of editorial, production, printing, and marketing processes involved with producing a book or journal.

Section 01, T at 1:00, Holms Troelstrup



ENG 260 History of Literature by Women

A historical overview of writing by women.

Section 01, MW at 12:35, Kass Fleisher

Through books and video we will look at literatures addressing contemporary women’s issues, as well as the history of class, sex, heterosexist, and race oppression. To aid discussion we’ll use short response papers; there will be a mid-term exam; and the class will decide together whether it wishes to prepare a paper or an activist project as its culminating task.


ENG 261 Women's Literature in a Global Context

Literature by women of diverse ethnicities to examine varieties of texts and their cultural construction.

Section 01, MW at 3:35, Rebecca Saunders



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ENG 266 Native American Literature and Culture

Study of Native American literature, orality, and culture.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, Angela Haas



ENG 271 Literature for Young Children

Analysis of works written for children ages 5 to 9, including multicultural picture books, fairy tales, poetry, and chapter books.

Section 01, Winter Session, online, Karen Coats

Section 02, TR at 9:35, Jan Susina

Spring 2017
English 271.1: Literature for Young Children. Tues. & Thurs.  9:35-10:50 a.m.
English 271.4: Literature for Young Children. Tues. & Thurs. 2:00-3:15 p.m.
Professor: Jan Susina

Description:
This course will read and discuss a variety of texts that are appropriate for child readers and pre-readers from ages five to nine.  A wide variety of materials that have been created or are given to children will be examined. These will include folk & literary fairy tales, fables, pictures books, chapter books, nursery rhymes, alphabet books, information books, and poetry -- as well as children’s media -- including music, films, and websites. While this is a course in children’s literature, it is also a university-level literature course, which means we will be using critical approaches to understand and appreciate these texts.  Since many students enrolled in Eng. 271 are preparing to become elementary school teachers, or librarians and it will be important to have an in-depth understanding of these texts.  The class will involve lecture, discussion, and small group work. Throughout the semester, there will be a series of short, in-class and homework assignments linked to the reading assignments. Students will write a research paper (7-10 pages) on a selected children's picture book.  Students will also write a short paper (3 pages) on a children's film.  There will be a midterm and final exam.

Required Texts:
M.C. Waldrep, Ed. Favorite Fairy Tales; 27 Stories by Brothers Grimm, Andersen
  Perrault and Others. Dover.
Hans Christian Andersen. The Little Mermaid and Other Fairy Tales. Dover
Classics.
Jon Scieszka & Lane Smith. The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales.
Puffin.
Joseph Jacobs, ed. The Fables of Aesop. Dover.
Arnold Lobel. Frog and Toad Are Friends. Harper Collins.
Philip Smith, ed. Favorite Poems of Childhood. Dover.
Beatrix Potter. The Complete Adventures of Peter Rabbit. Warne.
Margaret Wise Brown. Goodnight Moon. Harper Collins.
Crockett Johnson. Harold and the Purple Crayon. Harper Collins.
Dr. Seuss. The Cat in the Hat. Random House.
Maurice Sendak. Where the Wild Things Are. Harper Trophy.
Barbara Kerley. The Dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins. Harper Collins.
A.A. Milne. Winnie-the-Pooh. Puffin.
Beverly Cleary. Ramona the Brave. Harper Trophy.
Jennifer L. Holm & Matthew Holm.  Babymouse: Our Hero. Random House.

Section 03, TR at 2:00, Jan Susina

Spring 2017
English 271.1: Literature for Young Children. Tues. & Thurs.  9:35-10:50 a.m.
English 271.4: Literature for Young Children. Tues. & Thurs. 2:00-3:15 p.m.
Professor: Jan Susina

Description:
This course will read and discuss a variety of texts that are appropriate for child readers and pre-readers from ages five to nine.  A wide variety of materials that have been created or are given to children will be examined. These will include folk & literary fairy tales, fables, pictures books, chapter books, nursery rhymes, alphabet books, information books, and poetry -- as well as children’s media -- including music, films, and websites. While this is a course in children’s literature, it is also a university-level literature course, which means we will be using critical approaches to understand and appreciate these texts.  Since many students enrolled in Eng. 271 are preparing to become elementary school teachers, or librarians and it will be important to have an in-depth understanding of these texts.  The class will involve lecture, discussion, and small group work. Throughout the semester, there will be a series of short, in-class and homework assignments linked to the reading assignments. Students will write a research paper (7-10 pages) on a selected children's picture book.  Students will also write a short paper (3 pages) on a children's film.  There will be a midterm and final exam.

Required Texts:
M.C. Waldrep, Ed. Favorite Fairy Tales; 27 Stories by Brothers Grimm, Andersen
  Perrault and Others. Dover.
Hans Christian Andersen. The Little Mermaid and Other Fairy Tales. Dover
Classics.
Jon Scieszka & Lane Smith. The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales.
Puffin.
Joseph Jacobs, ed. The Fables of Aesop. Dover.
Arnold Lobel. Frog and Toad Are Friends. Harper Collins.
Philip Smith, ed. Favorite Poems of Childhood. Dover.
Beatrix Potter. The Complete Adventures of Peter Rabbit. Warne.
Margaret Wise Brown. Goodnight Moon. Harper Collins.
Crockett Johnson. Harold and the Purple Crayon. Harper Collins.
Dr. Seuss. The Cat in the Hat. Random House.
Maurice Sendak. Where the Wild Things Are. Harper Trophy.
Barbara Kerley. The Dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins. Harper Collins.
A.A. Milne. Winnie-the-Pooh. Puffin.
Beverly Cleary. Ramona the Brave. Harper Trophy.
Jennifer L. Holm & Matthew Holm.  Babymouse: Our Hero. Random House.



ENG 272 Literature for Middle Grades

Analysis of works written for children ages 9 to 13, including multicultural novels and information books, children's media, and culture.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Mary Jeanette Moran

This course focuses on literature written for and read by children between ages 9 and 13. While most young people still have a close connection to their families at this period in their development, they are also beginning to make stronger connections outside the family, with both individuals and communities. As we read texts from a variety of subgenres and time periods, we’ll consider some of these questions: How do these texts define family? What roles do the protagonists play in their families? How do children and adults interact within the family? What are the connections and tensions between the family and the larger society? To what extent can people choose their families? To what extent do books about families encourage readers to develop and express their ability for empathy? Depending on students’ interests, we may also discuss issues such as narrative voice, gender, class, race, and ideology. Most of our classes will be devoted to discussion, though we will also use class time for writing and for peer workshopping. In addition to thoughtful and interactive participation, your responsibilities include three papers, leading discussion with prepared discussion questions once during the semester, reading quizzes, and peer workshops on paper drafts.

Section 02, MW at 2:00, Mary Jeanette Moran



This course focuses on literature written for and read by children between ages 9 and 13. While most young people still have a close connection to their families at this period in their development, they are also beginning to make stronger connections outside the family, with both individuals and communities. As we read texts from a variety of subgenres and time periods, we’ll consider some of these questions: How do these texts define family? What roles do the protagonists play in their families? How do children and adults interact within the family? What are the connections and tensions between the family and the larger society? To what extent can people choose their families? To what extent do books about families encourage readers to develop and express their ability for empathy? Depending on students’ interests, we may also discuss issues such as narrative voice, gender, class, race, and ideology. Most of our classes will be devoted to discussion, though we will also use class time for writing and for peer workshopping. In addition to thoughtful and interactive participation, your responsibilities include three papers, leading discussion with prepared discussion questions once during the semester, reading quizzes, and peer workshops on paper drafts.

ENG 283 Rhetorical Theory and Applications

Critical and analytical examination of the nature and historical development of rehetorical theory and its applications to contemporary discourse.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Amy Robillard

Section 02, TR at 2:00, Amy Robillard



ENG 284 Poetry

Critical and analytical examination of the nature and historical development of poetry.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Joe Amato

The difficulty of teaching a course in poetry, as with any art form, isn't that poetry is so difficult, but that poetry is constantly trying to bring into our midst those things that aren't completely understood, that haven't been anticipated, that can't be easily defined, and that aren't always congenial to the very idea of courses and textbooks and teaching and institutions. The meaning of poems isn't always clear even to their authors, just as the greatest experience of art often leaves us without a vocabulary to describe it. To complicate matters further, the things that poetry brings into our midst are often the very things that might give us hope. This doesn't mean that we ought not to try to understand what's going on in a given poem, and use all of the tools we have at our disposal to help us to understand it. But we have also to see art as an encounter with something that might resonate differently each time we confront it. And so, to begin, we might do well to cultivate a habit of trying to tease out of our experience of poetry both meaning and the sound of meaning. We need to find words for our experience that do justice to the crafted, technical aspects of a poem; to its textual register, its debt to the cultural and social surrounds that give rise to it, and to which it contributes; and to those modulations of affect and spirit that animate our deeper appreciation for its aesthetic demands. Consider this course a first step in that direction, then, a baby step, with the aim of coming to grips with some of the poetry of the first half of the twentieth century, published here and abroad.


ENG 287 Independent Study

Arrange with instructor.



ENG 291 Undergraduate Teaching Experience

Arrange with instructor.



ENG 296 The Teaching of Literature

Examines current scholarship in the teaching of literature at the secondary level; integrates theories of teaching literature with teaching practice. Includes Clinical Experiences: 10 hours, Type 1-5 and 9.

Section 01, TR at 11:00, Kristen Strom

Section 02, TR at 12:35, Kristen Strom



ENG 297 The Teaching of Writing

Examines current scholarship in the teaching of writing at the secondary level; integrates theories of teaching writing with teaching practice. Includes Clinical Experiences: 15 hours, Type 1-5 and 9.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Linda Lienhart



ENG 299 Independent Honors Study

Arrange with instructor.



ENG 300 Senior Seminar

Capstone course for English majors, synthesizing the main dimensions of English studies. Requires senior project and portfolio.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, Sally Parry

Section 02, TR at 11:00, Gabe Gudding

Section 03, TR at 12:35, Ricardo Cruz

Section 04, TR at 2:00, Susan Kalter



ENG 320 Chaucer

Literary and linguistic study of the major works of Chaucer; text in Middle English.

Section 01, TR at 11:00, Susan Kim



ENG 341 Introduction to Descriptive Linguistics

Aims and methods of linguistic science. Nature and functions of language: phonology, morphology, syntax, variation.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, K. Aaron Smith



ENG 343 Cross-Cultural Issues in TESOL

THe relationship between language, culture, and cultural awareness in the learning and teaching of English as a Second Language.

Section 01, MWF at 9:00, Susan Burt

REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS:

Helen Spencer-Oatey 2008.  Culturally Speaking: Culture, Communication and Politeness Theory.   London and New York: Continuum.

There will also be a course packet, available at Pip’s in the Bone Student Center.

DESCRIPTION OF COURSE:

The goal of communicative language teaching is to equip learners to be able to interact gracefully and effectively with native speakers of the target language.  Knowledge of grammar and lexicon alone will not equip learners adequately for these out-of-classroom tasks.  This course examines the cultural and pragmatic aspects of language- and culture-learning, from the perspectives of interactional sociolinguistics and intercultural and cross-cultural pragmatics.  We will explore one area in depth, the area of speech act realization, through a cooperative research project.  The results of research in this area lead us back to the classroom, where implications for pedagogy and materials will be explored.

FORMAT OF COURSE:

Classes will follow the lecture-discussion format.  There will be a midterm exam, a final exam, a research presentation and a research paper, both based on the cooperative research project.  In addition, graduate students will prepare an annotated bibliography in connection with the final paper.



ENG 344 TESOL: Theoretical Foundations

Linguistic theories: first and second language acquisition; cognitive, affective, and cultural factors in teaching English as a Second Language.

Section 02, MW at 2:00, Hyun-Sook Kang

Course Description
This course will introduce key concepts and issues in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages). Topics to be covered include the nature of first and second language acquisition, linguistic, cognitive, affective, and socio-cultural factors in developmental processes and learning outcomes, and the role of input and instruction in language learning. The course will provide opportunities to critically evaluate a variety of approaches to TESOL and research findings. Class discussion will further attempt to make implications for language teaching in the classroom and beyond.

Course Objectives
In this course, students will:
1. Learn the fundamental concepts and principles of the knowledge base pertaining to the learning of English as a second or foreign language;
2. Learn to critically evaluate second language learning theories and engage in a systematic investigation of the knowledge base to inform their own or others' teaching practices; and
3. Learn how to plan and manage a second language class effectively and how to evaluate and selectively apply a range of teaching strategies as appropriate to their students' needs and characteristics

Required Textbooks:
Ortega, L (2009). Understanding second language acquisition. New York, NY: Routledge.


ENG 347.02 Advanced Creative Writing: Prose

Workshop format for individual projects; related theory.

Section 01, TR at 9:35, Ricardo Cruz



ENG 348 Playwriting

Playwriting techniues of selected masters with practical application of techniques in writing original plays.

Section 01, M at 5:30, Paula Ressler

Join English, theater, and other majors working together and sharing their skills and ideas to create a rich interdisciplinary experience. No playwriting, theater, or acting experience is required. You can take this course for either English or Theater credit.

In this course, everyone will write a 10-minute play, a work-in-progress, that we will produce. The plays will be cast with students in the class and other volunteers in a showcase at the end of the semester when each play will receive constructive feedback from audience members and invited guests. In addition to writing plays, we will read samples of successful 10-minute plays and discuss what professional playwrights can teach us about the craft.

This class is an opportunity for people who already know how exciting it is to write for live theater and for those who want to find out. You will get a sense of this amazingly collaborative art form as we work together during the semester to say what is meaningful to us and what will matter to others, writing in a genre that can’t help but generate new life energy.



ENG 349 Technical Writing II

Instruction and practice in editing, proposals, and analytical writing; attention given to style manuals, research writing, and (as needed) publication.

Section 01, M at 5:30, Lee Brasseur



ENG 350 Visible Rhetoric

Document design as a rhetorical activity and the application of theories of visible rhetoric to document production.

Section 01, TR at 11:00, Elise Hurley

Section 02, TR at 2:00, Elise Hurley



ENG 358 Topics in Publishing Studies

Topics in specific theories, histories, trends, methodologies, practices, or figures in publishing.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Tara Lyons

Textbook Publishing and Digital Editions: What Really Helps Students Learn Shakespeare?

Over the past decade, digital editions of Shakespeare’s works have sprung up across the textbook market. While many of these editions have been designed for use in the undergraduate classroom, Shakespeare instructors across the U.S. and U.K. are wondering how “going digital” will affect students’ learning. Our goal in ENG 358 is to “test-drive” these new editions and evaluate their design and pedagogical value from a variety of perspectives: the textbook publishing industry, Shakespeare textual studies, and literature pedagogy.

In course readings, discussions, and assignments, ENG 358 will explore how textbooks shape students’ experiences with literature. We will ask: How have rising costs in education influenced the textbook market? How do publishers conceive of “access” to digital textbooks? How have shifts in Shakespeare studies influenced the content of new editions? How can textual editors help make Shakespeare’s works accessible to modern readers? What do twenty-first century students need from their textbooks and what specifically do they need from them to learn Shakespeare? Each student in the course will research, design, and conduct a study that investigates how learning Shakespeare is mediated by digital and print textbooks. No prior coursework on Shakespeare is required. Undergraduate and graduate students in publishing, literary studies, secondary education are especially welcome.



ENG 372 Studies in Contemporary Literature for Young People

Advanced critical examination of 20th and 21st century literature for children and young adults with emphasis on trends and research.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Jan Susina

Spring 2017
English 372 Contemporary Literature for Young People/ Origins of Modern Literature for Young People. Tues. & Thurs. 12:35- 1:50 p.m.
Professor: Jan Susina

Description:
This course is intended to introduce students to growth of modern British and American children's literature during the last one hundred years.  The course will also take occasional look back significant earlier children’s texts that influenced modern and contemporary writers for children.  This course will examine the changing concepts of childhood and how children's books help to establish an ideology of childhood.  The course will focus primarily on influential children’s texts from the Anglo-American tradition that have been published during the twentieth and twenty-first century.  The course will also introduce students to a variety of critical approaches to children's literature and examine the development of the criticism of children's literature as an academic field. Undergraduates will be required to write one short research paper (8-10 pages), while graduate students will write one short paper (8-10 pages) and one longer critical paper (15-18 pages).   In addition, all students will write a book analysis (3-5 pages) on a significant illustrated children’s text selected from a list provided by the instructor.   A midterm exam and a final exam will be given. Graduate students will have the opportunity to lead class discussion on one of the assigned texts. All students will be expected to regularly attend class, and actively contribute to class discussion. The course should be of interest to students working in Children’s Literature, Education, Popular Culture, Visual Studies, and American Studies.

Required Texts:
L. Frank Baum.  The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.  Dover Evergreen Children’s Classics.
Lewis Carroll. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Dover Thrift Edition
Andrew Lang, ed. The Blue Fairy Book. Dover.
Jon Scieszka.  The Stinky Cheeseman and Other Fairly Stupid Tales. Illustrated by Lane Smith.
Puffin Books.
Beatrix Potter. The Complete Adventures of Peter Rabbit. Puffin.
A.A. Milne.  Winnie-the-Pooh.  Illustrated by Ernest Shepard. Puffin.
Quentin Blake, ed. The Penguin Book of Nonsense Verse. Penguin
Dr. Seuss.  The Cat in the Hat. Random House.
Margaret Wise Brown.  Goodnight Moon.  Illustrated by Clement Hurd.  Harper Collins.
Crockett Johnson. Harold and the Purple Crayon. Harper Collins.
E.B. White.  Charlotte’s Web.  Illustrated by Garth Williams. Harper Collins.
Ezra Jack Keats. The Snowy Day.  Puffin.
Maurice Sendak.  Where the Wild Things Are. Harper Collins.
Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women, ed. Elaine Showalter. Penguin.
Judy Blume. Are You There God, It’s Me Margaret? Delacorte Books.
S.E. Hinton. The Outsiders. Speak.
J.K. Rowling.  Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. Illustrated by Mary Grandpre. Scholastic.



ENG 375 Young Adult Literature

Advanced critical examination of literature for young adults with emphasis on trends and research.

Section 01, TR at 9:35, Niall Nance-Carroll

Section 02, M at 5:30, Karen Coats

Psychologists and cultural critics agree that adolescence is a sociocultural phenomenon, the experience of which is highly dependent on the values, material goals, and affluence of a particular society.  It is a time for negotiating identity in the matrix of discourses of gender, race, nationality, ethnicity, technology, spirituality, embodiment, and ethics. But recent research on adolescence indicates that the experience of adolescence is also a biological one: teens have distinct ways of thinking and feeling that are related to the structure and growth of their brains. What stories, then, do contemporary authors of young adult literature tell, and how do they affect and influence a readership that is biologically predisposed to lead with their emotions while they are actively engaged in sorting out their identities and their values? To approach these questions, we will be reading books and viewing films that inspire strong emotional responses and/or produce a “shallowness of affect” while also asking readers to think about contemporary issues such as the growth in surveillance culture (dust off your Foucault), what it means to be white/black/brown/straight/gay/male/female/zombie/drunk /dying/autistic/other, and who gets to decide what such identity categories mean anyway. The theoretical orientation of the class is a synthesis of neuropsychoanalysis, cognitive poetics, cultural theory, and multimodal engagement.  
Required Texts:
Alexie, Sherman, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-time Indian
Brosgol, Vera, Anya’s Ghost
Heppermann, Christine, Poisoned Apples: Poems for You, My Pretty
Lockhart, E., The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks
Meehl, Brian, You Don’t Know About Me
Smith, Andrew, The Alex Crow
Stewart, Martin, Riverkeep
Tharp, Tim, The Spectacular Now
Watson, Renée, This Side of Home
Wood, Fiona, Cloudwish
Yang, Gene Luen, Boxers & Saints (boxed set)
Yeahpau, Thomas M., X-Indian Chronicles: The Book of Mausape
Bend it Like Beckham
(film we will watch in class)
Me, Earl, and the Dying Girl (film we will watch in class—bring tissues)
Theory readings as assigned (available on ReggieNet)



ENG 384 Introduction to Cultural Theory

Introduction to the history and practice of cultural theory.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Paul Ugor

This course is an introduction to the expansive interdisciplinary field of cultural theory. We will examine the foundations of cultural theory in Marxism, Psychoanalysis, Semiotics, Postmodernism, Feminism, Eco-criticism, Postcolonialism, and Queer Studies. Our primary focus will be the specific ways in which cultural theory has radically shifted cultural and critical analysis away from abstract Universalist discourses to a much more grounded (material), contemporary (present-day) and every day (ordinary) life. Essentially, the course will serve as a crucial guide to the most important theories in the arts, humanities and the social sciences. The course will be especially useful for students in the field of literary and cultural studies, communication studies, visual cultures, theatre and performing arts, ethnic, gender, queer, and postcolonial studies.


ENG 394 TESOL Practicum

Observation, case studies, tutoring, instructional assistance, and some teaching experience in English as a Second Language.

Section 01, W at 1:00, Hyun-Sook Kang

Course goals: 
The TESOL Practicum offers students seeking an endorsement in TESOL the opportunity to acquire clinical hours while observing and participating in ESL instruction in an Illinois public school.  The Practicum also offers graduate students pursuing the graduate certificate in TESOL the opportunity to obtain clinical experience in a local adult ESL center.  Students should have completed at least two of the TESOL courses (343, 344, 345, and 346) in addition to the prerequisite to these (391) before enrolling in 394, since the assignments in this course will require students to use the concepts discussed in those courses to structure their observations.  

This practicum is intended to provide you with focused observation of teachers of English to non-native speaking learners, practice for you in teaching such learners and an opportunity to view and evaluate yourself as a teacher, and an opportunity for you to provide a service to both the TESOL profession as well as to a specific community of learners.  Much of the work for the course will be completed as an independent study during which you will organize, manage, and complete observations, tutorials, etc. on your own.  

Required texts will be available on the course management system 



ENG 396 The Writing Seminar

Concentration upon a major writing project and the formulation of an individual Writing Portfolio.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, Jeremy Hurley



ENG 398 Professional Practice: Internship in English

Supervised field experience in English with local, state, national, and international businesses, agencies, institutions(including colleges and universities), and organizations.

Section 01, Arrange, Jim Kalmbach



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