2018 Undergraduate Course Offerings

For the most current schedule information, please visit the University's Course Finder.

Summer 2018

ENG 101 Composition as Critical Inquiry

Rhetorical approach to writing, taught through extensive collaborative drafting, revising, and editing. Emphasis on critical reading and analysis. Computer-assisted. Not for credit major/minor. May not be taken under the CT/NC option.

Section 01, online, 8 weeks beginning 5/21, Bryanna Tidmarsh



ENG 110 English Literature and Its Contexts

A historical study of the main movements in English literature. Readings of entire works representative of the movements.

Section 01, online, 4 weeks beginning 5/21, Carol Lind

This will be a completely online course in which we will do our work utilizing screencast lectures, discussion groups, and various ReggieNet tools. Because we will be covering roughly fifteen-hundred years of English literature in four weeks, successful students will be expected to make this their four-week full-time job in order to rigorously complete the various course requirements: viewing lectures, reading the material, completing assessments, interacting with their fellow classmates and, most importantly, thinking about the connections and contextual influences between and upon the works we are studying.


IDS 121.19 Texts and Contexts: Literary Studies

Interdisciplinary writing-intensive course focusing on significant humanities texts in relationship to their historical and cultural contexts.

Section 01, online, 6 weeks beginning 5/21, Gabriel Gudding



ENG 124 Film Style and Literature

An introduction to the analysis of films and their literary components through an application of specialized terms and concepts.

Section 01, online, 4 weeks beginning 5/21, William McBride



ENG 125 Literary Narrative

Critical reading and analysis of a variety of literary narratives that reflect on human experience.

Section 01, online, 4 weeks beginning 5/21, Shelby Ragan



ENG 128 Gender in the Humanities

Examination of gender roles, norms, and stereotypes from a broad range of perspectives within humanities across centuries and cultures.

Section 01, online, 4 weeks beginning 5/21, Kass Fleisher

Section 02, online, 4 weeks beginning 6/18, Angela Haas

This section of ENG 128 focuses on studying the lives of women in transnational contexts by critically engaging with texts, presentations, websites, and videos about women's embodied, lived experiences. Specifically, we will examine:

  • theories and histories of feminism, women's rights, women's liberation, and women's studies
  • representations of women and the visible constructions of gender in popular and independent media
  • local and global social categories, classifications, and structural inequalities
  • colonization, immigration, migrations, and displacements of women
  • women's bodies, health, and sexualities
  • violence against women
  • women's homes and work
  • women, crime, and criminalization
  • women & the military, war, and peace
  • women & the environment
  • women's activism.


ENG 143 Unity and Diversity in Language

Study of the structure of language (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics) as it reflects cognition, social relations, cultural conventions, and seech communities.

Section 01, MTWR at 1:00, 4 weeks starting 5/21, Cristina Sanchez-Martin



ENG 145 Writing in the Academic Disciplines (Sections 01-03)

Introduction to research-based writing for multiple academic audiences. Computer-assisted.

Section 01, online, 8 weeks beginning 5/21, Jeremy Hurley

Students in ENG 145 will study the relationship between the conventions that govern writing in various broadly defined disciplinary groups; they will learn to recognize distinctions and affinities between groups of disciplines and they will learn to analyze discourse conventions and use that knowledge in their writing. Building on both their existing knowledge of writing situations and research into specific writing situations and tasks, they will develop techniques for writing flexibly and effectively for different audiences, forums, and purposes. Through research and practice in a range of writing genres and situations, they will develop their ability to address the discursive conventions of genres in their discipline. In short, the focus of this course is to have students investigate and produce forms of writing which will be necessary within their expected fields.

Students in this course will be required to complete two major writing-intensive projects that will show their understanding of various genres. Students will also create genre reports, reflect on their own writing process, review the work of their colleagues, engage in thoughtful and lively online discussion, and complete a variety of weekly assignments.

Section 02, online, 4 weeks beginning 5/21, Britni Williams

Section 03, online, 4 weeks beginning 6/18, Shannon Harman



ENG 206 Cultural Expressional in Social Contexts: Women of Asia, Latin America and Africa

Interdisciplinary study of carieties of women's cultural expressions within distinct soical contexts including camparative emphasis on fidderent regions of concern.

Section 01, online, 4 weeks, beginning 6/18, Rebecca Saunders



ENG 217 Studies in Romanticism

Studies of texts from the Romantic period.

Section 01, study abroad, beginning 5/21, Brian Rejack.



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ENG 249 Technical and Professional Writing I

Introduction to technical and professional writing. Includes study of manuals, reports, proposals, audience analysis, formatting, and style.

Section 01, online, 8 weeks beginning 5/21, Erika Sparby

Section 02, online, 4 weeks beginning 5/21, Mijan Rahman



ENG 341 Introduction to Descriptive Linguistics

Aims and methods of linguistic science. Nature and functions of language: phonology, morphology, syntax, variation.

Section 01, MTWR at 11:00, 4 weeks beginning 6/18, K. Aaron Smith



ENG 358 Topics in Publishing Studies

Topics in specific theories, histories, trends, methodologies, practices, or figures in publishing.

Section 01, study abroad, beginning 5/21, Brian Rejack



ENG 375 Young Adult Literature

Advances critical examination of literature for young adults with emphasis on trends and research.

Section 01, online, 4 weeks beginning 5/21, Karen Coats

Young adult literature is a vibrant, expanding genre that reflects many of the concerns of growing up and creating and claiming a personal identity in a highly mediated, ethically fragmented culture. At the same time, most of the books are compulsively readable and entertaining, putting a good story above all else. This fully online, asynchronous class will consist of four week-long modules, (from May 21-June 15) that focus on a set of ideas that the texts under consideration engage with in different ways. Each module requires the reading of two or three young adult novels and one critical article, and then taking reading quizzes, participating in graded online discussion groups, and completing a section of the “rolling final.” In addition, you will be asked to complete a project related to a YA genre of your choice, which will need to be submitted by July 1st. The entire course will be posted on ReggieNet by May 1st, so you can work ahead for everything except the weekly discussions and rolling final questions. (The books for week 2 are quite long, and also emotionally challenging, so you will want to read them in advance.)
Week 1:
The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-time Indian, by Sherman Alexie
Anya’s Ghost, by Vera Brosgol
This Side of Home, by Renee Watson
Week 2:
Picture Us in the Light, by Kelly Loy Gilbert
Revolution, by Jennifer Donnelly
Week 3:
Feed, by M. T. Anderson
Glitter, by Aprilynne Pike
Shatter, by Aprilynne Pike
Week 4:
Students will be asked to read two or three books of their choice from a list focused on a particular genre. (Choices include Comedy/Fantasy/Realism/Horror/Historical Fiction/Dystopia/Films and TV/Postmodern fiction) For each book (or film), you will respond to a set of questions. Additionally, you will participate in a discussion group for that genre. There will be no rolling final questions for this week. Instead, your final project will be based on these books, but will not be due until July 1st. You will have several choices for the format of your final project; more details on the requirements for the final project will be included when the class is posted.



ENG 398 Professional Practice: Internship in English

Supervised field experience in English with local, state, national, and international businesses, agencies, institutions (including colleges and universities), and organizations.

Section 01, arrange, Elise Hurley



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Fall 2018

Please note this listing is of courses from a previous semester. Check back closer to your registration date to see descriptions for upcoming courses.



ENG 100 Introduction to English Studies

Critical reading and writing in English Studies.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, Jeremy Hurley

Section 02, MW at 11:00, Paul Ugor

This is an introductory course to literary and cultural studies. In the course, students will develop the ability to interpret, analyze, evaluate, and respond to ideas about literature and other cultural texts. The focus will be to demonstrate the ways in which people create worlds through language and how these imaginative worlds enable us to experience and identify with other forms of human experience. Students will explore the nature, structure, and form of different genres including fiction, drama, poetry, and film. In general, we will explore the dimensions of the human intellect and imagination and develop an informed appreciation of the various modes of creative expression. Students will learn how people have come to understand and express artistic/ aesthetic, moral, and philosophical dimensions of the human condition through narratives

Section 03, TR at 11:00, Kirstin Zona

Section 04, MW at 2:00, Paul Ugor

This is an introductory course to literary and cultural studies. In the course, students will develop the ability to interpret, analyze, evaluate, and respond to ideas about literature and other cultural texts. The focus will be to demonstrate the ways in which people create worlds through language and how these imaginative worlds enable us to experience and identify with other forms of human experience. Students will explore the nature, structure, and form of different genres including fiction, drama, poetry, and film. In general, we will explore the dimensions of the human intellect and imagination and develop an informed appreciation of the various modes of creative expression. Students will learn how people have come to understand and express artistic/ aesthetic, moral, and philosophical dimensions of the human condition through narratives

Section 05, TR at 2:00, Kass Fleisher

Section 06, MW at 3:35, Joe Amato

This course is structured around two basic questions: (1) Why are you in college? and (2) Why do you want to be an English major? I’m going to ask you to provide a tentative answer to the first question at the beginning of the course, with the presumption that by the end of the course your sense of why you’re in college, hence why you’re an English major, will have changed somewhat as a result of our readings and discussion. Naturally this will require that we have a closer look at the history both of higher ed in the US and of the English major itself, which requires some understanding, for instance, of the history of the English language. The format of the course will be somewhat open, as I’m planning to assign (probably online) readings based in part on what we learn from our weekly discussions—on the fly, as it were. I expect everyone to do the work—reading, writing, discussion. In doing the work of this course, you’ll be doing what all English majors do, regardless of your particular track (whether English, Creative Writing, Publishing, or Teacher Ed): exploring and refining your own literacy practices. To the extent that this course will unfold at a particular moment in postsecondary time, our work together will likely be shaped by specific social, institutional, and historical imperatives. And so this course will present ample opportunities for us to consider our responsibilities to one another as public beings with private lives.


ENG 101 Composition as Critical Inquiry (Sections 01-65)

Rhetorical approach to writing, taught through extensive collaborative drafting, revising, and editing. Emphasis on critical reading and analysis. Computer-assisted. Not for credit major/minor. May not be taken under the CT/NC option.



ENG 101.10 Composition as Critical Inquiry (Sections 01-36)

Rhetorical approach to writing, taught through extensive collaborative drafting, revising, and editing. Emphasis on critical reading and analysis. Computer-assisted. Not for credit major/minor. May not be taken under the CT/NC option.



ENG 102 Introduction to English Studies Proseminar

A structured proseminar designed to introduce students to the complex intellectual and professional aspects of the degree in English Studies.

Section 01, TR at 1:00, 8 weeks, Mark Vegter

Section 02, TR at 1:00, 8 weeks, Alan Lin

Section 03, M at 4:00, Mark Vegter

Section 04, W at 12:00, Mark Vegter



ENG 110 English Literature and Its Contexts

A historical study of the main movements in English literature. Readings of entire works representative of the movements.

Section 01, TR at 11:00, Tara Lyons

Section 02, MW at 3:35, TBD



IDS 121.19 Texts and Contexts: Literary Studies

Interdisciplinary writing-intensive course focusing on significant humanities texts in relationship to their historical and cultural contexts.

Section 01, TR at 9:35, TBD

Section 02, MW at 11:00, TBD

Section 03, TR at 11:00, Gabriel Gudding

The texts: Study of fiction and film of the last 150 years that touches upon notions of the alien.
The contexts: Study of various philosophical and scientific texts of the last 700 years that examine the ways we have conceived of both human and nonhuman life as an alien reality within the cosmos.
The course will at its beginning place special emphasis on the ways early and contemporary writers of “weird tales” and speculative fiction have conceived of the alien on Earth and the earthly city as alien.  The literary authors we’ll investigate will range, in brief selection to novel-length work, from Dante, Milton, Mary Shelley, Bram Stoker, Octavia Butler, HP Lovecraft, Aimé Césaire, Ambrose Bierce, Virginia Woolf, William Burroughs, Italo Calvino, Peter Waterhouse, et al. Films will include The Thing from Another World, of 1951, the amazing film Forbidden Planet, of 1956, and Ridley Scott’s recent Prometheus, of 2012.
To provide context and help us make connections, we’ll read, mostly always in brief selection, philosophical and scientific texts that historically situate various conceptions of life as a common travail, a collaborative struggle, and an alien and frightening experience. These texts will range from brief essays and short treatises on theology, philosophy, natural science, cosmology, political science, and the idea of the alien by St. Augustine, Giordano Bruno, Kant, William Herschel, Audre Lorde, Emerson, Martin Heidegger, among several others.

The class will examine the nature of hatred and fear of the other, racism, speciesism, nihilism, existential dread, the horror of infection and invasion, the fear of death and extinction, and the nature of the beautiful and the sublime. Students may realize that we are all, all of us, already astronauts.

Section 04, TR at 2:00, TBD



ENG 124 Film Style and Literature

An introduction to the analysis of films and their literary components through an application of specialized terms and concepts.

Section 01, online, William McBride



ENG 125 Literary Narrative

Critical reading and analysis of a variety of literary narratives that reflect on human experience.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, TBD

Section 02, TR at 11:00, TBD

Section 03, TR at 9:35, TBD

Section 04, MW at 12:35, TBD

Section 05, TR at 12:35, Kirstin Zona

Section 06, TR at 2:00, TBD

Section 07, TR at 5:00, TBD



ENG 128 Gender in the Humanities

Examination of gender roles, norms, and stereotypes from a broad range of perspectives within humanities across centuries and cultures.

Section 01, TR at 9:35, TBD

Section 02, MW at 11:00, TBD

Section 03, MW at 12:35, TBD

Section 04, TR at 2:00, TBD

Section 05, TR at 11:00, TBD



ENG 130 Survey of American Literature

A historical study of the main movements in American literature. Readings of entire works representative of the movements.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Jeremy Hurley

Section 02, MW at 2:00, Jeremy Hurley

Section 03, TR at 2:00, TBD



ENG 143 Unity and Diversity in Language

Study of the structure of language (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics) as it reflects cognition, social relations, cultural conventions, and speech communities.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, TBD

Section 02, MW at 11:00, TBD

Section 03, TR at 2:00, TBD



ENG 145 Writing in the Academic Disciplines (Sections 01-12)

Introduction to research-based writing for multiple academic audiences. Computer-assisted.



ENG 145.13 Writing in the Academic Disciplines (Sections 01-10)

Introduction to research-based writing for multiple academic audiences. Computer-assisted.



ENG 150 World Literature to 14th Century

Readings in ancient and medieval literature, including Dante.

Section 01, Lecture, online, Rebecca Saunders

Section 02, Discussion, M at 11:00, Rebecca Saunders

Section 03, Discussion, W at 11:00, Rebecca Saunders

Section 04, Discussion, M at 3:35, Rebecca Saunders



ENG 160 Introduction to Studies in Women's Writing

Readings in a variety of genres and historical periods.

Section 01, MW at 12:35, TBD



ENG 165 Introduction to African-American Literature and Culture

Selected topics in African-American literature and culture.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, TBD



ENG 170 Foundations in Literature for Children

Introduction to genres of children’s literature, including mythologies, fairy tales, picture books, poetry, and historical, multicultural, and current prose.

As the first course in the children's literature sequence at Illinois State University, ENG 170, Foundations in Literature for Children, is designed to serve as a general introduction to literature for those students studying children's literature. The course covers K-8th grade literature. The primary goal of the course is for students to learn to read literature using children's literature as texts.

The course focuses on children's texts for pre-readers and young readers, including picture books, chapters books, series books, novels, poetry and nursery rhymes, folklore, mythologies, information books and children's films at the K-8th grade level. Texts covered in the class include both canonical and noncanonical texts, recognized and recent children's texts, with attention to classics and multicultural texts, both historical and contemporary. Students in the class learn a range of conceptual materials as they are exposed to this wide variety of children's texts, including how to analyze genre, narrative and poetic form, ideology and issues of social construction, and introductory literary concepts.

Individual instructors order different texts for the section they are assigned to teach. Students enrolling in English 170 will generally be asked to purchase and read approximately 10-15 children's books for the course. While assessments may vary from section to section of English 170, they will include written papers, oral participation, quizzes, and examinations.

Section 01, MWF at 8:00, TBD

Section 02, TR at 8:00, TBD

Section 03, TR at 9:35, TBD

Section 04, MWF at 1:00, TBD

Section 05, MWF at 2:00, TBD

Section 06, MW at 5:00, TBD

Section 07, TR at 5:00, TBD



ENG 183 Rhetoric as Civic Literacy

Section 01, TR at 12:35, TBA

Section 02, MW at 12:35, TBA



ENG 194 Introduction to English Education

This course introduces current scholarship in the field of English Education, including learning theory, teacher research, culturally responsive teaching, and professional practice.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, Maggie Morris Davis

Section 02, TR at 3:35, Danielle Lillge



ENG 218 Studies in the Victorian Period

Studies of texts from the 19th century.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Cynthia Huff



ENG 222 Studies in Shakespeare

Selected readings with emphasis on the relationship between the author, the text, and the larger culture.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Tara Lyons



ENG 227 Introduction to Creative Writing

Opportunity for creative writing of various kinds, such as poetry, fiction, and nonfiction.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, TBD

Section 02, TR at 11:00, TBD

Section 03, TR at 12:35, TBD

Section 04, TR at 2:00, TBD

Section 05, MW at 3:35, TBD



ENG 229 Introduction to Literary Genres

Formal and historical study of literary genres - poetry, drama, prose narrative - as structures of knowledge.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Joe Amato

Section 02, MW at 3:35, TBD



ENG 236 American Literature: 1945-Present

Present-day trends in American literature.

Section 01, MW at 3:35, Chris Breu

This course will introduce students to a diverse array of literature produced within the United States since the end of World War II. Because this period is a particularly rich one, characterized by literary experimentation, the entry into the fictional mainstream of writers of color, and a vital and varied popular culture, the course will work to touch on each of these developments, particularly as they overlap. The course will also engage theoretical debates as to how the literature of this period should be defined. We will examine the terms modernism, postmodernism, postpostmodernism, capitalist realism, and the literature of materiality as different ways of describing literary and cultural production in the period. The writers studied will probably include Joan Didion, Amiri Baraka, Thomas Pynchon, Colson Whitehead, Dodie Bellamy, and David Foster Wallace. There will also be a set of theoretical readings accompanying the texts. 


ENG 241 Growth and Structure of the English Language

An introduction to the history of English designed to help students understand language change and the emergence of contemporary English.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, Susan Kim & K Aaron Smith



ENG 243 The Grammatical Structure of English

Linguistic description of present day American English, focusing on morphology and syntax.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Mahide Demirci

Section 02, TR at 11:00, K Aaron Smith



ENG 246 Advanced Composition

Extensive writing of essays developed in greater depth and sophistication in subject matter than those written in previous writing courses. Computer-assisted.

Section 01, TR at 11:00, TBA

Section 02, TR at 2:00, Robillard



ENG 247.01 Intermediate Creative Writing: Poetry

Workshop in the genre, with critical examination of its conventions.

Section 01, MW at 3:35, Duriel Harris



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ENG 247.03 Intermediate Creative Writing: Non-Fiction

Workshop in the genre, with critical examination of its conventions.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, Kass Fleisher



ENG 249 Technical and Professional Writing I

Introduction to technical and professional writing. Includes study of manuals, reports, proposals, audience analysis, formatting, and style.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, TBA

Section 02, MW at 11:00, TBA

Section 03, MW at 2:00, TBD

Section 04, TR at 9:35, TBA

Section 05, TR at 11:00, TBA

Section 06, TR at 2:00, TBD



ENG 250 Literature of the Bible I

Major ideas and literary forms of the Hebrew Bible/Christian Old Testament.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Jan Neuleib

The literature of the Bible divides into many different genres across many centuries. In this course, we will investigate the ways that the genres vary and the ways that understanding the rhetorical position of each text helps to enhance these stories, histories, poetry, and songs. The range of literature in the Old Testament or Hebrew Scriptures is wide and complex. We will read these texts in the forms and the manners intended and indicated by the genres. We will also look at the ways that these various pieces of literature have influenced storytelling and lyrical presentation throughout the history of literature. We will look also at the representations in current literature that owe much to these earlier works, often without specific references in the revised versions of the stories and lyrics. Be prepared to enjoy the literature and history, but be prepared to be a bit shocked as well. In case you have not read many of them, you will find that some of these stories are definitely not PG rated. The laws, rules, and punishments can be appalling.


ENG 254 Introduction to Professional Publishing

Study and practice of editorial, production, printing, and marketing processes involved with producing a book or journal.

Section 01, T at 1:00, Steve Halle



IDS 254 Religions and Cultures

A critical examination of diverse religious discourses and literacies and how they construct and reflect identity based on cultural differences.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, Jan Neuleib

Religion serves various purposes in cultures and in human lives. Individuals and cultures experiences religious impulses and practices differently. We will operate from four theoretical frames, noting how they work in individuals and cultures. The four are roughly equivalent to high church, middle church, low church, and no church, but there are many variations on these patterns, both within and across cultures. Your task for the course will be to consider thoughtfully where you and your culture fall within these four frames, or to create your own frame from which to see the issues. I will use the word spirituality to talk about individual perspectives on religion and the word community to talk about cultural responses to religion.


ENG 255 Modern Global Literature: 1800-Present

Comparative study of significant texts of modern global literature.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, TBD



ENG 260 History of Literature by Women

A historical overview of writing by women.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Kass Fleisher



ENG 261 Women's Literature in a Global Context

Literature by women of diverse ethnicities tom examine varieties of texts and their cultural construction.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Cynthia Huff

Section 02, MW at 3:35, Cynthia Huff



ENG 267 Foundations of U.S. Latino/a Literatures and Cultures

Concepts, themes, genre conventions, and major historical events and figures significant in U.S. Latino/a literatures and cultures.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Alejandro Enriquez

Foundations of U.S. Latino Literatures and Cultures surveys five centuries of an American literary tradition and includes work from Chicano, Puerto Rican, Cuban American, Dominican American and other cultural traditions that draw on the literary and cultural history of both the US and Latin America. We will begin with Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca (c. 1590-1560), whose famous Relación (Account) of his shipwreck and travels across North America is considered the first example of Latino literature in the territory that was to later become the United States. Following an overview of the historical development of what would become a Latino presence in the US, we will read a variety of contemporary stories and poems, including the work of Sandra Cisneros, the Mexican-American, Chicago-born author of The House on Mango Street (1995); Junot Díaz (b. 1968), the US-based Dominican author of Drown (1996); and many others reflective of the diversity of US Latino experiences. The term U.S. Latino, geographically connected to the United States, is culturally connected Spain’s former colonies in the Americas: South and Central America, the Caribbean, and Mexico; Latino literature is inclusive of writers who have immigrated to the US as well as writers born in the US of Latino heritage. And while all the readings and discussions for this class will be conducted entirely in English, some texts, particularly at the beginning of the semester (such as Cabeza de Vaca’s Relación), will be read in English-translation from the Spanish. At the same time, while some more contemporary writers include Spanish-language expressions in their English-language texts, knowledge of the Spanish language is welcomed but not required.



ENG 271 Literature for Young Children

Analysis of works written for children ages 5 to 9, including multicultural picture books, fairy tales, poetry, and chapter books.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, TBD

Section 02, MW at 3:35, TBD



ENG 272 Literature for Middle Grades

Analysis of works written for children ages 9 to 13, including multicultural novels and information books, children's media, and culture.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, TBD

Section 02, TR at 11:00, Jan Susina

This course will examine works written for children aged nine-to- thirteen, including multicultural novels, poetry, graphic novels, information books, children’s media and culture.

Required Texts:
Mark Twain. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Penguin Classics.
Frances Hodgson Burnett. A Little Princess. Penguin Classics.
Gail Carson Levine. Ella Enchanted. TrophyNewbery.
Rick Riordan. The Lightning Thief.  Disney/Hyperion.
Madeleine L’Engle. A Wrinkle in Time. Farrar Straus and Giroux.
Russell Freedman. Lincoln: A Photobiography. Houghton Mifflin.
Christopher Paul Curtis. Bud, Not Buddy. Yearling.
Jacqueline Woodson. Brown Girl Dreaming. Puffin Books
Blue Balliett. Chasing Vermeer. Scholastic.
Brian Selznick.  The Invention of Hugo Cabret. Scholastic.
E.B. White. Charlotte’s Web. HarperCollins.
Louise Fitzhugh. Harriet the Spy.  Yearling.
Jeff Kinney. Diary of a Wimpy Kid. Amulet Books.

Section 03, TR at 2:00, TBD



ENG 283 Rhetorical Theory and Applications

Critical and analytical examination of the nature and historical development of rhetorical theory and its applications to contemporary discourse.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, Angela Haas

Section 02, TR at 12:35, Erika Sparby

This course will introduce you to the field of rhetoric, specifically to its classical origins and its contemporary applications, particularly in digital communication. Proficiency and knowledge of classical and digital rhetoric can help you get a job, negotiate relationships, perform your civic duties, and can generally help you choose the best course of action in a given situation. Rhetorical study, however, has benefits beyond the pragmatic ones listed above. As rhetors (and we are all rhetors in some form or fashion), we use language and other modes of communication; as audiences (again, we are all audiences in some way or another), language and other modes of communication use us. Thus, we will also study rhetoric in terms of the ideological work it does, uncovering the ways in which ideological values circulating in everyday public discourses persuade us to construct, conform, and/or resist specific (and sometimes competing) versions of reality.



ENG 287 Independent Study

Section 01, ARR



ENG 296 The Teaching of Literature

Examines current scholarship in the teaching of literature at the secondary level; integrates theories of teaching literature with teaching practice. Includes Clinical Experiences: 10 hours, Type 1-5 and 9.

Section 01, TR at 11:00, Danielle Lillge



ENG 297 The Teaching of Writing

Examines current scholarship in the teaching of writing at the secondary level; integrates theories of teaching writing with teaching practice. Includes Clinical Experiences: 15 hours, Type 1-5 and 9.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Sarah Hochstetler

Section 02, MW at 2:00, Sarah Hochstetler



ENG 299 Independent Honors Study

Section 01, Arrange



ENG 300 Senior Seminar

Capstone course for English majors, synthesizing the main dimensions of English studies. Requires senior project and portfolio.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Ricardo Cruz

Section 02, MW at 3:35, Ricardo Cruz

Section 03, TR at 2:00, Susan Kalter



ENG 321 Studies in Drama

Study of the movements, figures, historical periods, or contexts of drama.

Section 01, W at 5:30, William McBride



ENG 341 Introduction To Descriptive Linguistics

Aims and methods of linguistic science. Nature and functions of language: phonology, morphology, syntax, variation.

Section 02, MWF at 11:00, Susan Burt



ENG 345 TESOL: Methods and Materials

Methodologies and techniques for teaching English as a Second Language; evaluation of materials for various levels and instructional goals. Includes Clincical Experiences.

Section 01, W at 5:00, Lisya Seloni



ENG 346 Assessment and Testing in ESL

Assessing oral and written proficiency in English as a Second Language.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, Mahide Demirci



ENG 347.01 Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry

Workshop format for individual projects; related theory.

Section 01, M at 5:30, Duriel Harris

Attending to poetry as the art of language (in prose and verse) and poetics as necessary interrogations surrounding making, this studio/workshop/seminar will function as a dynamic space for interrogation, discovery, and experimentation in the generation and presentation of new work. Over the course of the term we will take up “withness” as a primary mode of making—engaging with works that inspire us to try on ekphrasis, transmedia writing, dramatic scenes, polyvocal works, performance, and paratextual prose among other things. Experimentation with making via commonly accessible technologies (i.e. social media) and open source software (i.e. audio and video editing) is encouraged but not required. Android smartphones/tablets and MAC iPhones/iPads welcome.

Please note:
We'll be experimenting outside of the usual poetry "comfort zone" medium of print but will be working largely in print, so print-loving poets need not be wary.



ENG 349 Technical Writing II

Instruction and practice in editing, proposals, and analytical writing; attention given to style manuals, research writing, and (as needed) publication. Computer assisted.

Section 01, TR at 11:00, Erika Sparby

This is an advanced course designed to introduce you to the theories, issues, and practices of professional and technical communication. This course is designed with two primary student audiences in mind—those of you who plan to enter technical fields, and those of you who plan to work in a variety of writing and communication fields—both of which will require you to write and design documents on a regular basis and for a variety of contexts. As such, this course is grounded in rhetorical principles (such as purpose, audience, arrangement, style, ethics, etc.) and asks you to apply them to professional and technical communication contexts and genres. It is also based in a cultural studies approach that asks writers to make thoughtful considerations of both local and global audiences with a wide range of backgrounds, experiences, and needs. Projects include basic memos and reports, as well as performing risk assessments and making decisions, developing policies, and designing effective documents.

Section 02, MW at 12:35, TBD



ENG 350 Visible Rhetoric

Document design as a rhetorical activity and the application of theories of visible rhetoric to document production.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Elise Hurley



ENG 355 Forensic Bibliography and Archival Editing

History of print culture from orality to digital text; introduction to principles and practices of bibliographic ivestigation and scholarly editing.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, Tara Lyons



ENG 357 Studies in Creative Writing

Survey of theories creative writers explicitly and implicitly employ and consider. Includes editing, analysis, and writing of creative and theoretical texts.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, Gabriel Gudding

This is a reading-intensive survey course in the history and sociology of the institutions, theories, practices, and material forces that give rise to literary production. By the end of this course, students will better understand how current and past influential theories, as well as cultural and economic conditions affect writers, readers, editors and the texts these actors produce and police. We will examine the coincidental and arbitrary (uncontrollable, non-willed) nature of valuation and taste, and the variety of ways aesthetic evaluation and taste are policed – in light of rigorous studies (not mere theoretical assertion) about the intermeshing of material and cultural capital, neurology, social psychology, ideology and practice in the genesis and policing of creative texts. Students will come to comprehend the nature of professional dialogue in publishing and creative writing, and the wide range of possible ideas and conditions underlying the production of literary texts now and in the past.

I designed this course especially to benefit creative writers, students of literature, students of publishing, and anyone else interested in artistic production. As far as I can tell, this course is unusual; I have not seen a course like it in the curricula of other universities.

The course will have three major foci (see below for course bibliography, a finer schematic of the course plan, and its calendar):

1). Major statements of literary and critical theory relevant to literary production.

2). Economic and Intellectual History. Literary intellectual history, the impact of global economic historical forces on literary production in Europe and the Americas from the 1790s to the present.

3). Sociology & Social Psychology (including neurology & findings in collective cognition and perception). Sociology of art, taste, and artistic production. Specific attention will be paid to understanding the structure and material conditions underlying the problem of the “ideology of charismatic creativity."



ENG 365 Movements and Periods in African-American Literature and Culture

Advanced critical study of major movements and periods in African-American literature.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, Chris De Santis



ENG 374 Storytelling

The art of storytelling based on knowledge of folklore heritage with experiences in oral transmission of literature in a variety of settings.

Section 01, R at 5:30, Karen Coats

Stories and storytelling are foundational to human experience. We tell stories to preserve our individual and cultural memories, share experience, and project possible futures. Our first way of understanding the world is through story, and we continue to use story to explain the world to ourselves, to explain ourselves to others, and to explain ourselves to ourselves. In this class, we will approach storytelling from multiple angles: from theories of why we tell stories and why and how we respond to them, to examinations of how stories work in literature and everyday life, and finally, to techniques of how we can shape and tell stories in effective, entertaining, and multimodal ways.
Required Texts:
Bardugo, Leigh, The Language of Thorns
Gottschall, Jonathan, The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human
Leitman, Margot, Long Story Short: The Only Storytelling Guide You’ll Even Need
Pratchett, Terry, The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents

Other required texts will vary depending on the module chosen.
Format:
The course will be divided into three phases. In the first phase, we will read and discuss theories of storytelling and explore the elements that go into crafting effective stories. The second phase will be devoted to independent, partner, and/or small group work: students will choose the most relevant module for their own goals to study in depth and develop a final project. The available modules focus on storytelling for different purposes and contexts, including storytelling in the corporate workplace; storytelling in education; culturally specific folk narratives; transmedial storytelling; digital storytelling; and professional oral performance. The final phase will consist of the presentation and critique of the final projects, which will include a creative and critical component. The creative component will involve the development and presentation of a variety of types of stories; the critical component will grow out of the research performed in the chosen module.



ENG 375 Young Adult Literature

Advanced critical examination of literature for young adults with emphasis on trends and research.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Karen Coats

Psychologists and cultural critics agree that adolescence is a sociocultural phenomenon, the experience of which is highly dependent on the values, material goals, and affluence of a particular society.  It is a time for negotiating identity in the matrix of discourses of gender, race, nationality, ethnicity, technology, spirituality, embodiment, and ethics. But recent research on adolescence indicates that the experience of adolescence is also a biological one: teens have distinct ways of thinking and feeling that are related to the structure and growth of their brains. What stories, then, do contemporary authors of young adult literature tell, and how do they affect and influence a readership that is biologically predisposed to lead with their emotions while they are actively engaged in sorting out their identities and their values? To approach these questions, we will be reading books and viewing films that inspire strong emotional responses and/or produce a “shallowness of affect” while also asking readers to think about what it means to be white/black/brown/straight/gay/fluid/victim/bully/dying/neurodiverse/other in contemporary terms, and who gets to decide what such identity categories mean anyway. The theoretical orientation of the class is a synthesis of neuropsychoanalysis, cognitive poetics, cultural theory, and multimodal engagement.  
Required texts:

Alexie, Sherman, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-time Indian
Brosgol, Vera, Anya’s Ghost
Elliott, David, Bull
Gilbert, Kelly Loy, Picture Us in the Light
Niven, Jennifer, All the Bright Places
Older, Daniel José, Shadowshaper
Reyl, Hilary, Kids Like Us
Tharp, Tim, The Spectacular Now
Watson, Renée, This Side of Home
Yang, Gene Luen, American Born Chinese
Yeahpau, Thomas M., X-Indian Chronicles: The Book of Mausape

Films screened in class:
Me, Earl, and the Dying Girl
Smoke Signals

Class Format:
ENG 375 is discussion-heavy. You will be asked to engage in critical discussions of the texts and articles that we read, lead a discussion with a partner, keep a daybook, write an analytical paper, and complete a final project of your choice.

Section 02, TR at 2:00, Karen Coats

Psychologists and cultural critics agree that adolescence is a sociocultural phenomenon, the experience of which is highly dependent on the values, material goals, and affluence of a particular society.  It is a time for negotiating identity in the matrix of discourses of gender, race, nationality, ethnicity, technology, spirituality, embodiment, and ethics. But recent research on adolescence indicates that the experience of adolescence is also a biological one: teens have distinct ways of thinking and feeling that are related to the structure and growth of their brains. What stories, then, do contemporary authors of young adult literature tell, and how do they affect and influence a readership that is biologically predisposed to lead with their emotions while they are actively engaged in sorting out their identities and their values? To approach these questions, we will be reading books and viewing films that inspire strong emotional responses and/or produce a “shallowness of affect” while also asking readers to think about what it means to be white/black/brown/straight/gay/fluid/victim/bully/dying/neurodiverse/other in contemporary terms, and who gets to decide what such identity categories mean anyway. The theoretical orientation of the class is a synthesis of neuropsychoanalysis, cognitive poetics, cultural theory, and multimodal engagement.  
Required texts:

Alexie, Sherman, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-time Indian
Brosgol, Vera, Anya’s Ghost
Elliott, David, Bull
Gilbert, Kelly Loy, Picture Us in the Light
Niven, Jennifer, All the Bright Places
Older, Daniel José, Shadowshaper
Reyl, Hilary, Kids Like Us
Tharp, Tim, The Spectacular Now
Watson, Renée, This Side of Home
Yang, Gene Luen, American Born Chinese
Yeahpau, Thomas M., X-Indian Chronicles: The Book of Mausape

Films screened in class:
Me, Earl, and the Dying Girl
Smoke Signals

Class Format:
ENG 375 is discussion-heavy. You will be asked to engage in critical discussions of the texts and articles that we read, lead a discussion with a partner, keep a daybook, write an analytical paper, and complete a final project of your choice.



ENG 384 Introduction to Cultural Theory

Introduction to the history and practice of cultural theory.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Paul Ugor

This course is an introduction to the expansive interdisciplinary field of cultural theory. We will examine the foundations of cultural theory in Marxism, Psychoanalysis, Semiotics, Postmodernism, Feminism, Eco-criticism, Postcolonialism, and Queer Studies.  Our primary focus will be the specific ways in which cultural theory has radically shifted critical analysis away from abstract Universalist discourses to a much more grounded (material), contemporary (present-day) and every day (ordinary) life. Essentially, the course will serve as a crucial guide to the most important theories in the arts, humanities and the social sciences. The course will be especially useful for students in the field of literary and cultural studies, communication studies, visual cultures, theatre and performing arts,  ethnic, gender, queer, and postcolonial studies

Recommended Texts:
Imre Szeman & Timothy Kaposy (Eds.). Cultural Theory: An Anthology. West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell, 2011. (Required)
Paul Smith & Alexander Riley. Cultural Theory: An Introduction. 2nd Ed. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2009. (Required) 
Simon Malpas & Paul Wake (Eds.). The Routledge Companion to Critical and Cultural Theory. 2nd ed. London & New York: Routledge, 2013. (Recommended)
Peter Barry. Beginning Theory: An Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1995. (Recommended)



ENG 394 TESOL Practicum

Observation, case studies, tutoring, instructional assistance, and some teaching experience in English as a Second Language.

Section 01, R at 1:00, Lisya Seloni



ENG 398 Professional Practice: Internship in English

Supervised field experience in English with local, state, national, and international businesses, agencies, institutions (including colleges and universities), and organizations.

Section 01, Arrange, Elise Hurley



Back to top

Spring 2018

Please note this listing is of courses from a previous semester. Check back closer to your registration date to see descriptions for upcoming courses.



ENG 100 Introduction to English Studies

Reading and writing in English, an introduction to the various sub-disciplines of English.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, Chris Breu

Section 02, TR at 2:00, Ricardo Cruz



ENG 101 and 101.10 Composition as Critical Inquiry

Rhetorical approach to writing, taught through extrensive collaborative drafting, revising, and editing. Emphasis on critical reading and analysis.

101, Sections 1-60, various times and instructors

101.10, Sections 1-3, various times and instructors



ENG 102 Introduction to English Studies Seminar

A structured proseminar designed to introduce students to the complex intellectual and professional aspects of the degree in English Studies.

Section 01, MW at 1:00, Mark Vegter

Section 02, MW at 1:00, Alan Lin



ENG 110 English Literature and Its Contexts

A historical study of the main movements in English literature. Readings of entire works representative of the movements.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Jeff Rients

Section 02, TR at 2:00, Brian Rejack



IDS 121 Texts and Contexts

Interdisciplinary writing-intensive course focusing on significant humanities texts in relationship to their historical and cultural contexts.

121.19 Section 01, MW at 9:35, Hyun-Sook Kang

121.19 Section 02, TR at 9:35, Danielle Sutton

121.19 Section 03, MW at 11:00, Hyun-Sook Kang

121.19 Section 04, MW at 12:35, Britni Williams

121.19 Section 05, MW at 2:00, Jeremy Hurley

121.19 Section 06, TR at 11:00, Gabriel Gudding

121.19 Section 07, TR at 12:35, Gabriel Gudding

121.19 Section 08, MW at 3:35, Ben Sutton

121.19 Section 09, TR at 3:35, Evan Nave


121.29 Section 01, TR at 2:00, Susan Kalter

We know and understand the history and literature of the western hemisphere less than any other area of the globe. Certainly we know more about Europe and Asia than about our own continent, and we are taught more about them! This class is intended to throw a shovel’s full of dirt into that chasm of knowledge and self-knowledge. We will be familiarizing ourselves with a small selection of key issues affecting Native North America from the ninth century through the twenty-first, mainly through historical novels, poetry, histories, creative nonfiction, letters, lectures, autobiographies, and short stories written by Native writers. After introducing ourselves to the civilizations of Cahokia, the Caddo confederacies, the Haudenosaunee, and the Mississippian Art & Ceremonial Complex, we’ll follow the struggle of Dragging Canoe to maintain independence for the Cherokees in the face of U.S. independence and expansionism in the eighteenth century. We will look at resistance to the sabotage and removal policies of the states and the new U.S. nation and the development and waning of Creole communities in the Mississippi and Great Lakes region. Reservations, boarding school experiences, the policy of allotment, and the campaign against Native religions will form our next set of topics. We’ll then examine early twentieth century assaults on tribal families and their property, consider the New Deal’s impact on tribes, and discuss the political and environmental activism of the 1960s. Finally, we’ll read narratives about Native youth growing up today and into the future.


ENG 124 Film Style and Literature

An introduction to the analysis of films and their literary components through an application of specialized terms and concepts.

Section 01, online, William McBride

Fun but rigorous, blended (online Monday/in person Wednesday) film course that will show you how to see movies in a different way. Think of this course as an intensive English Department literature course in which you write essays in a "foreign" language--the language of film. The theory of Film Style & Literature argues that style can be detected, described, analyzed, and turned into meaning via metaphor. Your goal is to acquire adequate film vocabulary and skill from the textbook to convert your observations of camera placement and movement, lighting, spatial relationships, soundtrack, etc. into an analysis of the meaning of a "stylized moment" and, from that, of the film as a whole. Do not be misled by the fact that this is a 100 level General Education course--it is nonetheless challenging. Blended courses are not for everyone; all work and communication is via the written word, upon which all student success is based. 11 Weekly Chapter & Film Responses (250 word minimum) due Fridays 5pm. Students may not choose those assignments (regardless of the point value) they wish to complete.
2 Essays, Psycho post-stabbing sequence (900 word minimum); Into the Wild final (1350 word minimum)
Textbook: Stylized Moments. Turning Film Style Into Meaning 2013. Smashwords. ISBN 9781301579372


ENG 125 Literary Narrative

Critical reading and analysis of a variety of literary narratives that reflect on human experience.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, Erika Romero

In this reading-intensive section of ENG125, “Exploring Young Adult Literary Narratives,” we will focus on literary narratives written for and/or marketed to young adults, as well as adapted from young adult (YA) literature. In addition to reading and analyzing YA novels written by a diverse group of authors, we will also read and watch other young adult texts, including films, television shows, and fanworks. Alongside class discussions in which we analyze the social, cultural, generic, and media influences of these (and on these) texts, we will also critique these texts using formal and creative genres. Supplementary readings about literary narratives, YA literature, adaptations, and analysis will also be assigned throughout the semester, in order to help us achieve the course goals.

Section 02, TR at 12:35, Kirstin Zona

Section 03, MW at 11:00, Tharini Viswanath

Section 04, MW at 12:35, Cory Hudson

Section 05, TR at 3:35, Shane Combs

This section of English 125, “Joy Meets World: Joyful Narratives in Academic Spaces,” asks two primary questions: “How might explicit narrative concepts of joy impact how we view literature and our own lives?” and “Do the ideologies put forth in academic spaces more often include or exclude joy?” In this course, we will explore eastern and western concepts of joy, and we will apply them to literature, primarily the Harry Potter series. In addition, in this course we will:
-           Explore potential pathways to joy, including relational joy, mindfulness, intentional-attentional applications, imagination, mystery, and childlike wondering/wandering
-           Explore our individual majors to see if there currently exist explicit or implicit concepts of joy
-           Explore our own lives to see where these concepts of joy do/don’t exist and where they might now be capable of existing
-           Explore a common language of joy concepts/narratives, which will be applied in reading discussions, writing prompts, presentations, essays, and examinations

Section 06, MW at 2:00, Joe Amato

Section 07, TR at 11:00, Kirstin Zona

Section 08, MW at 3:35, Cory Hudson

Section 09, TR at 9:35, Shelby Ragan



ENG 128 Gender in the Humanities

Examination of gender roles, norms, and stereotypes from a broad range of perspectives within humanities across centuries and cultures.

Section 01, TR at 9:35, Evan Nave

Section 02, MW at 11:00, Eric Pitman

Section 03, MW at 12:35, Tharini Viswanath

Section 04, TR at 11:00, Krista Roberts

Section 05, MW at 3:35, Heidi Bowman

Section 06, MW at 2:00, Cristina Sanchez-Martin

Section 07, TR at 11:00, David Giovagnoli



ENG 130 Survey of American Literature

A historical study of the main movements in American literature. Readings of entire works representative of the movements.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, Jeremy Hurley



ENG 143 Unity and Diversity in Language

Study of the structure of language (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics) as it reflects cognition, social relations, cultural conventions, and seech communities.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, Olga Cochran

Section 02, TR at 11:00, Lyudmila Belomoina

Section 03, W at 5:30, Mijanur Rahman



ENG 145 and 145.13 Writing in the Academic Disciplines

Introduction to research-based writing for multiple academic audiences.

145 Sections 1-16, various times and instructors

145.13 Sections 1-13, various times and instructors



ENG 160 Introduction to Studies in Women's Writing

Readings in a variety of genres and historical periods.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Krista Roberts

Women Medical Writers/ Writing Women’s Medicine

In this course, I ask you to rethink what gets to count as “literature” and “writing” with the goal of meeting women on their own terms, at the site of their own, often unrecognized, participation in literature, writing, and knowledge formation. That means that we will be reading non-traditional texts, such as receipt books, letters, diaries, and portraits so as to learn the names of some women who contributed to medicine's story and what they contributed. We will address women in medicine from two perspectives: (1) How women contributed to healing practices, how they were denied participation, and how these roles reflect historiocultural concerns; (2) How ideas about individualism negate, erase, or deny these contributions and histories.

To do this, we’ll consider the formation of the western medical field via the first universities in the Early Modern Era and how women’s participation was forced out of this space, then we’ll travel to North America and read about Indigenous medicine to consider how women were/are seen as forces of healing. We’ll read about how slave women we forced to participate in medical “developments” in the Antebellum South (U.S), and we’ll read about Filipino nurses being forced to travel to the U.S. There is much more out there in regards to medicine and women’s writing, and I hope that you feel encouraged to pursue it should you care to do so.

This course is interdisciplinary. I see it as part Medical History, part Literature & Cultural Studies, part Gender Studies. You likely will notice different disciplinary intersections, and I encourage you to share such relevant observations. This enriches the experience of this course for all of us!

This course is designed like a survey in two ways: we cover a number of historical time periods in one semester, and we cover a number of cultural contexts in one semester (though all of these contexts are anchored to our position in the United States). At times, this course might feel like a road trip; we’ll drive by a number of cities and know where they are, and we’ll stop at a handful of them for deeper exploration.

Books:

Birthing a Slave: Motherhood and Medicine in the Antebellum South
Red Medicine: Traditional Indigenous Rites of Birthing and Healing 2nd ed
Women Healers: Portraits of Herbalists, Physicians, and Midwives
Empire of Care
: Nursing and Migration in Filipino American History
Women and the Practice of Medical Care in Early Modern Europe, 1400-1800


ENG 170 Foundations in Literature for Children

Introduction to genres of children's literature, including mythologies, fairy tales, picture books, poetry, and historical, multicultural, and current prose.

Section 01, TR at 8:00, Shelby Ragan

Section 02, MWF at 9:00, Agathe Lancrenon

Section 03, MWF at 10:00, Agathe Lancrenon

Section 04, MWF at 11:00, Britni Williams

Section 05, TR at 12:35, Wesley Jacques

Section 06, MW at 12:35, Jenn Coletta

Section 07, TR at 2:00, Eileen Bularzik



ENG 194 Introduction to English Education

This course is deisgned to introduce students to foundational concepts and issues associated with the teaching of high school English in diverse settings.

Section 01, TR at 11:00, Eileen Bularzik

Section 02, TR at 9:35, Eileen Bularzik



IDS 203 Nations and Narrations

Construction of national identities from cultural, philosophical, religious, and political empires using narrative discourse as a lens.

203.05 Africa, Section 02, MW at 11:00, Paul Ugor

Drawing on a wide range of genres that include prose fiction, plays, popular fiction and films/videos, this course will examine the development and growth of modern African literature from the late 1950s to the present. We will pay particular attention to the varied historical and cultural contexts that shaped the rise and global circulation of contemporary African literature and film since the mid-twentieth century. Covering different regions in the continent, the course will also look at the recurrent thematic concerns and unique stylistic techniques that some of the major writers from Africa have used since the 1960s. We will examine themes relating to colonization in Africa and its impact, cultural nationalism, politics and mis-governance in Africa, gender and identity politics, globalization and modernity in Africa, popular culture, etc. The main objective of the course will be to help students develop a greater appreciation of the socio-cultural, aesthetic and thematic representations in African Literature and film from its beginning in the pre-independence era to the present. Taken together, the course seeks to demonstrate the ways in which African Literature in general is both a product of and a response to global and local political, economic, cultural and social forces. Our aim is not only to explore what African literature tells us about Africa, but also what it tells us about literature itself as a global cultural form and subject matter.


ENG 206 Cultural Expressions in Social Contexts: Women of Asia, Latin America and Africa

Interdisciplinary study of varieties of women's cultural expressions within distinct social contexts including comparative emphasis on different regions of concern.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Samuel Kamara

This course exposes students to the various cultural experiences of African women in different social contexts in Senegal, Egypt, Sierra Leone, Nigeria, and Zimbabwe. It specifically examines how African women in these different geopolitical locations face various forms of oppressions, but, also, how most of them have used political, cultural, social, and gendered avenues to regain their agency and assert their independence. This class seeks to provide a modern narrative and insight into African feminism—one that differs from the traditional perspective of African women as the oppressed other of patriarchal societies. Contemporary African feminism has made significant strides in liberating African women, in encouraging grassroots and national organizing of women, and global networking with international feminist groups. With such gains, the statistics of gender inequity in most African countries have changed to reflect more women in politics, business, the work force, and education. This class will trace, through literary representation and other materials, how such cultural experiences were achieved over time. What issues do African feminists face today in this age of globalization and transculturation? How are African female writers representing the plight of the African woman? What are some of the contemporary visions of these African female writers? 

Section 02, TR at 3:35, Samuel Kamara

This course exposes students to the various cultural experiences of African women in different social contexts in Senegal, Egypt, Sierra Leone, Nigeria, and Zimbabwe. It specifically examines how African women in these different geopolitical locations face various forms of oppressions, but, also, how most of them have used political, cultural, social, and gendered avenues to regain their agency and assert their independence. This class seeks to provide a modern narrative and insight into African feminism—one that differs from the traditional perspective of African women as the oppressed other of patriarchal societies. Contemporary African feminism has made significant strides in liberating African women, in encouraging grassroots and national organizing of women, and global networking with international feminist groups. With such gains, the statistics of gender inequity in most African countries have changed to reflect more women in politics, business, the work force, and education. This class will trace, through literary representation and other materials, how such cultural experiences were achieved over time. What issues do African feminists face today in this age of globalization and transculturation? How are African female writers representing the plight of the African woman? What are some of the contemporary visions of these African female writers? 



ENG 217 Studies in Romanticism

Studies of texts from the Romantic period.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, Brian Rejack



ENG 219 Studies in Contemporary English Literature

Studies in texts written in English from the Contemporary period.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Cynthia Huff

In this course we will consider works by a diverse group of twentieth and twenty-first century British writers and place them within their historical, political, and social contexts. Not only will we examine writers who have been traditionally regarded as major figures, such as Conrad, Yeats, Eliot, Woolf, Joyce, and Orwell, but we will also read more recent writers, such as Beckett, Churchill, Naipaul, Smith, and Rushdie to enhance our understanding of the complexities of contemporary British literature and the many voices which have contributed to, and contested, what Englishness entails. We will consider the various literary genres contemporary writers have used, as well as their choices for these, and pay especial attention to a writer’s choice of language, both because the Modernists revolted against the language practices of their predecessors, the Victorians, and because more recent British writers have questioned the colonizing effect of writing in English. The course will be structured chronologically but also emphasize broad cultural and political questions, such as Nationalism, Empire, Modernity, Identities, Gender, Race, Class, Colonialism, and Post- Colonialism, in an effort to familiarize students with crucial issues inflecting modern British society so that they understand how these affect the production of literature and culture and how literature and culture influence


ENG 227 Introduction to Creative Writing

Opportunity for creative writing of various kinds, such as poetry, fiction, and nonfiction.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Amish Trivedi

Section 02, TR at 9:35, Sara Lyons

Section 03, MW at 12:35, Amish Trivedi

Section 04, TR at 2:00, Gabriel Gudding

Section 05, MW at 3:35, Kass Fleisher



ENG 234 American Literature: 1920-1945

Trends in American Literature between the World Wars.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, Sally Parry



ENG 236 American Literature: 1945-present

Present-day trends in American literature.

Section 01, TR at 9:35, Robert McLaughlin

This course will focus on postmodernism as an aesthetic and as a cultural practice. It will also explore the movement from postmodernism to whatever comes next. Among the outstanding authors I anticipate our reading are Jorge Luis Borges, Carol De Chellis Hill, Thomas Pynchon, Ishmael Reed, Don DeLillo, Mary Caponegro, Michael Chabon, and David Foster Wallace. There will also be some theory readings. Class meetings will be rigorously discussion-based. During the semester each student will do a research presentation. There will be a 8-10-page, research-based essay, a short essay, a midterm, and a final exam.


ENG 239 Multimodal Composition

Workshop emphasizing rhetorical analysis and composition of digital texts in a variety of modes including graphics, typography, audio, video, animation.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, Elise Hurley



ENG 241 Growth and Structure of the English Language

An introduction to the history of English designed to help students understand language change and the emergence of contemporary English.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, Susan Kim & K. Aaron Smith



ENG 243 The Grammatical Structure of English

Linguistic description of present day American English, focusing on morphology and syntax.

Section 01, MWF at 10:00, Susan Burt

Section 02, TR at 3:35, Mahide Demirci

Section 03, TR at 2:00, Mahide Demirci

Section 04, MWF at 11:00, Susan Burt



ENG 244 Applied Grammar and Usage for Writers

Traditional, structural, and transformational grammars applied to needs of writers. Choosing among alternative grammatical strategies. Usage; semantics of punctuation. Revising.

Section 02, TR at 3:35, Linda Lienhart



ENG 246 Advanced Composition

Extensice writing of essays developed in greater depth and sophistication in subject matter than those written in previous writing courses.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, Julie Jung

Section 02, TR at 11:00, Bob Broad

This section of “Advanced Composition” (ENG 246) challenges students to push the boundaries of their abilities and experiences as readers and writers in the genre of creative non-fiction.  Relevant sub-genres include: memoir, essay of place, portrait/profile, and personal essay. (Please note: Because of some overlap in course content, this course is not recommended for students who have taken or are taking  ENG 247.03, “Intermediate Creative Writing: Non-Fiction.”)
Participants in this class will pursue specific course activities and assignments designed to help students achieve these learning goals:

  • Explore the genre of creative nonfiction to understand its sub-genres, character, limitations, possibilities, purposes, and venues for publication
  • Read creative nonfiction and other texts with care and deep intellectual and emotional engagement and respond to those readings in writing and in discussions
  • Experiment with and develop multiple strategies for moving through their writing processes
  • Write several pieces of creative nonfiction, at least one of which is suitable for publication in a specific public or professional forum and at least one of which integrates empirical and/or textual research to enhance the writing
  • Collaborate with their professor and their fellow students as (co-)authors of texts and/or as appreciative and critical reviewers of each other’s texts
  • Revise texts’ content radically and globally as well as locally and on the surface, employing revision as the most powerful strategy for achieving discovery, insight, surprise, and breakthrough (and therefore quality) in one’s own writing and for one’s readers
  • Analyze rhetorical situations and determine what writing strategies and techniques lead to success in various reading and writing contexts


ENG 247 Intermediate Creative Writing

Workshop in genre, with critical examination of its conventions.

247.01 Poetry, MW at 2:00, Ben Sutton

247.02 Fiction, TR at 11:00, Ricardo Cruz

247.03 Non-fiction, MW at 2:00, Kass Fleisher



ENG 249 Technical and Professional Writing I

Introduction to technical and professional writing. Includes study of manuals, reports, proposals, audience analysis, formatting, and style.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Lisa Phillips

Section 02, TR at 11:00, Lisa Dooley

Section 03, TR at 12:35, Sarah Warren-Riley

Section 04, TR at 2:00, Sarah Warren-Riley

Section 05, TR at 9:35, Lisa Dooley

Section 06, MW at 12:35, Oriana Gilson



ENG 251 Literature of the Bible II

Major idead and literary forms of the Christian Bible (New Testament) and Apocrypha.

Section 01, MW at 9:35, Jan Neuleib

REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS:

At least one translation of the New Testament/Greek Scriptures
Access to other translations on line or in libraries
Readings I give or send to you

DESCRIPTION OF COURSE:

The literature of the Bible divides into many different genres across many centuries. In the New Testament course, we will bring our own personalities to the reading of the gospel stories and the letters of Paul and Peter. We will refer back to the range of types of literature in the Old Testament or Hebrew Scriptures since Jesus often quotes these texts, as does Paul. We will look at the ways that the stories of Jesus as Messiah have influenced storytelling and poetry throughout the history of literature. We will look also at the representations in current literature that owe much to these earlier works, often without specific references in the revised versions of the stories and lyrics. Be prepared to enjoy bringing yourself to these stories and letters. In case you have not read the Gospels and letters, be prepared to see some fascinating contradictions and contrasts.

FORMAT OF COURSE:

Class interactions include collaborative activities designed to integrate your understanding of the works with your existing knowledge.  In-class writings in response to readings will direct our discussions.  You will present your final paper (or other type of project) to the class. 



ENG 253 Introduction to Histories and Theories od Publishing

Study of historical and theoretical contexts in publishing, including book history, textual studies, and manuscript, print, and digital cultures.

Section 01, TR at 11:00, Robert McLaughlin

This course will examine the field of literary publishing in the United States as a mechanism of mediation between authors and readers.  The focus will be on the history of publishing with special emphasis on how changing technology has reframed a set of ongoing issues (risk of publication, copyright, censorship, marketing, distribution, and so on).  We will also examine some case studies in the relationship among author, text, and editor.

Class meetings will be discussion-based.  Each student will participate in a collaborative research presentation.  There will be four three-page essays and one research-based essay.

Texts I anticipate using include:

Eugene Exman, The House of Harper
Bennett Cerf, At Random
Jason Epstein, Book Business
Siva Vaidhyanathan, Copyrights and Copywrongs
Ted Striphas, The Late Age of Print
John B. Thompson, Merchants of Culture



ENG 254 Introduction to Professional Publishing

Study and practice of editorial, production, printing, and marketing processes involved with producing a book or journal.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Holms Troelstrup



ENG 255 Modern Global Literature: 1800-present

Comparative study of significant texts of modern global literature.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Paul Ugor

The term “world literature” implies the dissemination of literature from and to countries across the globe.  Global or world literature, in the modern sense, therefore refers to literary works that have been translated into multiple languages and circulated to an audience outside their country of origin. As new ways emerge of delivering literature to readers worldwide, literary scholars are beginning to examine the impact that these works have on global culture and the ways that cultures can, and have transformed the world, especially by offering us new insights into other forms of human experience. This course, thus, examines the ways in which modern global literature can be an amazing instrument for analyzing globalization. Drawing from both writers and filmmakers from different regions of the world, we will examine how modern cultural producers capture the intricacies of our globalized world and how their works circulate within that world to find their own audiences. Our study of modern global literature aims to demonstrate how that genre functions as a powerful cultural tool for understanding globalization.



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ENG 265 Foundations of African-American Literature and Culture

Concepts, themes, generic conventions, and major historical events and figures central to African-American literature and culture.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, Chris De Santis

This course is designed as an intensive introduction to the African American literary and cultural traditions. By studying some of the major texts, writers, and themes that have shaped African American literature from its beginnings in the folklore and sorrow songs of slaves to the present, we will gain an understanding of key concepts, such as the quest for literacy and freedom, call and response, masking, signifying, passing, miscegenation, and double consciousness; themes, such as bondage and freedom, family, and identity; conventions of various genres, such as the use of authenticating devices in slave narratives, the use of black speech as literary diction, and the impact of folk material on all genres; and major historical events, such as the Middle Passage, slavery, Emancipation, Reconstruction, and the Civil Rights Movement, and figures, such as Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, W. E. B. Du Bois, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, and Ralph Ellison. 

Students in this class will also receive a thorough grounding in significant moments in African American history, and we will focus our readings on the social, political, and economic contexts in which African American writers created a body of work that is essential to an informed understanding of American culture in general. This course will provide you with the opportunity to experience some of the most stunningly original, thought-provoking, troubling, and beautiful literature ever created in the United States. We will also explore the importance of the oral tradition to African American literature, examining the ways in which musical forms such as Gospel, Spirituals, the Blues, and Rap have influenced the written texts that reflect various aspects of the African American experience in the United States.

Anticipated Booklist:
The Norton Anthology of African American Literature, Third Edition, Vols. 1 & 2
Paul Laurence Dunbar, The Sport of the Gods
Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man
Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God



ENG 271 Literature for Young Children

Analysis of works written for children ages 5 to 9, including multicultural picture books, fairy tales, poetry, and chapter books.

Section 01, TR at 9:35, Jan Susina

This will be a course in children’s literature focusing on texts that are read to or read by children from ages five-to-nine, or grades one through three.  Students will read and consider various interpretations of folk tales, fables, nursery rhymes, poems, music, picture books, informational books, chapter books, series books, graphic novels and films created for, or presented to young children.  The course will examine how children understand and use such texts and will explore the ways that children’s books express attitudes and assumptions about childhood and children.
Required Texts:
M.C. Waldrep, editor.  Favorite Fairy Tales. Dover.
Hans Christian Andersen. The Little Mermaid & Other Fairy Tales. Dover.
Jon Scieszka & Lane Smith.  The Stinky Cheese Man & Other Fairly Stupid Tales.  Puffin.
Aesop.  The Fables of Aesop.  Joseph Jacobs, editor.  Dover.
Arnold Lobel.  Frog and Toad Are Friends.  Harper Collins.
Philip Smith, editor. Favorite Poems of Childhood. Dover.
Beatrix Potter.  The Complete Adventures of Peter Rabbit.  Warne.
Margaret Wise Brown.  Goodnight Moon.  Harper Collins.
Crockett Johnson.  Harold and the Purple Crayon.  Harper Collins.
Dr. Seuss.  The Cat in the Hat.  Random House.
Maurice Sendak.  Where the Wild Things Are.  Harper Collins.
Barbara Kerley. The Dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins. Harper Collins.
Ezra Jack Keats.  The Snowy Day. Puffin.
A.A. Milne.  Winnie-the-Pooh.  Puffin.
Beverly Cleary.  Ramona the Brave. Avon Camelot.
Jennifer L. Holm & Matthew Holm.  Babymouse: Our Hero. Random House.
Molly Bang. Picture This: How Pictures Work. Chronicle Books.

Section 02, TR at 11:00, Jan Susina

This will be a course in children’s literature focusing on texts that are read to or read by children from ages five-to-nine, or grades one through three.  Students will read and consider various interpretations of folk tales, fables, nursery rhymes, poems, music, picture books, informational books, chapter books, series books, graphic novels and films created for, or presented to young children.  The course will examine how children understand and use such texts and will explore the ways that children’s books express attitudes and assumptions about childhood and children.
Required Texts:
M.C. Waldrep, editor.  Favorite Fairy Tales. Dover.
Hans Christian Andersen. The Little Mermaid & Other Fairy Tales. Dover.
Jon Scieszka & Lane Smith.  The Stinky Cheese Man & Other Fairly Stupid Tales.  Puffin.
Aesop.  The Fables of Aesop.  Joseph Jacobs, editor.  Dover.
Arnold Lobel.  Frog and Toad Are Friends.  Harper Collins.
Philip Smith, editor. Favorite Poems of Childhood. Dover.
Beatrix Potter.  The Complete Adventures of Peter Rabbit.  Warne.
Margaret Wise Brown.  Goodnight Moon.  Harper Collins.
Crockett Johnson.  Harold and the Purple Crayon.  Harper Collins.
Dr. Seuss.  The Cat in the Hat.  Random House.
Maurice Sendak.  Where the Wild Things Are.  Harper Collins.
Barbara Kerley. The Dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins. Harper Collins.
Ezra Jack Keats.  The Snowy Day. Puffin.
A.A. Milne.  Winnie-the-Pooh.  Puffin.
Beverly Cleary.  Ramona the Brave. Avon Camelot.
Jennifer L. Holm & Matthew Holm.  Babymouse: Our Hero. Random House.
Molly Bang. Picture This: How Pictures Work. Chronicle Books.



ENG 272 Literature for Middle Grades

Analysis of works written for children ages 9 to 13, including multicultural novels and information books, children's media, and culture.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Karen Coats

Middle school and junior high is a period in most kids’ lives where they undergo a series of realignments: friendships, interests, activities, levels of care and attention, and even bodies cycle through changes that are often traumatic in ways that are unacknowledged or considered unimportant, glossed over as “growing pains” with no serious or lasting impact. In this class, we will focus on the emotional weight of these changes by looking at literature that frankly explores middle school drama and trauma, and see what the literature suggests is necessary for resilience. We will treat film, novels, poetry, and nonfiction equally as literature, exploring formal qualities as well as ideological content.
Books to buy:
Bloom, Naama, HelloFlo: The Guide, Period
Bloor, Edward, Tangerine
Curtis, Christopher Paul, The Watsons Go to Birmingham
Grimes, Nikki, Planet Middle School
Mafi, Tehereh, Whichwood
Ness, Patrick, A Monster Calls
Reynolds, Jason, Ghost

Section 02, MW at 3:35, Karen Coats

Middle school and junior high is a period in most kids’ lives where they undergo a series of realignments: friendships, interests, activities, levels of care and attention, and even bodies cycle through changes that are often traumatic in ways that are unacknowledged or considered unimportant, glossed over as “growing pains” with no serious or lasting impact. In this class, we will focus on the emotional weight of these changes by looking at literature that frankly explores middle school drama and trauma, and see what the literature suggests is necessary for resilience. We will treat film, novels, poetry, and nonfiction equally as literature, exploring formal qualities as well as ideological content.
Books to buy:
Bloom, Naama, HelloFlo: The Guide, Period
Bloor, Edward, Tangerine
Curtis, Christopher Paul, The Watsons Go to Birmingham
Grimes, Nikki, Planet Middle School
Mafi, Tehereh, Whichwood
Ness, Patrick, A Monster Calls
Reynolds, Jason, Ghost



ENG 283 Rhetorical Theory and Applications

Critical and analytical examination of the nature and historical development of rehetorical theory and its applications to contemporary discourse.

Section 01, TR at 11:00, Julie Jung



ENG 287 Independent Study

Arrange with instructor.



ENG 291 Undergraduate Teaching Experience

Arrange with instructor.



ENG 296 The Teaching of Literature

Examines current scholarship in the teaching of literature at the secondary level; integrates theories of teaching literature with teaching practice. Includes Clinical Experiences: 10 hours, Type 1-5 and 9.

Section 01, MW at 12:35, Kristen Strom

Section 02, MW at 11:00, Kristen Strom



ENG 297 The Teaching of Writing

Examines current scholarship in the teaching of writing at the secondary level; integrates theories of teaching writing with teaching practice. Includes Clinical Experiences: 15 hours, Type 1-5 and 9.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Sarah Hochstetler



ENG 299 Independent Honors Study

Arrange with instructor.



ENG 300 Senior Seminar

Capstone course for English majors, synthesizing the main dimensions of English studies. Requires senior project and portfolio.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Sarah Hochstetler

In this section of ENG 300, we’ll explore the climate of public education in our nation with a specific focus on neoliberal reform. We’ll ask the broad questions of who makes the decisions, and what qualifies them to do so? And we’ll ask more specifically how the ongoing commodification of education impacts how we think about teaching and learning and what the future of schooling looks like for the United States. We’ll read op-eds, blog posts, book chapters, and scholarly articles; we’ll inquire into the effects of the neoliberal reform movement on various levels of stakeholders; we'll synthesize those voices with our own, and we’ll do this with two goals: 1) to think critically about past and current education reform and apply that knowledge to our understanding of schooling, and 2) to consider our roles as participants in the system we’re critiquing and as potential change agents at a time when we’re expected to uphold the status quo.

Our seminar will be reliant on the active participation of all members of the learning community. This means that students take responsibility for the discussion and reading selection as well as the instructor.

Required Course Texts: Forthcoming

Section 02, TR at 3:35, Ricardo Cruz

Section 03, TR at 12:35, Chris Breu

In this version of Senior Seminar we will be read media studies theory and apply it to popular culture. The course is organized as a seminar with a lengthy final paper among other writing assignments.

Section 04, TR at 2:00, Chris Breu

In this version of Senior Seminar we will be read media studies theory and apply it to popular culture. The course is organized as a seminar with a lengthy final paper among other writing assignments.


ENG 310 History and Development of the English Language

Development of the English language from the Old English period to the present.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, K. Aaron Smith

English 310 is the advanced course on the history of English. The course reviews the major developments of the English language, viewing many of them as simple straightforward facts. The course, however, complicates those “facts” by investigating further linguistic and sociolinguistic data that allow for alternative explanations/accounts. Thus, the objective of the course is not only for students to learn or review a history of English but also to develop a more critical eye toward English language historiography.


ENG 311 Introduction to Old English Language and Literature

Elements of Old English grammar, with selected readings in Old English literature.

Section 01, TR at 12:35, Susan Kim



ENG 341 Introduction to Descriptive Linguistics

Aims and methods of linguistic science. Nature and functions of language: phonology, morphology, syntax, variation.

Section 01, MWF at 9:00, Susan Burt



ENG 343 Cross-Cultural Issues in TESOL

The relationship between language, culture, and cultural awareness in the learning and teaching of English as a Second Language.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Lisya Seloni



ENG 344 TESOL: Theoretical Foundations

Linguistic theories: first and second language acquisition; cognitive, affective, and cultural factors in teaching English as a Second Language.

Section 01, MW at 2:00, Lisya Seloni



ENG 347.02 Advanced Creative Writing: Prose

Workshop format for individual projects; related theory.

Section 01, MW at 3:35, Joe Amato



ENG 349 Technical Writing II

Instruction and practice in editing, proposals, and analytical writing; attention given to style manuals, research writing, and (as needed) publication.

Section 01, MW at 3:35, Angela Haas



ENG 351 Hypertext

Workshop using digital technologies to compose comlex, multimodal, Web-based texts for a variety of rhetorical situations.

Section 01, TR at 3:35, Erika Sparby



ENG 355 Forensic Bibliography and Archival Editing

History of print culture from orality to digital text; introduction to principles and practices of bibliographic investigation and scholarly editing.

Section 01, TR at 2:00, Tara Lyons



ENG 358 Topics in Publishing Studies

Topics in specific theories, histories, trends, methodologies, practices, or figures in publishing.

Section 01, M at 5:30, Duriel Harris



ENG 360 Studies in Women's Writing

Studies in and theories of women's writing.

Section 01, MW at 3:35, Cynthia Huff

This course focuses on the diversity of women's autobiographical expression historically, cross-culturally, and generically. We'll interrogate the similarities/differences between types of life writing discourse such as diaries, essays, testimonio, graphic life writing and historical/cultural narrative, and ask how the assumed/implied audience, the historical period, multiple voices, the geographical location, as well as issues of race, class, age, ability, sexual orientation, and relationship affect women's autobiographical acts. We'll question whether the term autobiography fits women's practices, consider if the term life writing/narrative is more appropriate, and discuss what distinctions between autobiography and biography, on one hand, or literature, on the other hand, seem meaningful.

Because life writing extends across the boundaries of English Studies as well as transgresses the boundaries of other disciplines to include art, history, and psychology, for example, it’s ideal for thinking about how and why we read texts and considering teaching strategies. This course will ask how reading a variety of women’s life writing texts helps us learn about ourselves as critical consumers and about others’ lives, and suggest some strategies for how to teach life writing. This course is ideal for anyone who ever wanted to think about how his/her life might be written, to investigate how different women have written their lives, to explore how you might convey the dynamics of a life to anyone who wants to think about how important living a life is.

Because a major component of the course is pedagogical, it fulfills the pedagogy requirement for graduate students. Because of its emphasis on teaching, it is also ideal for undergraduate education majors. It also is an elective for the Women and Gender Studies minor.

This course is interdisciplinary in nature and would benefit rhetoric, writing studies, linguistics, creative writing, and technical communications specialists.



ENG 373 Poetry for Children

Poetry for children and early adolescents, including various categories, elements, and well-known poets in the field.

Section 01, M at 5:30, Karen Coats

From nursery rhymes and cradle songs to young adult SLAM poetry competitions, youth poetry plays a vital role in teaching us the rhythms of our languages, connecting us to other people, and shaping our emotional lives. In this class we will explore how that happens from various angles. We will take a linguistics approach, examining how poetic language mirrors and enhances and yet is fundamentally different from sensory, embodied experience (there is chocolate involved here); a developmental approach, looking at how the luminous communicative musicality of early childhood morphs into the humorously transgressive poetry of middle childhood and culminates in the full-blown protests of young adult poetry; and an aesthetics approach, attempting to figure out what makes a good poem good. We will also spend some time looking at verse novels for various ages, and how poetry and illustration interact in poetic picturebooks.
Books to buy:
Elliott, David, Bull
Alexander, Kwame, Out of Wonder: Poems Celebrating Poets
Smith, Hope Anita, The Way a Door Closes
Grimes, Nikki, Planet Middle School
Singer, Marilyn, Mirror, Mirror: A Book of Reverso Poems
Sidman, Joyce, This is Just to Say: Poems of Apology and Forgiveness
Wolf, Allan, Immersed in Verse: An Informative, Slightly Irreverent, and Totally Tremendous Guide to Living the Poet’s Life
Frost, Helen, Diamond Willow
Janeczko, Paul, Firefly July: A Year of Very Short Poems
Hoberman, Mary Ann, Forget-Me-Nots: Poems to Learn by Heart



ENG 375 Young Adult Literature

Advanced critical examination of literature for young adults with emphasis on trends and research.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Mary Moran

A wide variety of experiences marks the transition from childhood to adulthood through that ever-changing stage known as adolescence.  In this class, we’ll focus on the question of how young people learn to make mature ethical decisions.  Of course, this approach necessitates guidelines about what it means to make “mature ethical decisions.”  Therefore, as background to our analysis of literature, we’ll start by reading two groundbreaking studies of moral development by Lawrence Kohlberg and Carol Gilligan.  Kohlberg proposes that the highest level of morality is the ability to make decisions according to universal principles; Gilligan suggests an alternative model in which moral decision-making must take into account the relationships among particular individuals and the communities in which they live.  We’ll use these ideas to investigate novels from various time periods and subgenres, all written for and about young adults, with protagonists who explore their responsibilities to self, particular others, and community.  Texts will include Laurie Halse Anderson’s Speak, Benjamin Alire Saenz’s Dante and Aristotle Discover the Secrets of the Universe, Philip Pullman’s The Golden Compass, and Randa Abdel-Fattah’s Does My Head Look Big in This?.  Most of our classes will be devoted to discussion, though we will also use class time for writing and for peer workshopping; students should expect to be actively engaged in their learning during each class.  In addition to thoughtful and interactive participation, student responsibilities will include a day of leading discussion and three papers (a 3-4 page paper and an 8-10 page paper for all students and a final paper of 10-12 pages for undergraduates, 20-25 for graduate students).



ENG 385 Life Writing/Narrative in Theory and Practice

Theoretical and practical consideration of interdisciplinary field of life writing/narrative. Textual production and reception, representation, rhetoric, memory, narrative, genre.

Section 01, T at 5:30, Cynthia Huff

   This class combines the theory and practice of life writing/narrative to look at the ways in which life writing/narrative is practiced and how scholars theorize that practice. To do that we’ll consider different genres, such as the diary, the essay, graphic memoir, biography, autobiography, and oral history, and consider, too, how the presentation of life stories by using different media, such as photos and drawing, affects their effect, thus raising questions of material production. For us to establish a vocabulary used by life writing scholars, we’ll read critical texts that discuss key terms in life writing scholarship, such as identity/subjectivity, truth value, agency, autobiographical subject, and autobiographical act, among others, as well as examine the interfaces between the theoretical practices of life writing scholars and those more generally used in English Studies. We’ll also act as life writers, both by writing our own lives and by critiquing how the members of the discourse community created in our class individually and collectively use life narrative to tell their stories. Several of the assigned texts will help us understand the interchange between the theory and practice of life writing/narrative as their authors foreground this. The theme of this course focuses on the family, very broadly conceived, so that the families we’ll read about over the course of the semester are human biological, cross species, and affectively conceived ones, thus allowing us to interrogate what it means to invoke “family” when creating a life writing/narrative text.

This course acts an elective for the Women and Gender Studies minor and, because it is interdisciplinary in nature and deals with both the theory and practice of life writing, it would benefit rhetoric, writing studies, linguistics, creative writing, and technical communications specialists.



ENG 394 TESOL Practicum

Observation, case studies, tutoring, instructional assistance, and some teaching experience in English as a Second Language.

Section 01, W at 1:00, Lisya Seloni



ENG 396 The Writing Seminar

Concentration upon a major writing project and the formulation of an individual Writing Portfolio.

Section 01, MW at 11:00, Jeremy Hurley



ENG 398 Professional Practice: Internship in English

Supervised field experience in English with local, state, national, and international businesses, agencies, institutions(including colleges and universities), and organizations.

Section 01, Arrange, Elise Hurley



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