2018 Graduate Course Offerings

For the most current schedule information, please visit the University's Course Finder.

Summer 2018

ENG 341 Introduction to Descriptive Linguistics

Aims and methods of linguistic science. Nature and functions of language: phonology, morphology, syntax, variation.

Section 01, MTWR at 11:00, 4 weeks beginning 6/18, K. Aaron Smith



ENG 358 Topics in Publishing Studies

Topics in specific theories, histories, trends, methodologies, practices, or figures in publishing.

Section 01, study abroad, beginning 5/21, Brian Rejack



ENG 375 Young Adult Literature

Advances critical examination of literature for young adults with emphasis on trends and research.

Section 01, online, 4 weeks beginning 5/21, Karen Coats

Young adult literature is a vibrant, expanding genre that reflects many of the concerns of growing up and creating and claiming a personal identity in a highly mediated, ethically fragmented culture. At the same time, most of the books are compulsively readable and entertaining, putting a good story above all else. This fully online, asynchronous class will consist of four week-long modules, (from May 21-June 15) that focus on a set of ideas that the texts under consideration engage with in different ways. Each module requires the reading of two or three young adult novels and one critical article, and then taking reading quizzes, participating in graded online discussion groups, and completing a section of the “rolling final.” In addition, you will be asked to complete a project related to a YA genre of your choice, which will need to be submitted by July 1st. The entire course will be posted on ReggieNet by May 1st, so you can work ahead for everything except the weekly discussions and rolling final questions. (The books for week 2 are quite long, and also emotionally challenging, so you will want to read them in advance.)
Week 1:
The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-time Indian, by Sherman Alexie
Anya’s Ghost, by Vera Brosgol
This Side of Home, by Renee Watson
Week 2:
Picture Us in the Light, by Kelly Loy Gilbert
Revolution, by Jennifer Donnelly
Week 3:
Feed, by M. T. Anderson
Glitter, by Aprilynne Pike
Shatter, by Aprilynne Pike
Week 4:
Students will be asked to read two or three books of their choice from a list focused on a particular genre. (Choices include Comedy/Fantasy/Realism/Horror/Historical Fiction/Dystopia/Films and TV/Postmodern fiction) For each book (or film), you will respond to a set of questions. Additionally, you will participate in a discussion group for that genre. There will be no rolling final questions for this week. Instead, your final project will be based on these books, but will not be due until July 1st. You will have several choices for the format of your final project; more details on the requirements for the final project will be included when the class is posted.



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ENG 409.06 Teaching of Writing in High School/Middle School: The Writing Project

Improving the quality of writing instruction in middle and high schools.

Section 01, MTWRF at 9:00, 3 weeks beginning 7/9, Jan Neuleib



ENG 498 Professional Practice: Internship in English

Supervised field experience in English with local, state, national, and international businesses, agencies, institutions (including colleges and universities), and organizations.

Section 01, arrange, Elise Hurley



ENG 560 Seminar in Literature and Culture

Research in selected areas of literary and/or cultural study framed within the contexts of pedagogy and English Studies.

Section 01, hybrid at 9:00, 4 weeks beginning 5/21, Paul Ugor

One of the remarkable things to happen in the global literary scene, especially beginning from the mid-twentieth Century, has been the explosion of literary productivity from the former colonies of European empires in Africa, India, the Caribbean, Asia, Latin America, and settler colonies such as Canada, Australia, New Zealand and other such places touched by imperial conquests. These growing constellations of writing have now come to be known globally as postcolonial literatures. This literature, often politically inclined, re-examines and problematizes the history of European colonization all over the world as it also reflects on its spiraling aftermath. The primary agenda of Postcolonial literature, then, Ato Quayson tells us, involves ‘‘the representation of experiences of various kinds including those of slavery, migration, oppression and resistance, difference, race, gender, space and place, and the responses to the discourse of imperial Europe’’ (Cambridge History of Postcolonial Literature 06). This course examines the history, politics and poetics of this genre of world literature in English from the postcolony. The aim of the course, then, is to examine some of the key writers, thinkers, texts, themes, and trends associated with postcolonialism, and discourses of Postcoloniality, nationhood and empire.      

Primary Texts
Tomson Highway, Kiss of the Fur Queen (Canada)
Ken Saro Wiwa, A Month and a Day (Nigeria)
David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon (US)
Aime Cesaire, A Tempest (Martinique)
Jack Davies, Kullark (Australia)
Ayi Kwei Armah, The Beautiful Ones Are Not Yet Born (Ghana)

Recommended Text (Optional):
Ato Quayson (Ed.). The Cambridge History of Postcolonial Literature. Cambridge University Press, 2012.
Brian Crow & Chris Banfield. An Introduction to Postcolonial Theatre. Cambridge University Press, 1996.
Diana Brydon. Postcolonialism: Critical Concepts in Literary and Cultural Studies. Routledge, 2000. 
C.L. Innes. The Cambridge Introduction to Postcolonial Literatures in English. Cambridge University Press, 2007.



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Fall 2018

ENG 321 Studies in Drama

Study of the movements, figures, historical periods, or contexts of drama.

Section 01, W at 5:30, William McBride



ENG 341 Introduction To Descriptive Linguistics

Aims and methods of linguistic science. Nature and functions of language: phonology, morphology, syntax, variation.

Section 02, MWF at 11:00, Susan Burt



ENG 345 TESOL: Methods and Materials

Methodologies and techniques for teaching English as a Second Language; evaluation of materials for various levels and instructional goals. Includes Clincical Experiences.

Section 01, W at 5:00, Lisya Seloni



ENG 346 Assessment and Testing in ESL

Assessing oral and written proficiency in English as a Second Language.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, Mahide Demirci



ENG 347.01 Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry

Workshop format for individual projects; related theory.

Section 01, M at 5:30, Duriel Harris

Attending to poetry as the art of language (in prose and verse) and poetics as necessary interrogations surrounding making, this studio/workshop/seminar will function as a dynamic space for interrogation, discovery, and experimentation in the generation and presentation of new work. Over the course of the term we will take up “withness” as a primary mode of making—engaging with works that inspire us to try on ekphrasis, transmedia writing, dramatic scenes, polyvocal works, performance, and paratextual prose among other things. Experimentation with making via commonly accessible technologies (i.e. social media) and open source software (i.e. audio and video editing) is encouraged but not required. Android smartphones/tablets and MAC iPhones/iPads welcome.

Please note:
We'll be experimenting outside of the usual poetry "comfort zone" medium of print but will be working largely in print, so print-loving poets need not be wary.



ENG 349 Technical Writing II

Instruction and practice in editing, proposals, and analytical writing; attention given to style manuals, research writing, and (as needed) publication. Computer assisted.

Section 01, TR at 11:00, Erika Sparby

This is an advanced course designed to introduce you to the theories, issues, and practices of professional and technical communication. This course is designed with two primary student audiences in mind—those of you who plan to enter technical fields, and those of you who plan to work in a variety of writing and communication fields—both of which will require you to write and design documents on a regular basis and for a variety of contexts. As such, this course is grounded in rhetorical principles (such as purpose, audience, arrangement, style, ethics, etc.) and asks you to apply them to professional and technical communication contexts and genres. It is also based in a cultural studies approach that asks writers to make thoughtful considerations of both local and global audiences with a wide range of backgrounds, experiences, and needs. Projects include basic memos and reports, as well as performing risk assessments and making decisions, developing policies, and designing effective documents.

Section 02, MW at 12:35, TBD



ENG 350 Visible Rhetoric

Document design as a rhetorical activity and the application of theories of visible rhetoric to document production.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Elise Hurley



ENG 355 Forensic Bibliography and Archival Editing

History of print culture from orality to digital text; introduction to principles and practices of bibliographic ivestigation and scholarly editing.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, Tara Lyons



ENG 357 Studies in Creative Writing

Survey of theories creative writers explicitly and implicitly employ and consider. Includes editing, analysis, and writing of creative and theoretical texts.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, Gabriel Gudding

This is a reading-intensive survey course in the history and sociology of the institutions, theories, practices, and material forces that give rise to literary production. By the end of this course, students will better understand how current and past influential theories, as well as cultural and economic conditions affect writers, readers, editors and the texts these actors produce and police. We will examine the coincidental and arbitrary (uncontrollable, non-willed) nature of valuation and taste, and the variety of ways aesthetic evaluation and taste are policed – in light of rigorous studies (not mere theoretical assertion) about the intermeshing of material and cultural capital, neurology, social psychology, ideology and practice in the genesis and policing of creative texts. Students will come to comprehend the nature of professional dialogue in publishing and creative writing, and the wide range of possible ideas and conditions underlying the production of literary texts now and in the past.

I designed this course especially to benefit creative writers, students of literature, students of publishing, and anyone else interested in artistic production. As far as I can tell, this course is unusual; I have not seen a course like it in the curricula of other universities.

The course will have three major foci (see below for course bibliography, a finer schematic of the course plan, and its calendar):

1). Major statements of literary and critical theory relevant to literary production.

2). Economic and Intellectual History. Literary intellectual history, the impact of global economic historical forces on literary production in Europe and the Americas from the 1790s to the present.

3). Sociology & Social Psychology (including neurology & findings in collective cognition and perception). Sociology of art, taste, and artistic production. Specific attention will be paid to understanding the structure and material conditions underlying the problem of the “ideology of charismatic creativity."



ENG 365 Movements and Periods in African-American Literature and Culture

Advanced critical study of major movements and periods in African-American literature.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, Chris De Santis



ENG 374 Storytelling

The art of storytelling based on knowledge of folklore heritage with experiences in oral transmission of literature in a variety of settings.

Section 01, R at 5:30, Karen Coats

Stories and storytelling are foundational to human experience. We tell stories to preserve our individual and cultural memories, share experience, and project possible futures. Our first way of understanding the world is through story, and we continue to use story to explain the world to ourselves, to explain ourselves to others, and to explain ourselves to ourselves. In this class, we will approach storytelling from multiple angles: from theories of why we tell stories and why and how we respond to them, to examinations of how stories work in literature and everyday life, and finally, to techniques of how we can shape and tell stories in effective, entertaining, and multimodal ways.
Required Texts:
Bardugo, Leigh, The Language of Thorns
Gottschall, Jonathan, The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human
Leitman, Margot, Long Story Short: The Only Storytelling Guide You’ll Even Need
Pratchett, Terry, The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents

Other required texts will vary depending on the module chosen.
Format:
The course will be divided into three phases. In the first phase, we will read and discuss theories of storytelling and explore the elements that go into crafting effective stories. The second phase will be devoted to independent, partner, and/or small group work: students will choose the most relevant module for their own goals to study in depth and develop a final project. The available modules focus on storytelling for different purposes and contexts, including storytelling in the corporate workplace; storytelling in education; culturally specific folk narratives; transmedial storytelling; digital storytelling; and professional oral performance. The final phase will consist of the presentation and critique of the final projects, which will include a creative and critical component. The creative component will involve the development and presentation of a variety of types of stories; the critical component will grow out of the research performed in the chosen module.



ENG 375 Young Adult Literature

Advanced critical examination of literature for young adults with emphasis on trends and research.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Karen Coats

Psychologists and cultural critics agree that adolescence is a sociocultural phenomenon, the experience of which is highly dependent on the values, material goals, and affluence of a particular society.  It is a time for negotiating identity in the matrix of discourses of gender, race, nationality, ethnicity, technology, spirituality, embodiment, and ethics. But recent research on adolescence indicates that the experience of adolescence is also a biological one: teens have distinct ways of thinking and feeling that are related to the structure and growth of their brains. What stories, then, do contemporary authors of young adult literature tell, and how do they affect and influence a readership that is biologically predisposed to lead with their emotions while they are actively engaged in sorting out their identities and their values? To approach these questions, we will be reading books and viewing films that inspire strong emotional responses and/or produce a “shallowness of affect” while also asking readers to think about what it means to be white/black/brown/straight/gay/fluid/victim/bully/dying/neurodiverse/other in contemporary terms, and who gets to decide what such identity categories mean anyway. The theoretical orientation of the class is a synthesis of neuropsychoanalysis, cognitive poetics, cultural theory, and multimodal engagement.  
Required texts:

Alexie, Sherman, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-time Indian
Brosgol, Vera, Anya’s Ghost
Elliott, David, Bull
Gilbert, Kelly Loy, Picture Us in the Light
Niven, Jennifer, All the Bright Places
Older, Daniel José, Shadowshaper
Reyl, Hilary, Kids Like Us
Tharp, Tim, The Spectacular Now
Watson, Renée, This Side of Home
Yang, Gene Luen, American Born Chinese
Yeahpau, Thomas M., X-Indian Chronicles: The Book of Mausape

Films screened in class:
Me, Earl, and the Dying Girl
Smoke Signals

Class Format:
ENG 375 is discussion-heavy. You will be asked to engage in critical discussions of the texts and articles that we read, lead a discussion with a partner, keep a daybook, write an analytical paper, and complete a final project of your choice.

Section 02, TR at 2:00, Karen Coats

Psychologists and cultural critics agree that adolescence is a sociocultural phenomenon, the experience of which is highly dependent on the values, material goals, and affluence of a particular society.  It is a time for negotiating identity in the matrix of discourses of gender, race, nationality, ethnicity, technology, spirituality, embodiment, and ethics. But recent research on adolescence indicates that the experience of adolescence is also a biological one: teens have distinct ways of thinking and feeling that are related to the structure and growth of their brains. What stories, then, do contemporary authors of young adult literature tell, and how do they affect and influence a readership that is biologically predisposed to lead with their emotions while they are actively engaged in sorting out their identities and their values? To approach these questions, we will be reading books and viewing films that inspire strong emotional responses and/or produce a “shallowness of affect” while also asking readers to think about what it means to be white/black/brown/straight/gay/fluid/victim/bully/dying/neurodiverse/other in contemporary terms, and who gets to decide what such identity categories mean anyway. The theoretical orientation of the class is a synthesis of neuropsychoanalysis, cognitive poetics, cultural theory, and multimodal engagement.  
Required texts:

Alexie, Sherman, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-time Indian
Brosgol, Vera, Anya’s Ghost
Elliott, David, Bull
Gilbert, Kelly Loy, Picture Us in the Light
Niven, Jennifer, All the Bright Places
Older, Daniel José, Shadowshaper
Reyl, Hilary, Kids Like Us
Tharp, Tim, The Spectacular Now
Watson, Renée, This Side of Home
Yang, Gene Luen, American Born Chinese
Yeahpau, Thomas M., X-Indian Chronicles: The Book of Mausape

Films screened in class:
Me, Earl, and the Dying Girl
Smoke Signals

Class Format:
ENG 375 is discussion-heavy. You will be asked to engage in critical discussions of the texts and articles that we read, lead a discussion with a partner, keep a daybook, write an analytical paper, and complete a final project of your choice.



ENG 384 Introduction to Cultural Theory

Introduction to the history and practice of cultural theory.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Paul Ugor

This course is an introduction to the expansive interdisciplinary field of cultural theory. We will examine the foundations of cultural theory in Marxism, Psychoanalysis, Semiotics, Postmodernism, Feminism, Eco-criticism, Postcolonialism, and Queer Studies.  Our primary focus will be the specific ways in which cultural theory has radically shifted critical analysis away from abstract Universalist discourses to a much more grounded (material), contemporary (present-day) and every day (ordinary) life. Essentially, the course will serve as a crucial guide to the most important theories in the arts, humanities and the social sciences. The course will be especially useful for students in the field of literary and cultural studies, communication studies, visual cultures, theatre and performing arts,  ethnic, gender, queer, and postcolonial studies

Recommended Texts:
Imre Szeman & Timothy Kaposy (Eds.). Cultural Theory: An Anthology. West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell, 2011. (Required)
Paul Smith & Alexander Riley. Cultural Theory: An Introduction. 2nd Ed. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2009. (Required) 
Simon Malpas & Paul Wake (Eds.). The Routledge Companion to Critical and Cultural Theory. 2nd ed. London & New York: Routledge, 2013. (Recommended)
Peter Barry. Beginning Theory: An Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1995. (Recommended)



ENG 394 TESOL Practicum

Observation, case studies, tutoring, instructional assistance, and some teaching experience in English as a Second Language.

Section 01, R at 1:00, Lisya Seloni



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ENG 400 Independent Study

Directed independent study in an area of English Studies.



ENG 401 Introduction to Graduate Study

Introduction to bibliography, methods of research, critical evaluation of scholarship, and recent developments in literary theory and criticism.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Katherine Ellison

A course introducing graduate studies should be a practical as well as theoretical foreword to the methodologies and professions of advanced scholarship in English. This semester, it is also an exploration of the existential and affective stakes of pursuing knowledge and laboring within an institution of higher education for self-fulfillment – and employment – either within or beyond the bookshelf and the classroom. We will discuss the weight of the “shoulds” of graduate study – what you should be doing, what you should be reading, what you should be writing – with the emotional, intellectual, and even physical consequences, navigating the “whys” and “hows” (Why am I really doing this? Why do I want to teach? How will I balance work and family? How will I stay healthy?). Practically, we will discuss, and complete exercises aligned with, the trajectory of the graduate and postgraduate career, from researching the archives to theorizing to networking to conferencing to publishing in diverse genres and media to reviewing to job hunting to working to paying off debt, and we will talk honestly about all the things we as academics must manage on a uniquely squeezed timeline: students, research, service, family, finances, and health. Theoretically, we will survey the present state of English Studies and the questions and concerns that characterize the disciplines represented in our graduate program, with attention to the strengths of our faculty and the structure of our curriculum. Personally, we will also pay attention to the preservation of your own wellness, sharing strategies for staying focused on what is important to you, those you love, your students, and your discipline.


ENG 402 Teaching Composition

Introduction to theory, research, and practice in the teaching of composition.

Section 01, T at 5:30, Joyce Walker



ENG 413 Medieval Literatures and Cultures

Topics in the literatures and cultures of England from the eighth to the sixteenth century.

Section 01, T at 5:30, Susan Kim



ENG 440 Studies in English Linguistics

Advanced study and research in various aspects of the English language.

Section 01, M at 2:00, Lisya Seloni



ENG 441 The Linguistic Structure of English for TESOL Professionals

Advanced study of the morphology and syntax of Modern English in preparations for teaching English to speakers of other languages.

Section 01, MWF at 9:00, Susan Burt



Eng 447.02 Creative Writing Seminar: Prose

Practice in the writing of fiction for graduate level or professional writers.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Ricardo Cruz



ENG 457 Creative Writing Pedagogy

Theory and practice of the teaching of creative writing at the post-secondary level.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, Gabriel Gudding

The first purpose of this class is to provide an institutional and intellectual history of the creative writing movement in America, so that today’s variety of available writing modes, pedagogical assumptions, and extant concepts about creative writing can be seen in to have cultural and social lifespans. Put more succinctly: a primary purpose of this class is to help future teachers think about their pedagogical options through the skepticism that an historical understanding can provide.

This course also provides, in light of the historical and analytical study of the ideas attendant to the profession of creative writing, a survey of common problems and issues found in the teaching of creative writing, as well as effective ways to design courses, write syllabi, and deal with common situations found in the creative writing classroom.

            Topical outline:

  1. Historical Overview
    1. Institutional and Cultural Roots of CW Movement
    2. History of Ideas related to CW and CW Pedagogy
  2. Common Pedagogical Concerns, Obsessions, and Professional Habits Relating to Classroom Structure and Activities
    1. Notions of self, agency, subject, intention
      1. Writer as autonomous agent
        1. Writer as transgressor, rebel, heretic
        2. Writer as hero
      2. The Hidden Exogenous – Externals that Make Art
        1. History of the notion of influence
        2. The field of cultural production
        3. Collective proprioception
      3. The Hidden Endogenous – The Lack of Internals
        1. The automaticity of being
        2. The illusion of free will
        3. The sociology of artistic perception
    2.  Socioemotional Considerations and Practices
      1. Authority in the CW Classroom
      2. Notions of Self, Other, group in CW Classroom
        1. Empathy: in classrm & CW culture at large
        2. Argument: in classrm & CW culture at large
      3. Metacognition
  3. Effective Assignments and Syllabi Models
    1. Invention, Revision, Rationales
      1. Invention
      2. Appropriate
      3. Collaboration
      4. Revisions
      5. Writing Rationales
      6. Experiential Assignments
    2. Problems and Issues specific to CW Assessment and Evaluation

Specific student outcomes as a result of course participation:  Students will understand how effectively to teach invention and revision of literary writing in the CW classroom. Students will become skilled in the writing of effective and engaging assignments, assignment rationales, and syllabi. Students will understand the history of common cultural assumptions about both the creation of literature and the teaching of creative writing, allowing them more effectively to deal with common problems in the creative writing classroom.

Format:
In addition to smaller assignments, graduate students will write one syllabus, two Statements of Teaching Philosophy, and a final article-length research paper with the idea that it can serve as a version of a chapter of a dissertation or a version of an eventually publishable paper.



ENG 470 Studies in Children's Literature

Topics in texts for children and adolescents: genres, authors, critical approaches, themes, or historical developments.

Section 01, T at 5:30, Jan Susina

Children’s literature has always involved the combination of images and text.  This course will examine the ways that words and images combine to create compelling narratives for children and young adults.  This course will examine a variety of visual texts including picture books, easy readers, illustrated books, alphabet books, comics, and graphic novels created for young readers.  Using various critical approaches, we will examine how different illustrators and designers select and use sequential art to tell stories.   While this course is intended for graduate students working in the fields of children’s and adolescent literature, it will be applicable to those students interested in visual culture and popular culture.

Tentative Book List:
Perry Nodelman.  Words about Pictures: The Narrative Art of Children’s Picture Books. U of Georgia P.
Nick Sousanis. Unflattening.  Harvard UP.
Chip Kidd’s Go: A Kidd’s Guide to Graphic Design. Workman Publishing.
Heinrich Hoffmann. Struwwelpeter in English Translation. Dover.
Lewis Carroll.  Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass.
Illustrated by John Tenniel. Ed, Hugh Haughton, Penguin.
Beatrix Potter. The Tale of Peter Rabbit. Warne.
Virginia Lee Burton. The Little House. HMH Books for Young Readers.
Margaret Wise Brown. Goodnight Moon. Illustrated by Clement Hurd. Harper Trophy.
Charles M. Schulz. Peanuts: A Golden Celebration. Harper Collins.
Dr. Seuss. The Cat in the Hat.  Random House.
Elsa Holmelund Minarik. Little Bear. Illustrated by Maurice Sendak. Harper Trophy.
Maurice Sendak. Where the Wild Things Are. Harper Trophy.
Ezra Jack Keats. The Snowy Day. Puffin Books.
Faith Ringgold. Tar Beach. Dragonfly Books.
Jon Scieszka. The True Story of the Three Little Pigs. Illustrated by Lane Smith. Puffin Books.
Art Spiegelman & Francoise Mouly, eds. Big Fat Little Little Lit. Puffin Books.
Raina Telgemeier. Sisters. Graphix Scholastic.
Brian Selznick.  The Invention of Hugo Cabret.  Scholastic.
Lynda Barry. One Hundred Demons. Sasquatch Books.



ENG 496 Theory and Research in Rhetoric and Composition Studies

Advanced study of recent theory and research in Rhetoric and Composition Studies.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, Amy Robillard

In rhetoric and composition studies, we recognize the importance of technological literacy, of digital literacy, of visual literacy, and this seminar argues that we must also possess a literacy of abuse. Donald Trump gaslights the country on a daily basis. White supremacy boldly announces its presence at rallies while the president claims that “both sides” acted badly. Misogyny and racism threaten the health and livelihoods of women and people of color in systemic ways that we must be able to recognize and resist. Each of us is manipulated to act against our own interests in ways small and large, from ordering what we don’t really want for lunch to staying in relationships in which our perspectives are not given their due. How does this happen? How might we be better prepared to identify the logic of misogyny while on the job market, for instance? What are the signs of gaslighting? How does an understanding of the rhetorical logic of bullying help us identify it and its multiple effects not just in the schoolyard but in the places we live and work?

As the #metoo movement demonstrates the power of speaking back to persistent, serial sexual abuse in entertainment and politics, and high school students wrest power from tragedy in the wake of one of this country’s deadliest school shootings, we know there are ways to resist. To do so, we must understand how abuse operates rhetorically.

This seminar will take as its subject rhetorics of abuse and manipulation, beginning with an overview of contemporary rhetorical theory and moving through logics of coercive control, misogyny, domination, thought reform and totalism, and cults. Together we will work
to understand how language is used to shut others down, to shame them into silence, to control them and, on the flip side, how language is used to break silences and to break the stories that have ensured those silences.

In addition to the following texts, a number of articles and excerpts will be posted to ReggieNet, including work by Judith Butler, Denise Riley, Sara Ahmed, Kate Abramson, Laurie Penny, and David Graeber. We will also read, in addition to traditional academic texts, a number of personal essays.

Required texts
Sharon Crowley, Toward a Civil Discourse
Robert Jay Lifton, Thought Reform and the Psychology of Totalism
Kate Manne, Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny
Patricia Roberts-Miller, Demagoguery and Democracy
James C. Scott, Domination and the Arts of Resistance
Rebecca Solnit, The Mother of All Questions
Evan Stark, Coercive Control
Alexandra Stein, Terror, Love, and Brainwashing: Attachment in Cults and Totalitarian Systems



ENG 498 Professional Practice: Internship in English

Supervised field experience in English with local, state, national, and international businesses, agencies, institutions (including colleges and universities), and organizations.



ENG 499 Master's Thesis



ENG 500 Independent Study

Directed independent study in an area of English Studies.



ENG 560 Seminar in Literature and Culture

Research in selected areas of literary and/or cultural study framed within the contexts of pedagogy and English Studies.

Section 01, M at 5:30, Chris Breu

This course will explore literary and English studies from three intersecting approaches: materialism, historicism, and textuality. The course will begin by analyzing the shifting frameworks of critical theory in the last thirty years, charting the shift from what has been called the “linguistic turn” or “cultural turn” to the “material turn.” This shift has privileged questions of materiality and material possibility and constraint over notions of social and linguistic construction. We will examine the political and theoretical import of shift attending to the power and limitations of each approach. We will then turn to theorizing specific dimensions of a materialist, historiographical, and textual approach to literary and cultural studies. The course will end with assessing the different approaches we’ve read and thinking through how they can be combined or synthesized.

Probable Texts:
W.J.T. Mitchell and Mark B. N. Hansen, Critical Terms for Media Studies
Fredric Jameson, The Political Unconscious
Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality
Eve Sedgwick, Epistemology of the Closet
Manuel De Landa, A Thousand Years of Nonlinear History
Fred Moten and Stephano Harney, The Undercommons
Jennifer Eagan, A Visit From the Goon Squad
Kazuo Ishiguro, Never Let Me Go.
Essays from a range of different people including: Theodor Adorno, Stacy Alaimo and Susan Hekman, Annie McClanahan, Karl Marx, Quentin Meillassoux, Aníbal Quijano, Immanuel Wallerstein, and many others.



ENG 590 Seminar in Rhetoric and Composition Studies

Research in the configurations of rhetoric and composition studies, with emphasis on English Studies and the post-secondary teaching of writing.

Section 01, W at 5:30, Julie Jung

This course examines relations between the aligned fields of rhetoric and composition through the framework of critical literacy studies. We will begin with Sharon Crowley’s The Methodical Memory, which offers an historicized argument that explains how and why rhetorical invention—or the social construction of knowledge—became yoked to academic writing instruction and pedagogies of correctness. We will then read scholarship that disrupts this reductive rhetoric-writing relation by challenging rhetoric’s Western origin story and complicating its association with only alphabetic writing. In the remainder of the course, we will read book-length arguments that theorize literacies capaciously and critically—as culturally and historically situated human meaning-making practices. Focusing specifically on scholarship that contests problematic linkages among literacy, whiteness, normativity, refinement, and citizenship, our overall purpose will be to examine how rhetoric-composition can be rethought through the use of “critical literacy” as a disruptive third term.

Required Texts (tentatively scheduled to be read in this order):

  • Crowley, Sharon. The Methodical Memory: Invention in Current-Traditional Rhetoric. Southern Illinois UP, 1990.
  • Kynard, Carmen. Vernacular Insurrections: Race, Black Protest, and the New Century in Composition-Literacies Studies. State U of New York P, 2014.
  • Pritchard, Eric Darnell. Fashioning Lives: Black Queers and the Politics of Literacy. Southern Illinois UP, 2016.
  • Guerra, Juan C. Language, Culture, Identity and Citizenship in College Classrooms and Communities. Routledge, 2015.
  • Lindquist, Julie. A Place to Stand: Politics and Persuasion in a Working-Class Bar. Oxford UP, 2002.
  • Flower, Linda. Community Literacy and the Rhetoric of Public Engagement. Southern Illinois UP, 2008.
  • Horner, Bruce, and Karen Kopelson, eds. Reworking English in Rhetoric and Composition: Global Interrogations, Local Interventions. Southern Illinois UP, 2014.
  • We will also read articles and book chapters by scholars including Bev Moss, Malea Powell, Gabriela Raquel Ríos, Jacqueline Jones Royster, Victor Villanueva, Amy Wan, and Morris Young.


ENG 591 Practicum (Internship) in College Teaching

Teaching of lower-division English courses with emphasis upon new techniques; under faculty direction, at Illinois State University or off campus; in conjunction with tutorial meetings. Prerequisite: completion of doctoral course work.



ENG 599 Research and Dissertation

Research involving the gathering of materials and data and the writing of a dissertation.



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Spring 2018

Please note this listing is of courses from a previous semester. Check back closer to your registration date to see descriptions for upcoming courses.



ENG 310 History and Development of the English Language

Development of the English language from the Old English period to the present.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, K. Aaron Smith

English 310 is the advanced course on the history of English. The course reviews the major developments of the English language, viewing many of them as simple straightforward facts. The course, however, complicates those “facts” by investigating further linguistic and sociolinguistic data that allow for alternative explanations/accounts. Thus, the objective of the course is not only for students to learn or review a history of English but also to develop a more critical eye toward English language historiography.


ENG 311 Introduction to Old English Language and Literature

Elements of Old English grammar, with selected readings in Old English literature.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Susan Kim



ENG 341 Introduction to Descriptive Linguistics

Aims and methods of linguistic science. Nature and functions of language: phonology, morphology, syntax, variation.

Section 01, MWF at 9:00, Susan Burt



ENG 343 Cross-Cultural Issues in TESOL

The relationship between language, culture, and cultural awareness in the learning and teaching of English as a Second Language.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Lisya Seloni



ENG 344 TESOL: Theoretical Foundations

Linguistic theories: first and second language acquisition; cognitive, affective, and cultural factors in teaching English as a Second Language.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Lisya Seloni



ENG 347.02 Advanced Creative Writing: Prose

Workshop format for individual projects; related theory.

Section 01, MW at 3:35, Joe Amato



ENG 349 Technical Writing II

Instruction and practice in editing, proposals, and analytical writing; attention given to style manuals, research writing, and (as needed) publication.

Section 01, MW at 3:35, Angela Haas



ENG 351 Hypertext

Workshop using digital technologies to compose comlex, multimodal, Web-based texts for a variety of rhetorical situations.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, Erika Sparby



ENG 355 Forensic Bibliography and Archival Editing

History of print culture from orality to digital text; introduction to principles and practices of bibliographic investigation and scholarly editing.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, Tara Lyons



ENG 358 Topics in Publishing Studies

Topics in specific theories, histories, trends, methodologies, practices, or figures in publishing.

Section 01, M at 5:30, Duriel Harris



ENG 360 Studies in Women's Writing

Studies in and theories of women's writing.

Section 01, MW at 3:35, Cynthia Huff

This course focuses on the diversity of women's autobiographical expression historically, cross-culturally, and generically. We'll interrogate the similarities/differences between types of life writing discourse such as diaries, essays, testimonio, graphic life writing and historical/cultural narrative, and ask how the assumed/implied audience, the historical period, multiple voices, the geographical location, as well as issues of race, class, age, ability, sexual orientation, and relationship affect women's autobiographical acts. We'll question whether the term autobiography fits women's practices, consider if the term life writing/narrative is more appropriate, and discuss what distinctions between autobiography and biography, on one hand, or literature, on the other hand, seem meaningful.

Because life writing extends across the boundaries of English Studies as well as transgresses the boundaries of other disciplines to include art, history, and psychology, for example, it’s ideal for thinking about how and why we read texts and considering teaching strategies. This course will ask how reading a variety of women’s life writing texts helps us learn about ourselves as critical consumers and about others’ lives, and suggest some strategies for how to teach life writing. This course is ideal for anyone who ever wanted to think about how his/her life might be written, to investigate how different women have written their lives, to explore how you might convey the dynamics of a life to anyone who wants to think about how important living a life is.

Because a major component of the course is pedagogical, it fulfills the pedagogy requirement for graduate students. Because of its emphasis on teaching, it is also ideal for undergraduate education majors. It also is an elective for the Women and Gender Studies minor.

This course is interdisciplinary in nature and would benefit rhetoric, writing studies, linguistics, creative writing, and technical communications specialists.



ENG 373 Poetry for Children

Poetry for children and early adolescents, including various categories, elements, and well-known poets in the field.

Section 01, M at 5:30, Karen Coats

From nursery rhymes and cradle songs to young adult SLAM poetry competitions, youth poetry plays a vital role in teaching us the rhythms of our languages, connecting us to other people, and shaping our emotional lives. In this class we will explore how that happens from various angles. We will take a linguistics approach, examining how poetic language mirrors and enhances and yet is fundamentally different from sensory, embodied experience (there is chocolate involved here); a developmental approach, looking at how the luminous communicative musicality of early childhood morphs into the humorously transgressive poetry of middle childhood and culminates in the full-blown protests of young adult poetry; and an aesthetics approach, attempting to figure out what makes a good poem good. We will also spend some time looking at verse novels for various ages, and how poetry and illustration interact in poetic picturebooks.
Books to buy:
Elliott, David, Bull
Alexander, Kwame, Out of Wonder: Poems Celebrating Poets
Smith, Hope Anita, The Way a Door Closes
Grimes, Nikki, Planet Middle School
Singer, Marilyn, Mirror, Mirror: A Book of Reverso Poems
Sidman, Joyce, This is Just to Say: Poems of Apology and Forgiveness
Wolf, Allan, Immersed in Verse: An Informative, Slightly Irreverent, and Totally Tremendous Guide to Living the Poet’s Life
Frost, Helen, Diamond Willow
Janeczko, Paul, Firefly July: A Year of Very Short Poems
Hoberman, Mary Ann, Forget-Me-Nots: Poems to Learn by Heart



ENG 375 Young Adult Literature

Advanced critical examination of literature for young adults with emphasis on trends and research.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Mary Moran

A wide variety of experiences marks the transition from childhood to adulthood through that ever-changing stage known as adolescence.  In this class, we’ll focus on the question of how young people learn to make mature ethical decisions.  Of course, this approach necessitates guidelines about what it means to make “mature ethical decisions.”  Therefore, as background to our analysis of literature, we’ll start by reading two groundbreaking studies of moral development by Lawrence Kohlberg and Carol Gilligan.  Kohlberg proposes that the highest level of morality is the ability to make decisions according to universal principles; Gilligan suggests an alternative model in which moral decision-making must take into account the relationships among particular individuals and the communities in which they live.  We’ll use these ideas to investigate novels from various time periods and subgenres, all written for and about young adults, with protagonists who explore their responsibilities to self, particular others, and community.  Texts will include Laurie Halse Anderson’s Speak, Benjamin Alire Saenz’s Dante and Aristotle Discover the Secrets of the Universe, Philip Pullman’s The Golden Compass, and Randa Abdel-Fattah’s Does My Head Look Big in This?.  Most of our classes will be devoted to discussion, though we will also use class time for writing and for peer workshopping; students should expect to be actively engaged in their learning during each class.  In addition to thoughtful and interactive participation, student responsibilities will include a day of leading discussion and three papers (a 3-4 page paper and an 8-10 page paper for all students and a final paper of 10-12 pages for undergraduates, 20-25 for graduate students).



ENG 385 Life Writing/Narrative in Theory and Practice

Theoretical and practical consideration of interdisciplinary field of life writing/narrative. Textual production and reception, representation, rhetoric, memory, narrative, genre.

Section 01, T at 5:30, Cynthia Huff

   This class combines the theory and practice of life writing/narrative to look at the ways in which life writing/narrative is practiced and how scholars theorize that practice. To do that we’ll consider different genres, such as the diary, the essay, graphic memoir, biography, autobiography, and oral history, and consider, too, how the presentation of life stories by using different media, such as photos and drawing, affects their effect, thus raising questions of material production. For us to establish a vocabulary used by life writing scholars, we’ll read critical texts that discuss key terms in life writing scholarship, such as identity/subjectivity, truth value, agency, autobiographical subject, and autobiographical act, among others, as well as examine the interfaces between the theoretical practices of life writing scholars and those more generally used in English Studies. We’ll also act as life writers, both by writing our own lives and by critiquing how the members of the discourse community created in our class individually and collectively use life narrative to tell their stories. Several of the assigned texts will help us understand the interchange between the theory and practice of life writing/narrative as their authors foreground this. The theme of this course focuses on the family, very broadly conceived, so that the families we’ll read about over the course of the semester are human biological, cross species, and affectively conceived ones, thus allowing us to interrogate what it means to invoke “family” when creating a life writing/narrative text.

This course acts an elective for the Women and Gender Studies minor and, because it is interdisciplinary in nature and deals with both the theory and practice of life writing, it would benefit rhetoric, writing studies, linguistics, creative writing, and technical communications specialists.



ENG 394 TESOL Practicum

Observation, case studies, tutoring, instructional assistance, and some teaching experience in English as a Second Language.

Section 01, W at 1:00, Lisya Seloni



ENG 396 The Writing Seminar

Concentration upon a major writing project and the formulation of an individual Writing Portfolio.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Jeremy Hurley



ENG 398 Professional Practice: Internship in English

Supervised field experience in English with local, state, national, and international businesses, agencies, institutions(including colleges and universities), and organizations.

Section 01, Arrange, Elise Hurley



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ENG 400 Independent Study

Directed independent study in an area of English Studies.

Arrange with instructor.



ENG 409.03 Writing Assessment in High School/Middle School

Improving the quality of writing instruction in middle and high schools.

Section 01, S at 9:00, Bob Broad

Meeting Time: (approximately every other) Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 2:50 p.m.
Please Note Meeting Dates: 1/20, 2/3, 2/17, 3/3, 3/24, 4/7, 4/21, and 5/5
Meeting Place: STV 410 (and the STV 408 computer lab)

Required books:
Farley, Todd. Making the Grades: My Misadventures in the Standardized Testing Industry. Sausalito CA: Polipoint, 2009. (ISBN: 978-0981709154) Approx. cost $13.
Gallagher, Chris W., and Eric D. Turley. Our Better Judgment: Teacher Leadership for Writing Assessment. Urbana, IL: NCTE, 2012. Print. (ISBN: 978-0-8141-3476-4) Approx. cost $32.
Huot, Brian, and Peggy O’Neill, eds. Assessing Writing: A Critical Sourcebook. NCTE/Bedford St. Martin’s: Boston, 2009. Print. (ISBN: 978-0-312-47596-3) Approx. cost: $44 but we can probably get you a FREE copy so don’t buy it yet.
Ravitch, Diane. Reign of Error: The Hoax of the Privatization Movement and the Danger to America's Public Schools. New York: Knopf, 2013. Print. (ISBN: 978-0385350884) Approx. cost: $17 hardcover or $12 electronic.
Wilson, Maja. Rethinking Rubrics. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2006. (ISBN: 978-0325008561) Approx. cost $20.

Recommended books:
Broad, Bob. What We Really Value: Beyond Rubrics in Teaching and Assessing Writing. Logan, UT: Utah State UP, 2003. (ISBN: 978-0874215533) Approx. cost $22.
Eliot, Norbert. On a Scale: A Social History of Writing Assessment in America. New York: Lang, 2005. Hillocks, George. The Testing Trap: How State Writing Assessments Control Learning. New York: Teachers College P, 2002. (ISBN: 978-0807742297) Approx. cost $18.
Huot, Brian. (Re)Articulating Writing Assessment for Teaching and Learning. Logan, UT: Utah State UP, 2002. (ISBN: 978-0-87421-449-9) Approx. cost $22.
Wiggins, Grant. Educative Assessment: Designing Assessments to Inform and Improve Student Performance. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1998. (ISBN: 978-0787908485) Approx. cost $32.
[Please note: This list of required and recommended texts is subject to revision until the start of the semester.]

Description of Course
This course will take as its starting (and ending) point the idea that assessment is, in Grant Wiggins’s term, “educative.” That is, assessment is not only, and not most powerfully, a means to research and document learning. It is most importantly a means to generate, support, and guide learning. Therefore, one of the key criteria by which we should judge any assessment is: “What does this assessment teach our students (and faculty, administrators, the public, etc.)?”

In studying writing assessment, we will therefore explore assessment options with careful attention to what we believe they teach us and our students about writing (and learning, etc.). Each student in this class is expected to identify, refine, develop, and carry out an individual or collaborative research project (textual research and/or empirical research) on some aspect of writing assessment of immediate professional importance and usefulness to herself/ himself and to other key stakeholders (e.g., other teachers, students, parents, administrators, legislators). We will also likely undertake a “communal change project” on a topic of our collaborative choosing.

Some themes and topics we will explore include:
  • Histories of writing assessment
  • Testing vs. “authentic” and “educative” assessment
  • Writing portfolio assessment
  • Responding to vs. grading students’ writing
  • Classroom writing assessment
  • Statewide and/or large-scale writing assessment
  • Computerized writing assessment
Format of Course
Like other classes in the “Teaching Writing in High School and Middle School” (Eng. 409.0X) series, this course is designed specifically for the benefit of teachers of writing in secondary (middle-school and high-school) English classrooms. We will educate ourselves regarding relevant theory and research, and integrate that learning into highly focused and “useable” research projects. In general terms, our activities and projects in and outside of class will include: Reading assigned texts and writing in a response journal (reflective writing-to-learn); class discussions and activities; communal change project; and individual research projects.

Participants in the class will assemble, groom, and present their own course portfolios (by default, electronic) to promote and document their learning. They should finish the course ready to publish their finished research projects on a website, in a sourcebook for teachers of writing, and/or in professional publications such as books and journals for teachers.

Special note on attendance
Please make careful note of the dates of the eight (8) scheduled meetings for this course, and please protect that time zealously and without fail. In a course that meets only eight times, even one absence is unacceptable. In case of a genuine emergency, contact the professor in advance of the expected problem date and make special arrangements.

Please Note Meeting Dates: 1/20, 2/3, 2/17, 3/3, 3/24, 4/7, 4/21, and 5/5


ENG 422 Studies in Shakespeare

Major critical problems in representative plays of Shakespeare.

Section 01, R at 5:30, Tara Lyons

“Shakespeare and Authorship Studies”

This course will examine historical and contemporary theories of authorship and their intersection with Shakespeare Studies. Readings will address social constructions of “the author,” theories of collaborative authorship, methodologies for author attribution, and the ethics of cultural adaptation and appropriation. In addition to reading postmodern theories of authorship responding to Barthes and Foucault, the class will also examine historical conceptions of authors in early modern England. In other words, how did Shakespeare become “Shakespeare” in his own time? To answer this question, we’ll read the books that “made Shakespeare” in the sixteenth and early-seventeenth centuries—that is, his “best-selling” books (Venus and Adonis, Rape of Lucrece, Richard II, Richard III, 1 Henry IV, Romeo and Juliet, and Hamlet). Students will have the opportunity to participate in a field trip to the Newberry Library in Chicago.



ENG 440 Studies in English Linguistics

Advanced study and research in various aspects of the English language.

Section 01, MW at 3:35, K. Aaron Smith

Languages in the US: A Descriptive Linguistic Survey

In this course, we will undertake a descriptive survey of languages spoken in the United States, both historically and contemporaneously. By "descriptive" it is meant that our study of these languages will involve description of their linguistic structure in terms of phonology, morphology and syntax. Our study of the languages will also consider their historical and sociolinguistic status particularly in terms of documented contact phenomena with English, i.e. contact-induced effects/changes on phonology, morphology, syntax. While the list is not yet definitive (as it will depend on my ability to locate good descriptions of the languages), we may study Spanish, Creoles (such as Gullah and Hawaiian), Dutch, Scandinavian, German, Massachusetts, Navajo, Vietnamese, Yupik (Alaska), Portuguese, Chinese and/or others, again depending on availability of appropriate resources. Assessment in the course will be based on the development of a graduate-quality paper at the end of the course on a topic dealing with linguistic diversity. Note that the paper should be approached in a way that augments the student's larger academic and scholarly goals within their field of study. In some cases that may be linguistics, but it certainly may be any other area of English Studies. Thus, the paper could be about the representation of language diversity in children's or other forms of literature. The paper could be about the representation of linguistic diversity in fantasy novels/movies/shows. The paper could be about the rhetorics of linguistic diversity in the US or elsewhere. The paper could be about linguistic diversity in another geopolitical space. The paper could be about linguistic diversity in the composition process, i.e. multilanguage writing, etc. If you have any questions about the kind of paper you might develop before deciding to the take the course, contact me and we can talk about it. My major goal in teaching this course is to delve into linguistic description and use that as a way to connect linguistics to other discourses in English Studies. However minimally, you must be prepared to read and talk about the linguistic structure of Language (phonology, morphology, and syntax).


ENG 467 Technology and English Studies

Critical examination of the impact of digital technology on a selected field within English Studies.

Section 01, R at 5:30, Erika Sparby

An overview of key theories, methods, practices, and pedagogies that inform and are informed by digital rhetorical studies.


ENG 470 Studies in Children's Literature

Topics in texts for children and adolescents; genres, authors, critical approaches, themes, or historical developments.

Section 01, W at 2:00, Mary Moran

We will be exploring connections between YA speculative fiction (mostly fantasy) and feminist ethics, in particular ethics of care. Feminist ethical analysis of emotions, empathy, and relationality has spurred the development of innovative conceptions of morality, autonomy, and identity (among others) that resonate with many of the subjects of speculative fiction for young people. The selection of scholarly reading will include works by Carol Gilligan, Nel Noddings, Margaret Urban Walker, Fiona Robinson, and Virginia Held. The reading list of fiction will include Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials and his just-published (!!!) La Belle Sauvage, some part of Laini Taylor's Daughter of Smoke and Bone trilogy, and works by Madeleine L'Engle and Gene Leun Yang (tying in with Yang’s visit to the campus in March). Students in all fields are welcome, as children’s literature and/or childhood studies can intersect productively with many other concentrations.



ENG 497 Research Methods in Composition Studies

Current reasearch issues and methods in composition studies, with emphasis on experimental, formalistic, and naturalistic designs.

Section 01, T at 5:30, Bob Broad

Description of the course
While Writing Studies is the frame of reference for this research methods course, the questions we tackle and the methods we learn and practice are essential for scholars doing human subjects research in any sub-field of English Studies, including literature, linguistics, theory, and creative writing among others.

When we produce and consume “research,” what are we doing, and why do we do it? What dynamic relations can we trace through the processes we call “research” among the phenomena of: curiosity, questions, problems, inquiry, data, method, rhetoric, theory, knowledge, power, money (e.g., the need to be hired), history, values, ideals, reputation, ambition, desire, fear, desperation, persuasion, and teaching practices?

To help us answer such questions, I have designed this course as an inductive inquiry into the meaning, character, and role of qualitative-empirical research in contemporary U.S. society and specifically in the field of composition and rhetoric. We will study closely those books and articles that participants in the class (and others) identify as particularly powerful examples of (and reflections on) empirical research in English Studies, and we will derive from that collaborative study a useful, productive understanding of what research is and ways we might conduct it. Participants will then channel their new, enhanced understandings of research in our field into research designs and pilot studies that they will carry out during the course.

On the assumption that most of us in English Studies are already familiar with and well-trained in textual research, this course will focus primarily (though not exclusively) on empirical research, particularly on qualitative research, and especially on research with human subjects. Participants are strongly encouraged to arrive on the first day of class with three focused, well-considered, prospective research topics and research questions for the qualitative-empirical pilot study they will conduct during the course.

Format of the course
We will read books and articles of and about empirical research in Writing Studies. We will write informally and formally, and share our readings, writings, resources, questions, and ideas during class meetings. In addition to establishing a solid basis of knowledge regarding a range of research methods and methodologies, participants will design and pilot research studies of their own. These pilot studies should be closely linked to students’ plans for internships, theses, dissertations, articles, books, and other professional opportunities and responsibilities.



ENG 498 Professional Practice: Internship in English

Supervised field experience in English with local, state, national, and international businesses, agencies, institutions (including colleges and universities), and organizations.

Section 01, arrange, Elise Hurley



ENG 499 Master's Thesis

Consult with department.



ENG 500 Independent Study

Directed independent study in an area of English Studies.

Arrange with instructor.



ENG 510 Seminar in English Studies Pedagogy

Research and study of pedagogical theory in post-secondary English Studies with emphasis on developing self-reflexive pedagogy.

Section 01, TR at 11:00, Katherine Ellison

What does it mean to teach right now in the year 2018? What are the current social, political, economic, and historical contexts of your entrance into the profession of teaching, whether that is and will be in a college classroom or in a space for training and mentoring outside of higher education? This pedagogy seminar will take into consideration the fact that, as educators, we are always teaching: through public intellectualism, on social media, at family gatherings, and during interactions with others in our daily lives. What are the specific stakes of teaching in classrooms and in the public eye when there are Professor Watchlists? When we must receive Active Shooter Training? When some of our students are frightened to come to campus, or to walk through the parking garage at night, or to share their unique experiences because they might face emboldened discrimination, threat, and sexual assault? 

We will balance the practical – what are specific strategies for leading difficult discussions, how do we teach how to give and receive critique, how do we design responsible syllabi and assignment prompts – with theoretical readings across a range of pedagogical issues and disciplines. I will introduce you to the assessment movement, the good and the bad. You will develop your teaching philosophies and your confidence managing the day-to-day operations of education (how is higher education structured? How do you design an hour and fifteen minutes of learning? How do you give a lecture or make small group work meaningful? What are your legal rights as an educator? What are your honest expectations of yourself and your students?). You will also think more deeply about our ethical responsibilities as educators in times of collective and personal trauma and how our theoretical training helps us (and doesn’t). We will go over strategies for protecting what we most value at the individual and institutional levels: the life of the mind, intellectual freedom, equal rights and access to education, the international circulation of ideas.

The course will be guided by good conversation and reading, but it will also be structured around a series of real-time scenarios, challenges, and case studies. I will surprise you with a situation you must handle spontaneously, at that moment. Having just read Primo Levi’s Survival in Auschwitz and Carl Friedman’s Nightfather with your students, for example, what exactly do you do when a student writes a paper stating that the Holocaust did not happen? What do you say when a student proclaims strongly that the citizens of Hiroshima needed to die to save American lives after reading Masuji Ibuse’s account of the atomic bombing?

Readings: Levi’s Survival in Auschwitz, Friedman’s Nightfather, Hersey’s Hiroshima, Ibuse’s Black Rain, and numerous articles and short works provided as PDFs.



ENG 590 Seminar in Rhetoric and Composition Studies

Research in the configurations of rhetoric and composition studies, with emphasis on English Studies and the post-secondary teaching of writing.

Section 01, W at 5:30, Joyce Walker



ENG 591 Practicum (Internship) in College Teaching

Teaching of lower-division English courses with emphasis upon new techniques; under faculty direction, at Illinois State University or off campus; in conjuction with tutorial meetings.

Consult with department.



ENG 599 Doctoral Research

Research involving the gathering of materials and data and the writing of a dissertation.

Consult with department.



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